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GIA Gets Specific on Laboratory-Grown Diamonds

New LGDR by GIA reports with 4Cs color and clarity specifications.

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(PRESS RELEASE) CARLSBAD, CA — As consumer interest in laboratory-grown diamonds increases, GIA (Gemological Institute of America) is driving its consumer-protection mission forward by introducing LGDR by GIA, a family of four new digital-only reports for laboratory-grown diamonds with 4Cs color and clarity specifications replacing the descriptive terms and grade ranges previously used on GIA reports for laboratory-grown diamonds.

“The evolution of GIA’s reports for laboratory-grown diamonds is fully aligned with our mission to protect all consumers,” said Susan Jacques, GIA president and CEO. “Everyone who purchases gemstone jewelry – whether natural or laboratory-grown – expects and deserves the information, confidence and protection that come with a GIA report.”

Available since Oct. 13, the four LGDR by GIA reports feature a distinct new look and updated format fully differentiated from GIA’s well-known grading reports for natural diamonds.

  • The GIA Laboratory-Grown Diamond Report includes 4Cs color and clarity specifications, and plotted clarity and proportions diagrams for D-to-Z laboratory-grown diamonds 0.15 cts and above.
  • The GIA Laboratory-Grown Diamond Report – Dossier includes the 4Cs color and clarity specifications and a proportions diagram for D-to-Z laboratory-grown diamonds 0.15 cts to 1.99 cts.
  • The GIA Laboratory-Grown Colored Diamond Report includes the GIA color and clarity specifications, and plotted clarity and proportions diagrams for colored laboratory-grown diamonds 0.15 cts and above.
  • The GIA Laboratory-Grown Colored Diamond Report – Color Identification includes color specifications for laboratory-grown colored diamonds.

The color and clarity specifications for laboratory-grown diamonds are described on the same scale as GIA grading reports for natural diamonds, but that does not correlate to nature’s continuum of rarity.

Fees for the new reports are the same as for natural diamonds, with the addition of inscription services fees when applicable. Full fee schedules are available at GIA.edu/gem-lab-fee-schedule.

GIA is committed to continuing to inform consumers and retailers about the differences between natural and laboratory-grown diamonds to ensure that consumers clearly understand the product that they are purchasing. Each LGDR report features a QR code linked to a custom landing page on GIA’s website, GIA.edu/LGDR, offering comprehensive, engaging and dynamic information on laboratory-grown diamonds – what they are, how they are grown and how GIA definitively identifies them.

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The new LGDR reports state that the stone was created by either the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) method and whether it may include post-growth treatments to change the color.

All laboratory-grown diamonds submitted to GIA will be laser-inscribed with the GIA report number and the words “LABORATORY-GROWN” to ensure that consumers can clearly differentiate them from natural diamonds. Any stone submitted that is already inscribed with laboratory-grown, laboratory-created, man-made, synthetic or [manufacturer name]-created will only receive the report number inscription.

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