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David Geller

David Geller: Super Service

Turn the satisfied into the enthusiastic, says David Geller.

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I’VE NEVER MET a jeweler who didn’t think he gave awesome customer service. So what’s the difference between a satisfied customer and one who is flat-out enthusiastic about your store?

Enthusiastic customers buy more, and better yet, refer their friends. This is a no-cost acquisition of a new client. Here are some examples of the two:

Customer Experience 1

Customer picks up a custom design ring.
Satisfied: Ring is given in a nice box, along with an appraisal.
Enthusiastic: You tell the customer you live on referrals from wonderful customers like her. You tell her you’d be appreciative if she’d hand out some of your business cards.

Before she came in you took a picture of her ring. At Office Depot you bought business-card blanks and with a software program ran off a few cards for your store. But instead of using your logo you used the picture of her ring as the company logo! Even if she doesn’t wear the jewelry to work, you know she’ll be handing out your card so she can show off her jewelry.

Write her name on the back of the card. If a referral comes in with the card, send the original customer a thank-you and gift certificate to the store.

Customer Experience 2

New customer says, “Mary Jones told me you do nice work.”
Satisfied: You say, “Thank you” and deliver a good-looking job as promised.
Enthusiastic: You send a handwritten note to Mary Jones thanking her for the new customer and enclose either a $25 gift certificate to your store or a $25 gift card for a nice restaurant. If she takes her friends with her to the restaurant, everyone at the table will hear who treated them to dessert — her jeweler!

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Customer Experience 3

First-time customer makes a purchase.
Satisfied: You’re polite and nice and send a thank-you card.
Enthusiastic: You go the extra mile and send her a real gift in the mail. Maybe a jewelry cleaning kit from the store, which consists of: jewelry cleaner, polishing cloth, instructions for use and a gift certificate to have any one ring checked, tightened and polished.

Yes, you could have given this to her in the store, but everyone loves to receive packages unexpectedly.

If you’re a Pandora dealer, send a plain silver starter bracelet. She’ll have to buy 24 beads or so to fill it up.

Customer Experience 4

Customer says she is a member of a group that meets monthly.
Satisfied: You say, “How nice.”
Enthusiastic: You offer to speak to her group. At the meeting you give a presentation on gems, how they are mined, where they are found, how they are cut and what makes their value. You bring gems from the store to see and give everyone as a souvenir a 7x5mm oval amethyst and your card. Invite them all into the store for a free ring cleaning.

Customer relationship building is about more than a handshake, the exchange of product for money and a big smile. We all talk. I overheard a customer at a jewelry store say, “I love this place, everyone is so nice, and there’s a place for my kids to play Nintendo and my husband to watch TV.”

Ambience, the way the store is laid out, refreshments up front. What can you do to get a customer to say “Wow!” and then a week later tell her friends about her experience?

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This story is from the February 2008 edition of INSTORE.

David Geller is a 14th-generation bench jeweler who produces The Geller Blue Book To Jewelry Repair Pricing. David is the “go-to guy” for setting up QuickBooks for a jewelry store. Reach him at [email protected].

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Celebrate Your Retirement with Wilkerson

For nearly three decades, Suzanne and Tom Arnold ran a successful business at Facets Fine Jewelry in Arlington, Va. But the time came when the Arnolds wanted to do some of the things you put off while you’ve got a business to run. “We decided it was time to retire,” says Suzanne, who claims the couple knew how to open a store, how to run a store but “didn’t know how to close a store.” So, they hired Wilkerson to do it for them. When she called, Suzanne says Wilkerson offered every option for the sale she could have hoped for. Better still, “the sale exceeded our financial goals like crazy,” she says. And customers came, not only to take advantage of the going-out-of-business buys and mark-downs, but to wish a bon voyage to the beloved proprietors of a neighborhood institution. “People were celebrating our retirement, and that was so special,” says says.

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