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David Geller: Get Your Employees To Do Their Chores

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Margins are falling everywhere except here.


This article originally appeared in the October 2015 edition of INSTORE.

You’re the boss and you expect everyone to be as diligent as you in keeping the store clean. That means carpets vacuumed, glass shiny and smudge-free, garbage emptied and toilets cleaned.

But you’ll always have someone who never does his chores, and there are always one or two puppy dogs: “I’ll do whatever you want, master! Pick me, pick me!” Which is pretty unfair even though they are willing.

So instead of yelling at the staff about why things aren’t done, we made a schedule of what had to be done. Rather than giving employees tasks that some would hate and some wouldn’t do, we put tasks into groups and divided the staff into groups.

We did allow sales staff to “own” their own showcases when putting out the jewelry every morning.

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We placed into each group some easy and some not so easy tasks so one employee didn’t get all the easy ones and another get “toilet and vacuum duty” every time.

Here’s an example of tasks for four groups:

GROUP 1

a. Vacuum daily.

b. Make sure refreshments in showroom are replenished/coffee/lemonade/cookies/clean refreshment area.

c. Make coffee for kitchen area.

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d. Check if we need to order kitchen supplies/paper products.

GROUP 2

a. Arrange catalogs neatly.

b. Clean glass on all showcases before opening, at lunch and at 4 p.m.

c. Check once a week for ample stock of ring boxes/wrap and bows.

GROUP 3

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a. Clean bathrooms/toilets/kitchen area.

b. Empty all garbage cans.

GROUP 4

a. Make sure every showcase/station has pens/calculators/Geller price book/ring sticks/job envelopes.

b. Call customers with jobs finished yesterday to come and get their work.

c. Clean glass in front windows and doors.

d. Sweep sidewalk in front of store door.

Now that we have these groups, we rotated them so no one always had a grungy job. Each week someone had a different group and it took four weeks before you did the same thing again. We placed it on a calendar with staff members’ names.

So now everyone knows his or her chores each week and it rotates. Then when I go out to the floor and see the front windows were not cleaned, instead of yelling “Why can’t you guys keep this place clean?” or picking on my “go-to person,” I just look at the list and see that Group 4 was responsible for cleaning the front store windows.

I then go to the showroom and say, “Who has Group 4 this week?”

Max says “That’s me.”

“Max, you missed cleaning the front windows. Hop to it, please. Fair is fair.

 


.


David Geller is a consultant to jewelers on store management. Email him at dgellerbellsouth.net.

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular

David Geller

David Geller: Get Your Employees To Do Their Chores

mm

Published

on

Margins are falling everywhere except here.


This article originally appeared in the October 2015 edition of INSTORE.

You’re the boss and you expect everyone to be as diligent as you in keeping the store clean. That means carpets vacuumed, glass shiny and smudge-free, garbage emptied and toilets cleaned.

But you’ll always have someone who never does his chores, and there are always one or two puppy dogs: “I’ll do whatever you want, master! Pick me, pick me!” Which is pretty unfair even though they are willing.

So instead of yelling at the staff about why things aren’t done, we made a schedule of what had to be done. Rather than giving employees tasks that some would hate and some wouldn’t do, we put tasks into groups and divided the staff into groups.

Advertisement

We did allow sales staff to “own” their own showcases when putting out the jewelry every morning.

We placed into each group some easy and some not so easy tasks so one employee didn’t get all the easy ones and another get “toilet and vacuum duty” every time.

Here’s an example of tasks for four groups:

GROUP 1

a. Vacuum daily.

b. Make sure refreshments in showroom are replenished/coffee/lemonade/cookies/clean refreshment area.

Advertisement

c. Make coffee for kitchen area.

d. Check if we need to order kitchen supplies/paper products.

GROUP 2

a. Arrange catalogs neatly.

b. Clean glass on all showcases before opening, at lunch and at 4 p.m.

c. Check once a week for ample stock of ring boxes/wrap and bows.

Advertisement

GROUP 3

a. Clean bathrooms/toilets/kitchen area.

b. Empty all garbage cans.

GROUP 4

a. Make sure every showcase/station has pens/calculators/Geller price book/ring sticks/job envelopes.

b. Call customers with jobs finished yesterday to come and get their work.

c. Clean glass in front windows and doors.

d. Sweep sidewalk in front of store door.

Now that we have these groups, we rotated them so no one always had a grungy job. Each week someone had a different group and it took four weeks before you did the same thing again. We placed it on a calendar with staff members’ names.

So now everyone knows his or her chores each week and it rotates. Then when I go out to the floor and see the front windows were not cleaned, instead of yelling “Why can’t you guys keep this place clean?” or picking on my “go-to person,” I just look at the list and see that Group 4 was responsible for cleaning the front store windows.

I then go to the showroom and say, “Who has Group 4 this week?”

Max says “That’s me.”

“Max, you missed cleaning the front windows. Hop to it, please. Fair is fair.

 


.


David Geller is a consultant to jewelers on store management. Email him at dgellerbellsouth.net.

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular