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Five Things I Know For Sure: Kelly Williams

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Kelly Williams

K.W. Goldsmith, Minneapolis, MN

This article originally appeared in the April 2015 edition of INSTORE.

When Kelly Williams graduated college with a degree in fine art in 1995 and a jewelry apprenticeship, she became hooked on metalwork almost immediately, moving on to work as a designer goldsmith and to study at top trade schools. In 2010, she became sole proprietor of K.W. Goldsmith, a full-service custom trade shop. In that role, she’s also the goldsmith for half a dozen retail stores. In 2012 she launched her own line of cowgirl jewelry, Whiplash Designs. — Eileen McClelland

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1
Inspiration will strike whenever I least expect it, so I always have a sketchbook handy. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gotten up in the middle of the night to sketch an idea I just had.

2 Take care of your tools and they will take care of you. Any time you invest in tools, it’s always a good investment. If it makes your job more efficient and saves you from frustration, it’s always a great purchase.

3 Coffee makes everything better.


4 A goldsmith must pay attention to detail. Not only when you’re creating a piece — to make sure everything fits together and is functional — but also, attention to what the client wants. Sometimes you have to read between the lines to understand what they are trying to communicate. They come to you with a vague idea; they have something pictured and you have something pictured and you have to get the two pictures to match up, to figure out a design that will be functional and durable and still what they are visualizing.

5 Nothing goes 100 percent according to plan. Always have a backup plan, a plan B and a plan C.

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Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

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Five Things I Know For Sure: Kelly Williams

Published

on

Kelly Williams

K.W. Goldsmith, Minneapolis, MN

This article originally appeared in the April 2015 edition of INSTORE.

Advertisement

When Kelly Williams graduated college with a degree in fine art in 1995 and a jewelry apprenticeship, she became hooked on metalwork almost immediately, moving on to work as a designer goldsmith and to study at top trade schools. In 2010, she became sole proprietor of K.W. Goldsmith, a full-service custom trade shop. In that role, she’s also the goldsmith for half a dozen retail stores. In 2012 she launched her own line of cowgirl jewelry, Whiplash Designs. — Eileen McClelland

1
Inspiration will strike whenever I least expect it, so I always have a sketchbook handy. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gotten up in the middle of the night to sketch an idea I just had.

2 Take care of your tools and they will take care of you. Any time you invest in tools, it’s always a good investment. If it makes your job more efficient and saves you from frustration, it’s always a great purchase.

3 Coffee makes everything better.


4 A goldsmith must pay attention to detail. Not only when you’re creating a piece — to make sure everything fits together and is functional — but also, attention to what the client wants. Sometimes you have to read between the lines to understand what they are trying to communicate. They come to you with a vague idea; they have something pictured and you have something pictured and you have to get the two pictures to match up, to figure out a design that will be functional and durable and still what they are visualizing.

5 Nothing goes 100 percent according to plan. Always have a backup plan, a plan B and a plan C.

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular