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Editor’s Note: Choose a Path

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Is it better to demand to be paid for every minute, or should you bet on a fuzzy future return?

BY DAVID SQUIRES

This article originally appeared in the February 2015 edition of INSTORE.

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What kind of retailer are you? It’s a question you should ask yourself every few years.

You read one set of business books that advocate going the extra mile for your customers — with titles like Wow Your Customers!, Raving Fans and Knock Your Socks Off Service. (How far can they go with this aggressive titling? Will we someday see a business book with the title Create Frothing-at-the-Mouth, Offering-To-Bear-Your-Children Customers … For All Eternity!) Then you come across a different set of business books with titles like It’s Time to Make Money, Up Against the Wal-Marts, and Profit First. These emphasize doing your job well, but making sure you get paid for Every Second of your time.

So what do you do? Whose star do you follow? That answer can only come from you. But our advice is: Whatever you decide to do, do it all-out, with total commitment. If you emphasize service and nurturing long-term “raving customers,” then do the small stuff with a gigantic smile on your face and keep your hands in your pockets when the job is done. You’re betting customers will be so impressed, they will return again and again. And if you do your job well enough, they will. On the other hand, if you emphasize making money for your labor, then make sure you really get paid. Don’t charge $3.99 for a watch battery replacement because that’s what Walmart charges. You won’t make money, and you’re not gonna impress customers either.

Make a choice. Then go all-out. It’s the right path to follow.

Wishing you the very best business,

one quick question for jewelers

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Wilkerson Testimonials | MSG Jewelers

Wilkerson Takes the Worry Out of Closing

MSG Jewelers has always treated its customers like family. When owner Mike George decided to retire and close the doors of his St. Louis, Missouri jewelry store, he selected a company to manage his going-out-of-business sale that treats its customers like family, too. That’s why he chose Wilkerson. “Wilkerson was able to do all the things that we needed,” says George. In the end, the bittersweet store closing was so much easier with Wilkerson at the helm. From marketing to pricing to inventory, Wilkerson does it all. “It’s a package deal,” says George.

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David Squires

Editor’s Note: Choose a Path

Published

on

Is it better to demand to be paid for every minute, or should you bet on a fuzzy future return?

BY DAVID SQUIRES

Advertisement

This article originally appeared in the February 2015 edition of INSTORE.


What kind of retailer are you? It’s a question you should ask yourself every few years.

You read one set of business books that advocate going the extra mile for your customers — with titles like Wow Your Customers!, Raving Fans and Knock Your Socks Off Service. (How far can they go with this aggressive titling? Will we someday see a business book with the title Create Frothing-at-the-Mouth, Offering-To-Bear-Your-Children Customers … For All Eternity!) Then you come across a different set of business books with titles like It’s Time to Make Money, Up Against the Wal-Marts, and Profit First. These emphasize doing your job well, but making sure you get paid for Every Second of your time.

So what do you do? Whose star do you follow? That answer can only come from you. But our advice is: Whatever you decide to do, do it all-out, with total commitment. If you emphasize service and nurturing long-term “raving customers,” then do the small stuff with a gigantic smile on your face and keep your hands in your pockets when the job is done. You’re betting customers will be so impressed, they will return again and again. And if you do your job well enough, they will. On the other hand, if you emphasize making money for your labor, then make sure you really get paid. Don’t charge $3.99 for a watch battery replacement because that’s what Walmart charges. You won’t make money, and you’re not gonna impress customers either.

Make a choice. Then go all-out. It’s the right path to follow.

Wishing you the very best business,

Advertisement

one quick question for jewelers

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | MSG Jewelers

Wilkerson Takes the Worry Out of Closing

MSG Jewelers has always treated its customers like family. When owner Mike George decided to retire and close the doors of his St. Louis, Missouri jewelry store, he selected a company to manage his going-out-of-business sale that treats its customers like family, too. That’s why he chose Wilkerson. “Wilkerson was able to do all the things that we needed,” says George. In the end, the bittersweet store closing was so much easier with Wilkerson at the helm. From marketing to pricing to inventory, Wilkerson does it all. “It’s a package deal,” says George.

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Most Popular