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GIA Announces Colorful Lineup for Tucson 2017 Gem Shows

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Exhibits, seminars and other events are planned.

(Press Release) CARLSBAD, CA – GIA has announced activities and services to enrich the visitor experience at the 2017 Tucson shows.

The plans include an alumni event, show service laboratory, exhibits, expert talks and more. The institute will have a presence at the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA) GemFair, Jan. 31-Feb. 5, and the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show (TGMS), Feb. 9-12, both taking place at the Tucson Convention Center. More information is available on the GIA website.

GIA highlights at the 2017 Tucson shows include:

Party at the GIA Gem Mine: Cosmic Blast

The GIA Alumni Association’s “Cosmic Blast” auction, dinner and dance party will take place Friday, Feb. 3, from 6:30 to 11 p.m. at the Marriott University Park Hotel. Ticket prices are $55 prior to Jan. 15; $65 after and at the door. GIA alumni, students and industry friends can buy tickets here

Museum and Library Exhibits

Synthetic Diamonds at AGTA. Synthetic diamonds grown by the HPHT and CVD methods have become more prevalent in the jewelry trade. The institute – which can identify all known types of synthetic diamonds – will display a variety of samples including large colorless and colored rough HPHT, large colorless and colored faceted HPHT, rough CVD, faceted CVD, rough HPHT melee, and faceted HPHT melee diamonds side-by-side with natural diamonds at its booth on the Galleria level.

The Fersman Catalog at TGMS. The GIA library’s copy of Russia’s Treasure of Diamonds and Precious Stones by A.E. Fersman is one of the few surviving examples of a Bolshevik-era catalog of royal jewels seized during the Russian Revolution. The library will feature a special display at TGMS dedicated to the catalog, including a historical figure of Catherine the Great by George Stuart (on loan from the Ventura County Museum of Art) and replicas of notable diamonds the Orlov and the Shah.

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Highlights of the Hauser Collection at TGMS. GIA’s museum recently acquired a collection of ornamental minerals of exceptional size and quality, made possible through a donation by the family of Joel and Barbara Hauser. Many of the pieces are from localities with restricted access or that are no longer producing. Attendees of TGMS will have the opportunity to view 13 of the finest pieces from the Hauser collection as part of a special exhibit.

GIA Show Service Laboratory at AGTA

GemFair Show attendees and exhibitors will have convenient access to gem identification and country-of-origin services through the GIA Show Service Laboratory. GIA will accept gemstones onsite at the AGTA GemFair in the Onyx Suite Monday through Saturday (Jan. 30 to Feb. 4) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 5, from 9 a.m. to noon. Click here for details on how to submit a stone for GIA’s Show Service Laboratory.

Free GIA Seminars

Rediscovering the Chivor Emerald Mine – In the Footsteps of Peter W. Rainier. On Wednesday, Feb. 1, from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Mojave Room, GIA’s Manager of Photography and Visual Communications Robert Weldon will tell an epic tale of triumph over adversity about Peter W. Rainier, a South African who ran Colombia’s Chivor emerald mine in the 1920s.

The Latest News from GIA Research. On Friday, Feb. 3, from 9 to 10 a.m. in the Mojave Room, GIA’s Distinguished Research Fellow Dr. James Shigley will provide an update on the institute’s latest research on diamonds, colored stones and other timely topics of interest.

Russia’s Treasure of Diamonds and Precious Stones. On Friday, Feb. 10, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Crystal Ballroom, GIA Librarian Rose Tozer will discuss the significance of this rare 1925 catalog of Romanov jewels, as well as the GIA library’s extensive digitization project of its rarest and most historically important works.

GIA Education

GIA will offer one fee-based lab class and two fee-based lecture/labs in the Greenlee Room during AGTA. Pre-registration is required; call GIA admissions at +1 800 421 7250 ext. 4001 or +1 760 603 4001 to sign up.

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GEM 240L Gem Identification Lab Class, Monday through Friday (Jan. 30 to Feb. 3) 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Students practice the same time-tested procedures and identification skills used by the institute’s renowned gemological experts in this lab class. Students use gemological instruments to practice identifying natural gemstones, imitations, assembled stones and synthetics. Along with hands-on training, GIA instructors demonstrate key tests and coach students in quick, effective testing procedures.

Identifying Inclusions in Corundum and EmeraldSaturday, Feb. 4, 9 to 11 a.m. In this seminar, students explore the interiors of specially chosen rubies, sapphires and emeralds. Through lecture and hands-on practice, students get an up-close look at gems from new sources, learn to recognize specific types of inclusions, and understand how they help laboratory gemologists determine geologic origin, possible country of origin and potential treatments.

Identifying Synthetic and Imitation Colored Stones, Saturday, Feb. 4, 1 to 3 p.m. This new GIA seminar is designed to sharpen gem identification skills. Through a lecture and hands-on practice with a microscope and a selection of unusual synthetics and challenging new imitations, students learn key identifying features to help detect these materials and gain valuable experience.

 

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Brooklyn Jewelers Launches Newest Line

It’s called “Neighborhoods Collection”.

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(PRESS RELEASE) BROOKLYN, NY – Brooklyn Jewelers announces the official launch of its newest line, the new “Neighborhoods Collection”. Taking inspiration from the art and fashion trends of Brooklyn, this collection is designed with millennials in mind. All of our jewelry is available in castings with select styles offered finished (in white, yellow, rose, 14K, 18K, palladium, and platinum).

For more information, contact: info@brooklynjewelers.com or call (718) 534-4408

Activate your account today to view.

Check out our website: brooklynjewelers.com

We are also on Facebook and Instagram: @brooklynjewelers

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David Sexton of Jewelers Mutual Group Retires

He retires after 39 years with Jewelers Mutual.

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David Sexton

(PRESS RELEASE) NEENAH, WI – Earlier this week, Jewelers Mutual Group announced the retirement of longtime vice president of Loss Prevention and Consulting, David Sexton, CPCU.

Sexton began his association with Jewelers Mutual in 1980 as an Underwriting Assistant and enhanced his career through roles in commercial lines customer service, CL underwriting, and specialty account management, becoming vice president of Loss Prevention and Consulting in 2004.

In this critical loss prevention leadership role, Sexton was responsible for the development, recommendation and implementation of Jewelers Mutual’s loss prevention policy. He is credited with building key relationships between Jewelers Mutual with the jewelry, alarm, and law enforcement communities, to effectively promote comprehensive loss prevention strategies to reduce jewelry exposures to loss.

“It was never about me, it was always about us,” Sexton said.

Sexton will officially retire from Jewelers Mutual on December 31, 2019, however he plans to remain involved with the company for the foreseeable future through engagement with Jewelers Mutual associates, jewelry associations at industry events, and collaborations with agents/brokers. He will continue to work with the Jewelers Mutual executive team to ensure key relationships and partnerships he has helped forge remain strong.

“I will always treasure the relationships I have made during my association with Jewelers Mutual,” Sexton said. “My retirement is not an end, but rather a beginning. The leadership of Jewelers Mutual has a clear path for continuing our vital loss prevention mission to provide innovative risk management solutions for the industry we serve, not just insurance.”

Sexton, a member of the 24 Karat Club of New York, currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Jewelers’ Security Alliance, a nonprofit association devoted to reducing crimes against the jewelry industry, as well as the Canadian Jewellers Association. In 2016, Sexton was the recipient of the Jewelers’ Security Alliance Industry Service Award and in 2018 he received the American Gem Society’s John J. Kennedy Law Enforcement Award.

Sexton has served on the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Security Systems Council, formerly known as the Burglary Protection Council, since 1994 and also serves as a corporate member of UL in the insurance category. He served on the Central Station Alarm Association’s Insurance Liaison Committee, which assisted in the development of the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) burglar alarm modular certificate program and remains active on several UL/ULC Standard Technical Panels through which UL/ULC develops and maintain their standards for safety.

“You’re known by the company you keep,” Sexton said. “It’s all about the people. Working with people to help them solve their risk management challenges has really been the most rewarding aspect of my insurance career.”

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CIBJO Releases Ethics Special Report, Examines International Frameworks and Proper Disclosure

International conventions increasing with which members of the jewelry industry are expected to comply.

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(PRESS RELEASE) MILAN, ITALY — With fewer than five weeks to go to the opening of the 2019 CIBJO Congress in Manama, Bahrain, on November 18, 2019, the sixth of the CIBJO commissions’ Special Reports has been released. Prepared by the CIBJO Ethics Commission, headed by Tiffany Stevens, it covers a variety of topics, including the increasing number of international conventions with which members of the jewelry industry are expected to comply, and recommended processes of disclosure.

“Responsible business standards being applied in the jewelry industry are meshing further and further with those used internationally, and with frameworks that govern other industries around the globe. It is important that jewelry industry companies fully understand their responsibilities under these complex sets of expectations, and they communicate them effectively and directly with their supply-chain partners and ultimately the consumer,” Ms. Steven writes.

“A few key systems to keep in mind include the OECD frameworks, with special attention to the organization’s Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict Affected and High-Risk Areas, the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the FTC Jewelry Guides in the United States, ISO standards, the World Diamond Council System of Warranties, and the perhaps-evolving definition of “conflict” under the Kimberly Process,” she continues.

Government scrutiny of the jewelry supply chain’s adherence to ethical business practices is becoming increasingly common, the CIBJO Ethics Commission President notes, citing a recent meeting of jewelry industry leaders with officials of the U.S. State Department, where the industry was counseled to abide with standards for managing risks to women in the minerals, responsible sourcing and jewelry supply chain, as well as complying with Anti-Money Laundering and other measures to prevent malign activity.

Noting that it is the consumers’ right to know how the how their jewelry and its components affected the environment and the lives of people as it journeyed along the supply chain, she states that being forthright, fully descriptive and making all disclosures clear and easy to understand is imperative.

“When seen globally, we have at our disposal an amazingly complex system of frameworks, definitions and semantics,” Ms. Stevens writes. “But as a trade we should aim for the simplest, most direct forms possible when communicating with consumers, and these should be standard in the sales representative’s in-store pitch to a potential customer, on invoices, on social media and online – wherever products are bought and sold.”

To download a full copy of the CIBJO Ethics Commission’s special report, click here.

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