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A Plea to Young Jewelry Store Owners and More of Your Letters for March

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An Open Letter to Young Jewelry Store Owners 

Don’t get locked into a narrow focus on merchandising, types of metals, or even stone types. Keep your store fresh. Take real note of what your clients wear, and how they spend. Stock those “always a good seller” types, and add some more arts-based jewelry and stones. Keep in mind my old rule “Quality before Quantity” when buying even a $10 stock item. Is it the best quality that you can get? I think customers today, even when they have the discretionary money to purchase, need some sensible but sometimes catchy “permissions” to spend. My favorite is, “We have low adoption fees for that item!” Get them laughing, as it lowers the wall they may have. — D. Robert Smith, Dancing Raven Stoneworks, Durango, CO

Death of a Salesman

Nothing to say. Brick-and-mortars are becoming extinct. We are all doomed. — Steve & Pat DeChristofaro, Harnik Brothers Jewelers, Tarrytown, NY

Keep It Positive

2016 sounds like it was a real kick in the pants for the majority of us out there. Here’s to a much better year! — Marc Majors, Sam L. Majors, Midland, TX

Reinvent Yourself

Constantly reevaluate! Keep trying new things, watch what the big boys are doing, read magazines from other industries, take the leap! Ask lots of questions of professional consultants and see what they say. Train and you will learn from others. Quitting is not an option. — Susan Eisen, Susan Eisen Fine Jewelry & Watches, El Paso, TX

On the Other Hand …

People who quit are generally on the cusp of succeeding. Ergo, don’t give up! — Chuck Kuba, Iowa Diamond, West Des Moines, IA


 

This article originally appeared in the March 2017 edition of INSTORE.

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Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

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A Plea to Young Jewelry Store Owners and More of Your Letters for March

mm

Published

on

An Open Letter to Young Jewelry Store Owners 

Don’t get locked into a narrow focus on merchandising, types of metals, or even stone types. Keep your store fresh. Take real note of what your clients wear, and how they spend. Stock those “always a good seller” types, and add some more arts-based jewelry and stones. Keep in mind my old rule “Quality before Quantity” when buying even a $10 stock item. Is it the best quality that you can get? I think customers today, even when they have the discretionary money to purchase, need some sensible but sometimes catchy “permissions” to spend. My favorite is, “We have low adoption fees for that item!” Get them laughing, as it lowers the wall they may have. — D. Robert Smith, Dancing Raven Stoneworks, Durango, CO

Death of a Salesman

Nothing to say. Brick-and-mortars are becoming extinct. We are all doomed. — Steve & Pat DeChristofaro, Harnik Brothers Jewelers, Tarrytown, NY

Keep It Positive

2016 sounds like it was a real kick in the pants for the majority of us out there. Here’s to a much better year! — Marc Majors, Sam L. Majors, Midland, TX

Reinvent Yourself

Constantly reevaluate! Keep trying new things, watch what the big boys are doing, read magazines from other industries, take the leap! Ask lots of questions of professional consultants and see what they say. Train and you will learn from others. Quitting is not an option. — Susan Eisen, Susan Eisen Fine Jewelry & Watches, El Paso, TX

On the Other Hand …

People who quit are generally on the cusp of succeeding. Ergo, don’t give up! — Chuck Kuba, Iowa Diamond, West Des Moines, IA

Advertisement
 

This article originally appeared in the March 2017 edition of INSTORE.

 

 

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular