Connect with us

A Very Different Customer Service Model

mm

Published

on

A story appeared over the weekend in the New York Times about a business that has a very different sort of customer service model. (Read the story here.)

I’m not going to refer to the company by name for reasons that will be apparent momentarily, or if you read the article. 

The business is an online eyeglasses retailer that sells the highest-end brands and also happens to rank highest among Google searches — higher, in fact, than many eyeglass manufacturers’ own websites. How’d this company get so high up in the rankings? By providing the absolute worst customer service possible.

Yep, you read that right. The company stocks no eyeglass frames. When an order comes in, it scours eBay and other sites to find frames that are close to what the customer ordered — maybe legitimate, maybe counterfeit. In this business model, it doesn’t really matter. When complaints roll in, the owner of the company comes out swinging, using foul language, threatening lawsuits until the customer shuts up, or, more likely, vents his frustrations on the many consumer review and complaints sites out there. Anytime this company’s name registers on one of those sites, lo and behold, the algorithms of the highest-tech search engine out there pick up on the buzz on that company (never mind that it’s negative buzz) and ranks it higher in the search findings.

On the bright side of what’s a pretty shocking business model, the company’s owner says it’s very tiring being that belligerent. Maybe he’ll wear himself out.

Meantime, it’s just another reason to favor the traditional bricks and mortar store. And if you do read the NYT story, make sure you don’t pick up any tips; better read INSTORE for those!

Advertisement

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

Retirement Made Easy with Wilkerson

The store was a landmark in Topeka, Kansas, but after 80 years in business, it was time for Briman’s Leading Jewelers to close up shop. Third generation jeweler and owner Rob Briman says the decision wasn’t easy, but the sale that followed was — all thanks to Wilkerson. Briman had decided a year prior to the summer 2020 sale that he wanted to retire. With a pandemic in full force, he had plenty of questions and concerns. “We had no real way to know if we were going to be successful or have a failure on our hands,” says Briman. “We didn’t know what to expect.” But with Wilkerson in charge, the experience was “fantastic” and now there’s plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying a more secure retirement. “I would recommend Wilkerson to any retailer considering a going-out-of-business sale,” says Briman. “They’ll help you reach your financial goal. Our experience was a tremendous success.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular

Columns

A Very Different Customer Service Model

mm

Published

on

A story appeared over the weekend in the New York Times about a business that has a very different sort of customer service model. (Read the story here.)

I’m not going to refer to the company by name for reasons that will be apparent momentarily, or if you read the article. 

The business is an online eyeglasses retailer that sells the highest-end brands and also happens to rank highest among Google searches — higher, in fact, than many eyeglass manufacturers’ own websites. How’d this company get so high up in the rankings? By providing the absolute worst customer service possible.

Yep, you read that right. The company stocks no eyeglass frames. When an order comes in, it scours eBay and other sites to find frames that are close to what the customer ordered — maybe legitimate, maybe counterfeit. In this business model, it doesn’t really matter. When complaints roll in, the owner of the company comes out swinging, using foul language, threatening lawsuits until the customer shuts up, or, more likely, vents his frustrations on the many consumer review and complaints sites out there. Anytime this company’s name registers on one of those sites, lo and behold, the algorithms of the highest-tech search engine out there pick up on the buzz on that company (never mind that it’s negative buzz) and ranks it higher in the search findings.

On the bright side of what’s a pretty shocking business model, the company’s owner says it’s very tiring being that belligerent. Maybe he’ll wear himself out.

Advertisement

Meantime, it’s just another reason to favor the traditional bricks and mortar store. And if you do read the NYT story, make sure you don’t pick up any tips; better read INSTORE for those!

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

Retirement Made Easy with Wilkerson

The store was a landmark in Topeka, Kansas, but after 80 years in business, it was time for Briman’s Leading Jewelers to close up shop. Third generation jeweler and owner Rob Briman says the decision wasn’t easy, but the sale that followed was — all thanks to Wilkerson. Briman had decided a year prior to the summer 2020 sale that he wanted to retire. With a pandemic in full force, he had plenty of questions and concerns. “We had no real way to know if we were going to be successful or have a failure on our hands,” says Briman. “We didn’t know what to expect.” But with Wilkerson in charge, the experience was “fantastic” and now there’s plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying a more secure retirement. “I would recommend Wilkerson to any retailer considering a going-out-of-business sale,” says Briman. “They’ll help you reach your financial goal. Our experience was a tremendous success.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular