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Designer Sells Fine Jewelry From a Vending Machine

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Designer Sells Fine Jewelry From a Vending Machine

It’s an ‘unlikely experience.’

Lots of retail experts tout unique events and experiences as the way to appeal to today’s generation of consumers.

Jewelry designer Marla Aaron has apparently that advice to heart. She’s created and installed a “vending machine” at the Brooklyn Museum to carry a selection of her products.

“We created this vending machine as a new way to deliver an unlikely experience for our customers — to find our jewelry in a place where they would not normally find it,” Aaron said in a press release. “Whether that encounter is in exceptional stores (like the ones we are sold in currently), via our e-commerce channels or something unexpected in an unexpected place, like the Brooklyn Museum. This is an experiment on many levels — creatively most especially so it made perfect sense to choose a cultural institution as our partner for this project.”

The vending machine has a touchscreen as well as video capabilities that tell the designer’s story. Aaron is offering seven products for purchase ranging in price from $100 to $1,500.

The machine will be at the museum through the holidays, and the brand plans to roll out additional machines internationally in 2018.

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Designer Sells Fine Jewelry From a Vending Machine

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Celebrate Your Retirement with Wilkerson

For nearly three decades, Suzanne and Tom Arnold ran a successful business at Facets Fine Jewelry in Arlington, Va. But the time came when the Arnolds wanted to do some of the things you put off while you’ve got a business to run. “We decided it was time to retire,” says Suzanne, who claims the couple knew how to open a store, how to run a store but “didn’t know how to close a store.” So, they hired Wilkerson to do it for them. When she called, Suzanne says Wilkerson offered every option for the sale she could have hoped for. Better still, “the sale exceeded our financial goals like crazy,” she says. And customers came, not only to take advantage of the going-out-of-business buys and mark-downs, but to wish a bon voyage to the beloved proprietors of a neighborhood institution. “People were celebrating our retirement, and that was so special,” says says.

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