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Embrace Weakness

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It’s your shortcomings that make you real.

 

 

There comes a time in life when it makes more sense to embrace your weaknesses than to hide or correct them. (I’m thinking it happens about the time you turn 40.) You are a certain type of person. And your store is a certain type of store. Ask yourself now — does your store let you be you? If not, it might be time to make some changes — perhaps to your store, or perhaps just to your role within it.  
 
You might be a person who loves to tell stupid jokes. Certainly a weakness. Instead, turn it into a strength by making a series of commercials where you tell awful knock-knock jokes. Then tell an even dumber one to each person who enters your store. (Before turning them over to a more typical salesperson.) 
 
You might be a person who tends to be way too technical when explaining gemstones to customers. Weakness, right? Instead, make it a strength by promoting yourself as your town’s “ultimate gemstone nerd” and building a by-appointment business for customers who want to know everything about the purchase they are considering. 
 
You might be a person who loves hideous fashion jewelry from the ’70s. Most people not named Florence Henderson would consider that a weakness. Flip it by creating a little museum of the era in a corner of your store — fill it with Partridge Family lunchboxes, print dresses in Day-Glo colors, corduroy bell-bottoms, and your jewelry collection. 
 
It’s all about authenticity. Embrace your weaknesses. For it is your weaknesses that make you real.  
 
 
Wishing you the very best business … 
DAVID SQUIRES 
[email protected]
 

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Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

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David Squires

Embrace Weakness

Published

on

It’s your shortcomings that make you real.

 

 

There comes a time in life when it makes more sense to embrace your weaknesses than to hide or correct them. (I’m thinking it happens about the time you turn 40.) You are a certain type of person. And your store is a certain type of store. Ask yourself now — does your store let you be you? If not, it might be time to make some changes — perhaps to your store, or perhaps just to your role within it.  
 
You might be a person who loves to tell stupid jokes. Certainly a weakness. Instead, turn it into a strength by making a series of commercials where you tell awful knock-knock jokes. Then tell an even dumber one to each person who enters your store. (Before turning them over to a more typical salesperson.) 
 
You might be a person who tends to be way too technical when explaining gemstones to customers. Weakness, right? Instead, make it a strength by promoting yourself as your town’s “ultimate gemstone nerd” and building a by-appointment business for customers who want to know everything about the purchase they are considering. 
 
You might be a person who loves hideous fashion jewelry from the ’70s. Most people not named Florence Henderson would consider that a weakness. Flip it by creating a little museum of the era in a corner of your store — fill it with Partridge Family lunchboxes, print dresses in Day-Glo colors, corduroy bell-bottoms, and your jewelry collection. 
 
It’s all about authenticity. Embrace your weaknesses. For it is your weaknesses that make you real.  
 
 
Wishing you the very best business … 
DAVID SQUIRES 
[email protected]
 

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

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Most Popular