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Digital Corner: 5 Steps to Take When Your Online Campaign Misses the Mark

Get ready to turn the ship around.

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NO ONE LIKES SEEING low numbers. We all know the feeling of seeing lackluster results. But the difference between the winners and the losers is what you do in response. Get ready to turn this ship around. Here are five steps to take when your online campaign misses the mark.

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To figure out what went wrong, you need to know more. We’re specifically looking for more data to help explain where things went south.

Let’s use the example of a jeweler who ran a Facebook ad campaign to encourage sales of discounted aging inventory and found that there haven’t been many more sales in that area since the campaign started. Here are some additional pieces of information to gather.

  • Facebook engagement
  • Landing page views
  • In-store and phone inquiries
  • Find the Funnel’s Weakness

Each of these areas creates a path that the potential customer can take to buying. Regardless of how simple it is, there is usually some type of marketing funnel that customers go through before purchasing. At some point along this path, too many people are being held up. Unable to get all the way through.

Maybe very few people are interacting with the Facebook ads promoting it. Perhaps the number of views on the landing page is very low. It could be that the people are asking about the collection, but never seem to pull the trigger to buy.

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Think About The Human

Once our jeweler has identified potential weaknesses, it’s important to think through the journey that the customer makes from the first time they encounter the ad on Facebook, all the way to the time that they make the purchase.

Many people forget that digital marketing, like all marketing, is all about people. Don’t be fooled by thinking that there is some technical marketing trick to fix what’s going on here. Our jeweler shouldn’t assume that adjusting the demographic targeting on Facebook will fix things when the actual problem is that the jewelry isn’t very pretty.

Putting biases to the wayside and thinking through the experience of the human being will enable success. When every piece of the campaign from the wording in the ad to the knowledge with the salesperson is properly considered, a well-built campaign will pay big dividends.

Adjust and Try Again

After thinking through the process, our example jeweler finds that a lot of people are clicking over to the website, but they stop there. By traveling through the buying process like a human, it was clear to our jeweler that it’s because there is no gallery of pieces on the landing page. There is a lot of information and a nice graphic about the sale, but the missing piece that the jeweler immediately felt when visiting the page like a customer was the inability to see these specific pieces.

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To fix this, our jeweler decided to add the gallery and give the campaign more time.

It’s important to adjust and try again. It would have been easy for our jeweler to take none of these steps and quit running Facebook ads. But that wouldn’t have been a smart move. In marketing, it’s very important to give campaigns the time and money needed to find out what truly works.

Kill or Scale

Over time, however, a marketing campaign must either perform or be stopped. If, after several attempts at adjusting the campaign, there isn’t progress, it’s time to kill the campaign and try something else. And this will by no means be a failure on the part of the jeweler. This type of trial is simply necessary for jewelry store marketing.

If, however, our example jeweler finds that adding the gallery solves the problem, then it’s time to scale. This is the perfect time to increase the amount being spent on Facebook and see how many more people will be interested in the discounted products.

Use these steps the next time you come across lackluster results in your marketing campaigns and you’ll make success more likely to happen.

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Charles Pobee-Mensah is the director of digital marketing for Fruchtman Marketing. Contact suits@fruchtman.com.

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Commentary: The Business

Raw Gems Hold the Key To Unlocking the Imagination

Learn to sell jewelry as the powerful talisman it always has been.

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WHY DO WE, HUMANS, have such a thing as jewelry?

I don’t think it was intended to mark status originally, back when we were walking around naked and hunting bears and living in caves. I think, on the contrary, it was because of the unforgettable experience of suddenly coming face to face with something amazing, a small thing that shimmered, so unlike anything else in your life, so special, that from that moment on, you knew your life was changed forever.

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You held onto that gem, or pearl, or gold crystal, and knew you had to hold onto it, no matter what. But how? You had no pockets, you wore leaves, or maybe nothing! So you had to figure out some way of drilling it, or wrapping it, and, inevitably, hung it about your neck. In every culture, the first jewelry is always a pendant, one thing protected. When you have something around your neck, you are going to fondle it, and soon you become very attached to it; maybe it will protect you and become your secret power. And that, which I call Transcendence, is why we have such a thing as jewelry!

So when your customer moans, “My daughter does not even like jewelry!” smile and resolve to bring back the magic. In a corner of my gallery, there is a partially enclosed space called the Gem Room with drawers of tourmalines, amethysts and colored sapphires and such, and I enjoy inviting people in to discuss custom work.

But when I see a young adult coming in, quick, before they whip out their electronics, I challenge them: “You look like someone who would like raw gems! Let me show you something unusual!” and I whisk them away to the Gem Room (while the parent goes about their business). I place in their hand a large raw lapis, full of pyrite stars, a piece of opal rough with a shimmering stripe in one corner, or a huge slice of watermelon tourmaline. A transformation! They are now alive.

Then you say “Wouldn’t this be right for Game Of Thrones (or a warrior in Wakanda)?” Then tell them where it came from, how hard it is to find and ask them, yes, to imagine themselves as a prehistoric human walking out of a cave, suddenly finding something amazing like this: wouldn’t they want to somehow keep it? But they have no pockets, they’d have to find a way to drill it, wrap it, maybe, and that is how jewelry comes into being. Then you walk away and let them play for a while.

You know that now they get it.

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Columns

How to Handle Negative Online Reviews

Taking a day or two to cool off is the first step.

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THERE’S A LOT TO be said for taking the initiative to run a business; do the best job you can do, keep employees happy, keep clients happy, perform good work, be honest, all while trying to turn a profit. Inevitably, no matter how kind, humble, honest, and hard-working you are, someone is going to spoil the soup. Everyone has an opinion, everyone is an expert, and now the clients who don’t get their way or aren’t completely satisfied have a plethora of ways to tell the world and troll your business.

It stinks. For all the expletives I have muttered to myself when a less-than-shining online review happens, I will keep it relatively “clean” for this article by saying it stinks like a fresh turd on a hot sidewalk in the middle of a muggy summer. It ruins your day by upsetting your stomach and putting you in a downright foul mood.

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That feeling is not the one you should be harnessing when you write your reply. Like it or not, anyone under the age of 50 looks at reviews when seeking new businesses to work with. More particularly, they scan past the shining reviews to find the dirty laundry to see how badly things can go wrong when they do. Like a bad wreck on the highway — show me the carnage!

When it comes to reviews, I am not of the “roll over and take it apologetically” crew, nor am I of the “give ‘em hell” team. Let a negative review simmer for a day or two while you come down from the adrenaline of seeing red (“How dare they?!?!”) and don’t post a reply until you’ve had extra eyes on what you are saying. Ask an employee, friend, or colleague to look at your reply from the outside.

Remember that a review comes from that person’s point of view. There are many sides to a story. In extreme situations of riots, attacks, and politics, different media outlets will show different perspectives (often skewed). Bad reviews may seem skewed, but for the individual, it is their truth. They felt compelled to say something because the situation made them feel something.

Never post a canned response on a bad review. Readers see generic responses as an uninvolved robot behind the scenes just placating the reviewer. It feels like a cover-up.

Never post a defensive rant! Factual key points are all you need to speak your piece. It’s better if you apologize and accept that you and your team aren’t perfect; we’re all human.

Finally, accept that some people are trolls and you cannot make them happy. It’s OK in those circumstances to call them out. I have publicly responded to an unreasonable review (backed up with facts), noting that the request for a free repair on an item we didn’t sell was irrational, and telling the world the reviewer is not welcome to return to my studio. That particular response has brought in several new clients who got a good laugh and subsequently left positive reviews when they met our team. They love that we are as real in-person as we are online.

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Shane Decker

Here’s the Most Important Area To Invest In As a Store Owner

You’re only as good as your people.

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RETAIL STORE OWNERS ARE having a difficult time holding onto their people. Right now, about half of all sales teams change every three years, and every seven years there is a total team change (with the exception of one or two “loyalists” in each store).

What’s the solution? Training. When salespeople have more knowledge, they close more sales and make more money. And as long as they’re making money, they’re far less likely to leave you.

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Training involves several areas, but one of the most fundamental is product knowledge. Your customers are more educated than ever before — and millennials are taking this to a whole new level. They do more research and know more about the product they’re purchasing than most salespeople do.

That’s why all salespeople, especially in bridal and diamonds, should take GIA Diamonds 1 and 2 and Diamond Grading. To some of you, this seems elementary, but I see so many salespeople who haven’t done this.

Salespeople who don’t have product knowledge talk too much to make up for their lack of knowledge. When you talk too much, you can talk right past the closing opportunity. Talking too much also takes the client’s attention away from the item being sold, and it takes attention away from the reason he or she came into your store in the first place.

Product knowledge gives you self-confidence and empowers you. When you have self-confidence, the client will have confidence in you. They won’t have as many objections. Your closing ratio will go up because clients can tell that you know what you’re talking about. They will trust you to help them make a decision.

Owners and managers: hold a one-hour sales meeting each week. Spend 20 minutes on product knowledge, 20 minutes on salesmanship, and 20 minutes on role-playing. When your sales team is well-trained, you’ll have more time to work on your business and you’ll be interrupted less often to help people close sales.

You’re only as good as the people you train. Your team controls how much money you make. And it’s amazing how many salespeople in jewelry stores do not know what they’re doing.

When salespeople are empowered with knowledge, they’re happier and more successful. Teamwork is better because they trust each other’s sales skills.

If you want a higher inventory turn, a higher closing ratio, and more net profit, start training your team. The more knowledgeable they are, the more valuable they feel and the longer they will stay. You invest money in buildings and marketing — start investing in your most valuable asset: your people.

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