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Envision Your Ideal Dinner Party When Planning Your Store Mood and Displays

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LAFAYETTE, LA — If you were throwing a dinner party, what kind of dinner party would it be?

Who would you invite?

What would you serve?

What would your centerpiece look like?

What kind of mood would you like to create?

Fun, light and summery? Or rich and romantic?INSTORE Eileen Stuller

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The Stuller team recently spoke on “Visual Merchandising and Your Brand Experience.”

Jennifer Tausch, Stuller’s executive director for brand and creative, and Emily Graffagnino, Stuller’s director of packaging and display, recommend trying this conceptual exercise to begin to envision your brand as well as the look of your store.

The Stuller team spoke on “Visual Merchandising and Your Brand Experience” during a Bench Jeweler Workshop at Stuller March 23-25.

Pull photos from Pinterest and assemble a photo board of your own, showing what your ideal dinner party would look like. Then translate the look and feel of it to what you’d like your store to be like. Will there be fresh flowers? Music? What kind of scent best represents your brand?Is there a theme?

If you’re looking to attract a subset of environmentally conscious millennials, try an eco-chic safari theme, for example. Bring in something green, such as bamboo or succulents, add rustic wood, use some open cases. Make it natural, open, inviting and fresh.

If your main audience is baby boomers with disposable income, you might consider something more classic. For a Renaissance, red-carpet theme, use cherry wood, red roses, and shades of wine with gold accents. Emphasize integrity and quality.

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If you want to appeal to Gen X self-purchasing women, emphasize modern aesthetics, and perhaps a black and white motif with pops of color. Think about white roses and marble risers and non-traditional ways to display necklaces. Having a black and white theme makes it easy to bring in a gold accent for the holidays or to add a little sparkle for New Year’s.

In other words, figure out how you fit into the marketplace before changing your display strategy.

Branding and display are closely linked.

“Ask yourself, why are customers choosing you versus others?” suggests Tausch. “And who is your customer?

“Your brand is the sum of emotions and thoughts your audience has about your company.”

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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Envision Your Ideal Dinner Party When Planning Your Store Mood and Displays

mm

Published

on

LAFAYETTE, LA — If you were throwing a dinner party, what kind of dinner party would it be?

Who would you invite?

What would you serve?

What would your centerpiece look like?

What kind of mood would you like to create?

Advertisement

Fun, light and summery? Or rich and romantic?INSTORE Eileen Stuller

The Stuller team recently spoke on “Visual Merchandising and Your Brand Experience.”

Jennifer Tausch, Stuller’s executive director for brand and creative, and Emily Graffagnino, Stuller’s director of packaging and display, recommend trying this conceptual exercise to begin to envision your brand as well as the look of your store.

The Stuller team spoke on “Visual Merchandising and Your Brand Experience” during a Bench Jeweler Workshop at Stuller March 23-25.

Pull photos from Pinterest and assemble a photo board of your own, showing what your ideal dinner party would look like. Then translate the look and feel of it to what you’d like your store to be like. Will there be fresh flowers? Music? What kind of scent best represents your brand?Is there a theme?

If you’re looking to attract a subset of environmentally conscious millennials, try an eco-chic safari theme, for example. Bring in something green, such as bamboo or succulents, add rustic wood, use some open cases. Make it natural, open, inviting and fresh.

Advertisement

If your main audience is baby boomers with disposable income, you might consider something more classic. For a Renaissance, red-carpet theme, use cherry wood, red roses, and shades of wine with gold accents. Emphasize integrity and quality.

If you want to appeal to Gen X self-purchasing women, emphasize modern aesthetics, and perhaps a black and white motif with pops of color. Think about white roses and marble risers and non-traditional ways to display necklaces. Having a black and white theme makes it easy to bring in a gold accent for the holidays or to add a little sparkle for New Year’s.

In other words, figure out how you fit into the marketplace before changing your display strategy.

Branding and display are closely linked.

“Ask yourself, why are customers choosing you versus others?” suggests Tausch. “And who is your customer?

“Your brand is the sum of emotions and thoughts your audience has about your company.”

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular