Connect with us

Best of The Best

Best of the Best: Free Weddings

Published

on

Albert’s Diamond Jewelers

Schererville, IN

Valentine’s Day engagements are a welcome tradition for jewelers, of course, that can bring a flurry of post-December sales. At Albert’s Diamond Jewelers, a family-owned company in Schererville, IN, Valentine’s Day weddings have become a tradition, too.

This year, on the day before Valentine’s Day, a couple came to Albert’s and bought a $14,000 engagement ring. When they announced plans to wed at city hall, says Albert’s president Joshua Halpern, he was thrilled to be able to tell them, “You can get married here tomorrow!”

“So they ran down to the courthouse to get a wedding license and came back the next day.”

Sixteen couples in all got married in the store this year on Feb. 14.
Advertisement

IDEA

A Sentimental Gesture

Josh Halpern’s parents, Fred and Donna Halpern, were married 47 years ago on Valentine’s Day, making the holiday a sentimental one for the whole family. The tradition of holding free wedding ceremonies at the store began in 1998 when Fred and Donna decided to renew their wedding vows there. “We’re in the love business and what better way to help our customers share their love than to offer free wedding ceremonies on the national day of love, Valentine’s Day?” Josh Halpern says.

“I thought if we could expand it to include pieces from other jewelers, it would make a bigger impact and raise more for Massey,” says Fornash.

EXECUTION

A Beautiful Place to Wed

At 21,000 square feet, the company’s flagship store is one of the largest jewelry stores in the U.S . The store has 120 employees, but Halpern says the nuptials are planned and organized by just three staff members. Much of the responsibility includes finding partners to donate everything needed for the weddings — cake, music, flowers and champagne for the newlyweds and their guests.

Couples don’t even have to buy their rings at the store to be eligible for a wedding, which can be arranged in as little as a day.

Although there is no dress code, most brides wear wedding gowns or cocktail dresses, and their grooms dress formally, as well.

“It’s a beautiful setting,” Halpern says, “We built a beautiful chapel in the store. It’s much nicer than going to the justice of the peace.”

Albert’s sets up about 50 chairs for spectators, and the weddings are open to the public. Wedding parties in the store have brought along as many as 75 people.

Advertisement

REWARDS

Fostering Relationships

Halpern has witnessed more than 300 couples wed in the store over the years. Most years, 20 to 30 couples sign up for an in-store ceremony.
Couples do not have to buy their rings in the store — or anything else — to be eligible to get married there, but the event does build loyalty and foster relationships.

“The community loves it,” Halpern says. “People who were married here come back and thank me on Valentine’s Day. It’s overwhelming the gratitude we see for doing things like this.”

Do It Yourself: A Place to Marry

Halpern says several of his jeweler friends have tried Valentine’s Day wedding ceremonies and it’s worked well in a variety of stores.

He suggests jewelers make friends with local media when planning this kind of event.

“We work with the local newspaper and call them about everything we’re doing,” he says. “We always have reporters and photographers in our store, and we make sure we spend money with them. We advertise. There’s still a real need for newspapers, especially in a community like ours.”

Assign a couple of staff members to coordinate partnerships with other local businesses, who may be delighted to provide music, photos, champagne and flowers.

Advertisement

Eileen McClelland is the Managing Editor of INSTORE. She believes that every jewelry store has the power of cool within them.

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

To Generate Funds for a Jeweler’s Move and Remodel, Wilkerson More Than Delivered

Even successful jewelers need a little extra cash to fund expansion plans—especially when there’s inventory on hand that’s ripe for liquidation. For Beaumont, Texas-based jeweler Michael Price, co-owner of Mathews Jewelers, it was the perfect time to call Wilkerson. Price talked to other jewelers as well as vendors for advice during the selection process and decided to go with Wilkerson. And he wasn’t disappointed. When it comes to paying for the move and expansion, Price says the road ahead is clear. “When we close on the next two stores, there’s no worries about finances.”

Promoted Headlines

Best of The Best

Washington D.C. Jeweler Honors 50-Year-Old Gift Certificate

Gesture generates goodwill.

Published

on

WHEN KEN STEIN, owner of Bensons Jewelers in Washington, DC, got a call in November from a customer asking if he carried silverware, of course he automatically said no, followed by, “Gosh! Who does anymore?”

But the caller, George Jones, said he hoped to redeem a 1969 gift certificate for three silver pieces that he and his wife, Cathy, had received for their wedding and lost track of. The Maryland couple, who were preparing to celebrate their 50th anniversary, found the certificate in a wedding album and decided to see if it might be possible to redeem it.

The certificate was for “one teaspoon, one place knife and one place fork in ‘Rose’ by Stieff.”

The couple discovered that the factory that made the flatware had closed in 2007, so they decided to check to see if the jewelry store was still there. When they found out it was, they were further intrigued, as was Stein.

“Well, my business brain ran with that,” says Stein, who promised “100 percnet” to honor it and found the three pieces online for $150.

He decided it was a story worth promoting and media attention quickly led to widespread accolades.

Two TV reporters and a reporter from the Washington Post visited his store to meet him and hear the story. From the Washington D.C. NBC affiliate, the story also aired in New York and Boston.

“It has been remarkable the amount of calls I have received,” Stein says. “They are so heartfelt and literally made me choke up at times. Calls from New York, California, Connecticut and elsewhere. I had a call from a little old lady in California who told me I restored her faith in humanity. She literally tugged at my heart a little bit.”

Stein says that while he knew it would make a great story, he also felt like it was the right thing to do. “One customer came in just to shake my hand,” he says.

One of the emails he received read, “I must commend your company for honoring a 50 year-old gift certificate. I’m sure the value of those three pieces of silver has increased over the last 50 years. That was very kind of you. If I need any jewelry, I will gladly drive the distance to shop at your store. God Bless You!”

One call, though, from someone else wanting to buy silver from him left him shaking his head. “I literally said, are you kidding?! Go buy it yourself!”

Stein’s father, Paul Stein, bought the business in the ‘50s and worked through the ‘90s. Ken Stein joined the business in 1979. “I’m trying to remember, did they have any silver left? I truly don’t remember that. I would imagine in the early ‘70s, it just faded out.”

The Joneses told the NBC affiliate in Washington that they plan to put the silver and the old gift certificate on display in their house, so they, too, can share the remarkable story.

PHOTO GALLERY (6 IMAGES)

{{gallery_holder}}

Continue Reading

Best of The Best

This Jeweler Set Up Shop In Grand Central Station

Her travel-themed jewelry is a hit with tourists and locals alike.

Published

on

FAR-FLUNG ADVENTURES and an affinity for whimsy inspired Nicole Parker King’s creation of a line of jewelry with a travel theme.

She’s visited more than 50 countries, and like many a peripatetic traveler, is always searching for a treasure to remind her of a favorite destination.

“I was looking for something small, chic, collectible and wearable that would remind me of my most special memories on my travels,” she says. “You can sometimes find charms in different locations, but there was nothing that covered all of the places I’d been, so I had to create it.”

Advertisement

She launched her wanderlust-inspired Jet Set Candy jewelry collection in 2014 featuring luggage-tag charms and charms depicting airplanes, mermaids, seashells, in silver, gold-plated and 14K gold. The jewelry was sold on her own website and in boutiques and gift shops across the U.S. The packaging is bright and plush. The whole collection is presented in a passport-style book with photos and pricing.

“We really did pretty awesomely from the get-go,” she says. But something was missing.

“I don’t think it’s possible to build a true brand just living online, digital only,” she says. “People need to experience the physicality of a space for a brand to exist and for people to care about it. We’ve done a lot of pop-ups in the past but hated the transient nature of only having the pop-ups.”

In July, she opened a 316-square-foot store in New York’s Grand Central Terminal, and for the first time was able to fine-tune visual merchandising to reflect the brand’s playfulness.

There’s a lot going on in the small space, including perfect Instagram opportunities: A 6-foot-tall hot pink Statue of Liberty, and a closet transformed into a travel shrine with a floor-to-ceiling, travel-inspired collage.

There’s a mint-green ceiling, travel quotes on the walls and a custom-designed backlit cash wrap highlighting a map of the world. The store also features an engraving machine on site for personalization. Consumers shop by continental regions, creating a unique flow to the experience. The overall theme of “The World” is juxtaposed with “New York City.”

Advertisement

A central island is dedicated to all things New York as well as rings with travel-themed slogans and necklaces spelling out “wanderlust.”

“People have seemed delighted to stumble upon it, and long-time customers are excited we have a permanent home for the brand,” King says. “I think there is always going to be a place, especially for jewelry, to see the product up close and try it on. No place is better than Grand Central for our audience, which is a good mix of tourists and New Yorkers.”

Nicole Parker King

King, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, studied graphic design and has career experience in branding. She lived with her husband, a diplomat, in India, where she learned about jewelry from artisans. Her jewelry designs are heavy with graphics and she does all the technical drawings.

Although Jet Set Candy is her first foray into jewelry, she’s loved it all of her life. “I had my own charm bracelet when I was a kid, a sterling bracelet from James Avery.

“My favorite type of jewelry is whimsical quirky pieces that tell stories and have the smile factor.”

The long-term plan is to open additional stores in airports. But short-term, she’d like to try pop-ups to test target destinations including Los Angeles, London and Las Vegas.

Continue Reading

Best of The Best

Tacos, Tequila and Tattoos: Gold Casters’ Contest Draws a Diverse Crowd in Bloomington, IN

Unusual event infuses King Baby jewelry line launch with excitement.

Published

on

Flyers combined with a radio and social-media marketing campaign created interest.

FINE JEWELRY STORES often face the challenge of balancing elegance with approachability. Tequila, tacos and tattoos go a long way toward melting the ice, discovered Brad Lawrence of Gold Casters Fine Jewelry in Bloomington, IN.

Lawrence, who specializes in bridal jewelry and high-end watches, found a fun way to break down those threshold barriers on a Saturday with, of all things, a social-media-friendly tattoo contest to introduce the jewelry line King Baby.

Lawrence considered it the perfect complement for King Baby, which he describes as having an edgy biker look. In addition, he surmised that people who like to adorn their body with works of art would also find a deep personal connection with jewelry.

“We are what would be called a guild jeweler, and we are always trying to look for ideas that are more on the casual side,” Lawrence says. “Most of our events in the past have been black-tie or at least more traditional.” Yet Bloomington, IN, is a college town where students make up a significant percentage of the 100,000 population.

He called the event Tacos, Tequila and Tattoos.

Once he had conceived the idea, Lawrence worked with his affiliated marketing experts on getting the word out. The store placed flyers with a Harley Davidson dealer and biker bars, along with a bevy of print and social media marketing created by Porte Marketing. The event was also promoted with a radio campaign orchestrated by Roy Williams.

On the day of the event, margarita-sipping shoppers lined up for the taco bar, purchased pieces from the jewelry collection and were invited to share the story of their tattoos with the store staff, who judged the contest. Each participant received a $25 gift certificate. The contest winner received a $250 gift certificate.

Those who shared their tattoo stories defied any stereotypical expectations. “It was a much more diverse crowd than I would have expected,” Lawrence says. “We had people in their 60s and 70s with tattoos. Some people had full sleeves.

Several people had investments of $10,000 or more in tattoos.

“The event was very inclusive of our community and yet brought in a different demographic for us. It was a way of gaining new customers and having people feel more comfortable. Without question, 90 percent of the people we saw that day were new faces.”

After the event, the marketing team invited others among the tattoo-clad Bloomington population to share photos and stories of their tattoos on Gold Casters’ social media, continuing to give participants $25 gift certificates and also selecting an online winner by Facebook vote, who was awarded another $250 gift certificate.

The stories behind the tattoos turned out to be fascinating, Lawrence says, and in all about 100 people shared their stories in store or online with photos or videos.

King Baby is known as a men’s line, primarily, which the store needs, but it also has the magical versatility of being unisex. “We turned our entire investment in the line,” he says. “We sold all of the highest-end pieces we had in stock.”

The event attracted media coverage on social channels, on the radio and in the newspaper. “It was very well received by the community. People are still talking about it today.”

PHOTO GALLERY (7 IMAGES)

{{gallery_holder}}

Continue Reading

Most Popular