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David Brown

Is Your Jewelry Store Really Making a Profit?

Your financial reports tell one story. Your effort another.

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DOES YOUR jewelry business really make a profit? This question normally only gets answered annually when the financial reports come back from the CPA and often raises the question: Where has all the money gone?

But in this article we aren’t just taking into account the results from a financial-reporting viewpoint. When looking at the financial reports it’s important to add back any non-trading expenses (or non-trading income) to get a fair answer  on business performance.

As part of tax planning, most CPAs will allocate income to owners or even family members to spread income and minimize tax. These allocations, however, may not reflect the fair contributions made to the business.

If you want to determine the business results you are achieving, add back any wage allocation that has been made to show the full business profit. Then you need to deduct a fair wage for all parties involved to show the true profit after exertion.

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When discussing end-of-year results, many business owners forget the return they make must be measured against two components:

Return on Investment: How much money has been invested in the store? There is a cost to any business ownership and that’s not only the cost of the investment but the opportunity cost of putting your money elsewhere. ROI needs to be based on the current value of the business investment, i.e. if the store were sold today how much money would there be to invest elsewhere? Based on this figure a return of between 20-30 percent needs to be achieved to reflect the fair risk involved with being a business owner. Some argue this percentage is too high given current interest rates. But I would counter with the view that business is more risky than it was five years ago and as such the risk premium, the difference between bank interest rates and the ROI you should seek, justifies this level of return.

Return on Effort: This part often goes uncounted. Owners are notoriously bad for discounting or even disregarding the time and effort they put into their stores. In reality, there is a cost to this — and again an opportunity cost of working elsewhere. What would you pay someone to do the hours you do and have the responsibilities you have.

So calculate the ROI you would expect from the money you have in your store. Add on the wages you or others would deserve for doing what you do. Then look at the total.

How does that compare to your profit for last year?

David Brown is the President of The Edge Retail Academy (sister company of The Edge), who provide expert consulting services to help with all facets of your business including inventory management, staffing, sales techniques, financial growth and retirement planning...All custom-tailored to your store’s needs. By utilizing the power of The Edge, we analyze major Key Performance Indicators that point to your store’s current challenges and future opportunities. Edge Pulse is the ideal add-on to the Edge, to better understand critical sales and inventory data to improve business profitability. It benchmarks your store against 1100+ other Edge Users and ensures you stay on top of market trends. 877-569-8657, Ext. 001 or [email protected] or www.EdgeRetailAcademy.com

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Celebrate Your Retirement with Wilkerson

For nearly three decades, Suzanne and Tom Arnold ran a successful business at Facets Fine Jewelry in Arlington, Va. But the time came when the Arnolds wanted to do some of the things you put off while you’ve got a business to run. “We decided it was time to retire,” says Suzanne, who claims the couple knew how to open a store, how to run a store but “didn’t know how to close a store.” So, they hired Wilkerson to do it for them. When she called, Suzanne says Wilkerson offered every option for the sale she could have hoped for. Better still, “the sale exceeded our financial goals like crazy,” she says. And customers came, not only to take advantage of the going-out-of-business buys and mark-downs, but to wish a bon voyage to the beloved proprietors of a neighborhood institution. “People were celebrating our retirement, and that was so special,” says says.

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