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Don’t Buy My Product!

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Don’t Buy My Product!

I was just reading about one of the more arresting corporate initiatives of the past year — the “Common Thread Initiative” from outdoor/adventure apparel company Patagonia.

Common Thread” was a campaign to encourage Patagonia’s customers to re-consider their consumption habits. What was most unusual about it was that Patagonia most strongly encouraging its customers to reduce its consumption of the company’s own products. (Not to mention providing them with the tools to do so.) 

The campaign resulted in this buzzed-about advertisement in The New York Times right at the start of the holiday season.

Note the careful itemization of the jacket’s environmental cost — enough water to supply 45 people for a day, 20 pounds of carbon dioxide, etc. While there’s a few dollops of product puffery — the jacket advertised is said to be “sewn to high standard” and “exceptionally durable, so you won’t have to to replace it as often” — the message is clear and sincere. You may not need what we make. Before you buy, be sure you do.

It is a brave and beautiful thing to lead a business that supports your most deeply-held values. Even better when those values are felt strongly and rewarded by your customers.

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Anyway, this should be food for thought for anyone in our (very highly resource-intensive) industry.

Don’t Buy My Product!


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Celebrate Your Retirement with Wilkerson

For nearly three decades, Suzanne and Tom Arnold ran a successful business at Facets Fine Jewelry in Arlington, Va. But the time came when the Arnolds wanted to do some of the things you put off while you’ve got a business to run. “We decided it was time to retire,” says Suzanne, who claims the couple knew how to open a store, how to run a store but “didn’t know how to close a store.” So, they hired Wilkerson to do it for them. When she called, Suzanne says Wilkerson offered every option for the sale she could have hoped for. Better still, “the sale exceeded our financial goals like crazy,” she says. And customers came, not only to take advantage of the going-out-of-business buys and mark-downs, but to wish a bon voyage to the beloved proprietors of a neighborhood institution. “People were celebrating our retirement, and that was so special,” says says.

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David Squires

Don’t Buy My Product!

Published

on

Don’t Buy My Product!

I was just reading about one of the more arresting corporate initiatives of the past year — the “Common Thread Initiative” from outdoor/adventure apparel company Patagonia.

Common Thread” was a campaign to encourage Patagonia’s customers to re-consider their consumption habits. What was most unusual about it was that Patagonia most strongly encouraging its customers to reduce its consumption of the company’s own products. (Not to mention providing them with the tools to do so.) 

The campaign resulted in this buzzed-about advertisement in The New York Times right at the start of the holiday season.

Note the careful itemization of the jacket’s environmental cost — enough water to supply 45 people for a day, 20 pounds of carbon dioxide, etc. While there’s a few dollops of product puffery — the jacket advertised is said to be “sewn to high standard” and “exceptionally durable, so you won’t have to to replace it as often” — the message is clear and sincere. You may not need what we make. Before you buy, be sure you do.

Advertisement

It is a brave and beautiful thing to lead a business that supports your most deeply-held values. Even better when those values are felt strongly and rewarded by your customers.

Anyway, this should be food for thought for anyone in our (very highly resource-intensive) industry.

Don’t Buy My Product!


{JFBCLike}

{JFBCComments}

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Celebrate Your Retirement with Wilkerson

For nearly three decades, Suzanne and Tom Arnold ran a successful business at Facets Fine Jewelry in Arlington, Va. But the time came when the Arnolds wanted to do some of the things you put off while you’ve got a business to run. “We decided it was time to retire,” says Suzanne, who claims the couple knew how to open a store, how to run a store but “didn’t know how to close a store.” So, they hired Wilkerson to do it for them. When she called, Suzanne says Wilkerson offered every option for the sale she could have hoped for. Better still, “the sale exceeded our financial goals like crazy,” she says. And customers came, not only to take advantage of the going-out-of-business buys and mark-downs, but to wish a bon voyage to the beloved proprietors of a neighborhood institution. “People were celebrating our retirement, and that was so special,” says says.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular