I have always believed that artists create for themselves first, and their audience second. They build, paint, write, compose, design and sell from a place inside themselves that is never satisfied.

I submit that selling fine jewelry is, indeed, a creative endeavor. Great salespeople affect others in the same way that a songwriter can. The art of the story changes lives, and the masters in this realm create excitement and anticipatory tension, all the while building to a conclusion that is unknown, even to them, until it presents itself. And their audience — made up of clients, in this case — is happy.

In my last piece, I wrote: “Do it for the greater good, and before you know it things will improve, and you’ll realize you’re doing it for yourself.”

I guess it sounds good, but what are you supposed to do with that? “Wait a minute,” you might ask. “Exactly whom am I serving here? Is it about the customer? The business? My co-workers? My boss, or me?”

If you're expecting me to say, "Your guests and clients," you're wrong. Yes, you’re in this business to serve others, but before you can rock it out for them, you have to plug in to what you get out of it.

Sounds selfish, huh? I suppose it is, but you will reward your audience a thousand times over if you find your thrill in all of this.  

Welcome to the Big Time

Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones once said, “I don’t think they quite understand what I get out of this. I’m not doing it just for the money or for you. I’m doing it for me.”

Big Dog artists, athletes, sellers and bankers — you name it — are as selfish as they come when it comes to their craft. There is a thrill factor as they improvise, adapt and influence circumstances to achieve the desired outcome, namely, to crush it for everyone involved. It’s symbiotic, meaning everyone involved gets something out of it. (Thank you to my friend John Cordova for simplifying this for me.)

This doesn’t have to be on a grand scale, either. It can happen every day in your store, one audience member at a time, until you have a legion of fans who know you by name.  But first, you need to find your thrill.    

Finding Your Thrill

Here’s what I want you to do:

Grab a pen and paper. Sit, think and write, doodle or scribble your way to an answer to these questions: “What is the biggest thrill about selling jewelry for me? Where does my ‘fist pump’ come from in this whole deal?”

Forget about what you think you’re supposed to say, or what you’ve been told is the real reason we are in the jewelry business. Free-flow this exercise and write down the words as they come. (Even if it sounds ridiculous.)

Once you have a workable list, start whittling it down to the essence of your thrill. The final word count is immaterial, and it doesn’t even have to make sense to anyone but you.

Then start looking for ways to feed your thrill through what you do and how you do it.  Find ways to align all the sales training and product knowledge and spiffs and accolades with your thrill, and it will be one of your most powerful allies. It is a weapon of service for you and your clients.

Good luck and let me know what your thrill is if you’re so inclined. (Not gonna lie, comments and interactions are my thrill.)

Next up:  Stop Being So Selfish.


ANDY KOEHN is the owner of Koehn & Koehn Jewelers in West Bend, WI.

 



This article is an online extra for INSTORE Online.


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