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Ask INSTORE: April 2012

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Advertising strategies in a new world, the insurance impact of having a kids’ playroom, and more.

Ask Instore: Where Diamonds Go to Rest

BY THE INSTORE TEAM

Published in the April 2012 issue

Q:We can’t figure out the best use of our limited ad dollars. Traditional media seems to be becoming dated and ineffective. What do you recommend?

A:Don’t be too quick to give up on traditional media — some of the most basic ways of getting your message out are still the best. We’d suggest that you put your efforts and dollars into the following:

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  • A good sign that people can actually see: Yes, there’s nothing more fundamental, but if you have good drive-by traffic this should be the first thing you get right
  • Direct mail. Build a mailing list and send customers a postcard every few months. Announce sales, offer a jewelry-maintenance tip and solicit repair work. Ironically, the more pervasive e-mail has become, the more willing people have become to take a second look at the “junk mail” (sorry) in their mailbox.
  • Invest in a really good website and sign up for an e-mail marketing service (Constant Contact, Chimpmail) to keep customers updated with your events, sales offers and new lines. Your goal should be top-of-mind awareness in your market. Jewelry is still a milestone business. You want people to think of you first when they have an occasion to celebrate.
SHOWCASES

We do many private shows for fundraisers. I am looking to rent or buy cheap showcases for our upcoming events. Where can I get them?

Tough one. Cases are nearly always an expensive proposition, says retail consultant David Geller. “The only good price is if you can find jewelers who have already gone out of business and are storing the showcases and are willing to rent them to you,” he says, adding however that transportation is still a big expense. Dollar-wise you might be better off buying some used ones and storing them for future events. His final suggestion:

Try the clearance section at griceshowcase.com.

ENGRAVING

We would like to offer engraving.

Are there any first-time pitfalls?

Most of the perils in engraving come down to a single issue: Communication. Rege Vogan, who has more than two decades of engraving experience working for retail, institutional and corporate clients, says you must make sure you engrave exactly what the customer wants. “I have the customer write down what they want engraved. Then I re-write it to make sure it’s what they want,” he says. Vogan, who with his wife co-owns Vogan Gold & Silver Works in Colorado Springs, CO, also advises you:

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  • Ensure placement of the engraving. “What you think and what the customer wants could be two different things,” he says.
  • Check the piece you are engraving for any marks or damage so the customer is aware of them before they leave the piece to be engraved.
  • If the object is made of glass, be sure the customer is aware that there can be air bubbles in the glass and that it could break. The chance of this happening is remote. “But you know the saying, If you don’t warn your customer it will happen,” he says.

INSURANCE

Is it true our insurance premiums will go up if we add a kids’ room?

The short answer: Probably not. “From an insurance perspective, having a kids room may increase some exposures, but may also reduce others,” says Jewelers Mutual Insurance Co.’s communications officer Jessica VandenHouten, adding that the company doesn’t make a point of asking if a store owner has such an area.

TARDINESS

I’ve heard the late fees and extra interest

we pay to vendors are tax-deductible

expenses? What about the IRS’s late

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filing penalty?

It’s true that interest, late fees, and penalties are all considered legitimate business expenses. But not IRS penalties. But why are you paying delinquency penalties in the first place? If you can’t get an extension and don’t have the cash, you should still submit a return by the deadline — then you’ll have to pay only the 0.5 percent per month rate for being late. Late filing is a symptom of a financial carelessness that doesn’t auger well for your company.

Want to get in on the idea sharing among Brain Squad members? Join up at instoremag.com/brainsquad


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Wilkerson Testimonials

New York Jeweler Picks Wilkerson for Their GOB Sale

Jan Rose of Rose Jewelers, located in Long Island's famous Hamptons beach district, explains how she chose Wilkerson for her closing sale. Jan's suggestions: reach out to jewelers who have been in similar situations to find out what worked for them, and look for a company with experience in going-out-of-business sales. Once you've done that, the final step is to move ahead and trust the process.

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Ask INSTORE

How to Prepare for 2019, Finding a Good CPA and More of Your Questions Answered

London Business School prof advises, “Keep your vision fuzzy and your priorities clear.”

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The sales experts you quote often recommend role-playing exercises. But my sales staff always slinks away when I suggest them. How can I get them to play along?

That may be because the focus is negative, says Dave Richardson of Jewelry Sales Training. Make the role-playing positive and fun. First, play the role of the salesperson and let your salespeople critique you. Then, when it’s your turn to play the customer, instead of saying, “Here’s what you did wrong,” start off by telling the person what you felt they did well and what you would change if you had the opportunity. Always finish on a positive, encouraging note, Richardson says.

Podcast: Holiday Sales These Jewelers Will Never Forget
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Podcast: Holiday Sales These Jewelers Will Never Forget

Podcast: Get Your Employees to Act Like They Own the Damn Place
JimmyCast

Podcast: Get Your Employees to Act Like They Own the Damn Place

Podcast: A Classic Holiday Poem is Reimagined in a Jewelry Store
Over the Counter

Podcast: A Classic Holiday Poem is Reimagined in a Jewelry Store

Our marketing team’s images were recently lifted and used by the vendor for their advertising without crediting us. When I contacted them, they said, “We’re sorry; it was the intern’s fault.” How should I handle this?

If it was “the intern’s fault,” who approved the final vendor layouts? But regardless of whose fault it is, you should get some compensation for the use of your images, says consultant Kate Peterson. The vendor would have paid for the images had they used any other marketing professional to create them, so they should have no issue with paying your in-house team. “I would suggest that the retailer assign a fair price (what she typically pays her team per image) and send an invoice directly to the head of the company with pics of their ads and an explanation. If applicable, tell them you will apply the amount of the invoice against an outstanding balance,” says Peterson.

“The key here is to remain positive and confident, as opposed to challenging. Assume they are expecting to compensate, and communicate in a tone that expresses confidence in their interest in doing the right thing.”

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2019 seems like it’s going to be a volatile year. What should we do to get ready?

Eight years of economic growth and cheap credit allowed many business owners to gaze far into the future and craft successful, long-term strategies, but it does seem those times are coming to an end as trade wars, rising interest rates, political turmoil, spooked financial markets and ongoing technological change cast a shadow over what otherwise is still a strong economy. In such a shifting, unstable environment where visibility is low, Donald Sull, a London Business School professor, recommends “active waiting.” Contemplate alternative techniques, explore likely scenarios and focus on general readiness. This is a time of threat but also opportunity. “Keep your vision fuzzy and your priorities clear,” Sull says. “Maintain a war chest and battle-ready troops. Know when to wait — and when to strike. When you grab an opportunity or move to crush a threat, amass all your resources behind the effort.” At the same time, continue making routine operational improvements such as cutting costs, strengthening distribution, and improving products and services. “Though mundane, these initiatives foster efficiency, which can position you to snatch a golden opportunity from rivals’ jaws,” Sull says. It all sounds rather dramatic, but then high drama surely awaits.

Where do I find the best CPA?

There are more than a few sloppy accountants around, so it pays to be picky. A good CPA will be a stickler for details and accuracy and very time-conscious. So a useful initial indicator is how long it takes them to reply to your first inquiry (although if it’s April 10, cut them some slack). Look for someone with a history of working with small businesses, but be careful about relying too much on the recommendations of business friends. Draw up a list of three or four prospects and make a decision after you’ve sat down and discussed your particular needs with each of them. If they want to charge for the time, look elsewhere. Final word of wisdom: as good as the person may be, never abdicate your responsibility to know what’s going on with your finances. Get tax smart.

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Is it legal for retailers to say they are selling at wholesale prices?

In short, no — unless they really are. Many states, including Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Texas, California, New York, and Michigan, have strict laws prohibiting the use of the word “wholesale” in retail advertisements. In some states, this is a criminal offense, due to the word’s ability to mislead consumers. “If a jeweler advertises it is selling at wholesale prices, it must sell at the wholesale price,” says the Jewelers Vigilance Committee. Some states define this as the price the jeweler paid for the item from the supplier. Other states, and the federal government, say the price must be lower than the average price retailers would pay in the area.

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Why That Minor May Be Eligible for a Refund and More of Your Questions Answered

It’s always good to be at the right side of the law.

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One of our employees is starting to show signs of his age. He’s losing his hearing and seems to be getting more forgetful. He wants to work until age 70 — three more years. What do we do?

This is a tough one. You want to be loyal, and don’t want to be perceived as cold-hearted, but you and your business can’t afford sales-floor errors or to allow other employees see you tolerate costly mistakes. The best strategy is to stay focused on performance, not the person. Treat your older associates the same as you would your younger ones. “Deal with issues for what they are — not for the reasons behind them,” says Kate Peterson, president of Performance Concepts. For example, if your older associate hears something incorrectly and his actions lead to a customer problem, address the immediate issue — the customer problem — regardless of the underlying cause. A person can easily deny that his hearing or memory is failing, but he cannot deny the obvious outcome. If you decide your store can’t continue to support a failing employee, consider investing in a retirement package. Perhaps you could employ the associate as a “goodwill ambassador” for your store. If you decide it’s time to part ways, ensure every detail is handled correctly. “Clearly defined performance standards, daily coaching and fair rewards and consequences must be applied consistently for all associates. You can’t terminate an employee for failing hearing or memory — but if necessary, you can for continued failure to deliver to the job requirements,” Peterson says.

Podcast: Holiday Sales These Jewelers Will Never Forget
Over the Counter

Podcast: Holiday Sales These Jewelers Will Never Forget

Podcast: Get Your Employees to Act Like They Own the Damn Place
JimmyCast

Podcast: Get Your Employees to Act Like They Own the Damn Place

Podcast: A Classic Holiday Poem is Reimagined in a Jewelry Store
Over the Counter

Podcast: A Classic Holiday Poem is Reimagined in a Jewelry Store

I carry two competing brands in a fairly narrow, small-dollar jewelry category. Now one of them is implying I should drop the other slightly-less-popular brand or it will cut off supply. Is this legal?

There are some instances when you could take such a case to court and expect to win — such as when an unreasonable restraint of trade or similar antitrust violation can be established, or when a store’s ability to conduct business is damaged, say, supply is cut off after you’ve invested heavily in marketing and training, and the brand accounts for a big portion of sales. But for the most part, these are exceptions; the law allows a miffed vendor to cut you off cold. “In general, companies in the U.S. are free to decide when to do business and when to stop doing business with another company,” says attorney Barbara Mandell, a member of Dykema Gossett PLLC, which focuses on antitrust law.

I have a no-return guarantee on all my products. But somebody told me that if a minor buys jewelry from me, it is possible for them to return it for a full refund and I can’t do anything about it. Is this true?

Yes, says Elly Rosen, director and founder of the Appraisers Information Network. “The bottom line is that selling to a minor may leave us at the whim of the minor,” says Rosen. He notes that numerous court decisions have supported the long-standing “common law” understanding that minors do not have the capacity to contract. This means that while a sale may have been made, it might not be an enforceable contract if challenged. If you sell to a minor they, their parent, or other legal guardian can demand return of monies paid. And that’s not all. Says Rosen: “In many jurisdictions the minor will only have to return ‘whatever they can.’” Whatever is left! So, even if an item is damaged, they might only have to return what’s left and may still be entitled to get all their money back.

As I start my financial planning for 2019, do you recommend a bottom-up or top-down approach?

It’s a new year, a new beginning … start at the bottom. “Top down is quicker but invariably leads to existing costs being left in rather than being properly evaluated,” says David Brown, CEO of the Edge Retail Academy. Brown explains that when he works with clients, he asks his clients to set the financial goals they want to achieve and then work “backwards” to determine the sales and earnings they are going to need to achieve those targets. “This results in a complete budgeting process,” he says. “If an owner has planned a retirement nest egg in 10 years and they know they need $50,000 into a retirement plan each year to reach the goal, it provides them with the incentive to hit the sales target each year.”

What kind of discount should I give my bookkeeper on my merchandise, given that she knows exactly how much I paid for it?

We’d say very little. Your bookkeeper should be a pro who understands how discounts impact your bottom line. If she asks for a “good price,” offer her the employee discount or trade merchandise for her services. And to keep it fair for both parties, trade full retail for full retail. Unless your bookkeeper is willing to discount her services, you should not feel obliged to cut the price of her purchases.

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How to Find Good Employees, Reward Customers and Answer Phones — Plus More Reader Questions

There are no shortcuts made to quickly fill a staff gap.

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How can I find millennials who will take the job seriously?

It is possible to shape millennial hires into serious salespeople, but, as Joshua Pruschen, manager of Maxon Fine Jewelry in Springfield, MO, notes, you’ve got to take hiring seriously yourself, first. That means no shortcuts made to quickly fill a staff gap. Figure out who the job candidate is before he or she shows up for the first interview. Before the interview, ask each candidate to take a personality and skills assessment; then, interview them two or three times. Make sure they’re interested in and capable of committing to a career.

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An employee keeps telling me she is frustrated with different aspects of her sales job. How do I respond?

Start with her. Ask her what she thinks the answer is. If that doesn’t yield anything helpful or realistic, ask her to come up with three lists made up of:

The good stuff. The part of the job that makes her feel worthy, satisfied or accomplished.

The everyday parts of the job — those things that don’t suck and are part of pulling a pay check.

The “Ugh, I hate this!” stuff that is frustrating her. Put these into three buckets and then find ways, together, to spend 10 percent less time on the “ugh” stuff in Bucket C and increase by 10 percent time spent on the engaging activities in Bucket A. Of course, sometimes she’s just going to have to suck it up and do the ugh jobs but at least you’ve gone the extra yard. The point of this exercise isn’t to pander to your staff. People do better jobs when they’re doing what energizes them. And you may be surprised what excites an individual: some people get a kick out of filling in spreadsheets. Others enjoy the challenge of a cold call.

I have a small store. What’s the protocol when you’re busy and the phone rings? Answer the call and put it on hold, or let it go to voicemail?

This is really about personal preference. But Pauline Blachford of Pauline Blachford Consulting prefers the latter for two reasons: the customer you are serving at the time the phone rings (or even the job you are working on at the bench) deserves your undivided attention. And often, the caller who just has a “quick” question usually takes time. This can be frustrating for both you and the customer in the store. “This also breaks the train of thought of the service provider and causes a disconnect between the two,” she adds.

However, Blachford says that if you do choose to always pick up and put the caller on hold, then be sure to ask their permission to be put on hold. When it comes to voicemail, the greatest fear for incoming callers is that they never know when their call will be returned. For this reason, Blachford recommends the recording say something like: “Thank you for calling ABC Jewelers. We are presently taking care of another client. Your call is important to us. Please leave your name and number, and we will get back to you within the hour.” In committing to the hour, it sets the precedent that every team member knows that accessing those messages and responding ASAP is the top priority. Lastly, she offers this bit of advice: “The phone should always be answered by the third ring whether picked up in person or the answering service.”

The banker who has always handled our account and knows our business is moving to a larger lender. Should we follow him or stay with our existing bank?

It’s never just about the bank or just about the banker. Smaller banks are usually set up to allow you to develop more personal relationships with their officers, while a larger bank will have a wider range of products, be more secure (in theory) and will be able to offer nationwide or even international services should you need them. The most important thing is that your banker has influence within his or her institution. He or she needs to be able to get things done, either through his professional credibility, knowledge or connections. Talk to the banker. Ask him if he feels his new bank will be the right fit for you.

Is it absolutely necessary to reconcile our books to the last penny?

There are some areas where you can disregard small discrepancies, but when it comes to reconciling the bank account to the general ledger, you need to be “bang on all the time,” says David Brown of the Edge Retail Academy. It primarily has to do with security: a common embezzlement technique is to skim small, seemingly random amounts of cash from revenue. Over the years, these mysterious discrepancies can add up to tens of thousands of dollars. Keeping everything in order shouldn’t be that hard if you’ve computerized your accounting and your checking account reconciliation.

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