Connect with us

Here’s How Many Hours Jewelers Work Per Week

mm

Published

on

Jewelers are a hard-working group.

Running a business is hard work — but is your workload any heavier or lighter than that of other jewelers?

As we collect responses for this year’s Big Survey, we’re bringing you a few highlights from years past. We call them Big Survey Flashbacks.

Today we bring you a question from our 2012 survey: “How many hours do you work a week?”

The most popular answer, making up 45 percent of responses, was 50 hours. In second place, representing 28 percent of respondents, was 60 hours.

Twenty-two percent of respondents said they worked 40 hours a week, while 5 percent said they worked 30 hours and 1 percent said they worked 20 hours.

Here are some related questions that we asked:

Advertisement

Describe your workload.

Overworked — 46 percent.

Underworked — 6 percent.

Just right — 48 percent.

Do you feel fairly paid for your work?

Yes — 50 percent.

Advertisement

No — 28 percent.

No, but I don’t care — 22 percent.

If you’re away from the store, how long can you comfortably go without checking in?

Four hours — 11 percent.

1 day — 24 percent.

2-3 days — 32 percent.

Advertisement

1 week — 20 percent.

2 weeks — 8 percent.

Want to have your say on the industry and what it means to own or manage an American jewelry store in 2017? Click HERE to take the latest INSTORE Big Survey. (The survey will probably take about 20 minutes to complete and is designed to be taken solely by store owners and managers.)

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular

Fun

Here’s How Many Hours Jewelers Work Per Week

mm

Published

on

Jewelers are a hard-working group.

Running a business is hard work — but is your workload any heavier or lighter than that of other jewelers?

As we collect responses for this year’s Big Survey, we’re bringing you a few highlights from years past. We call them Big Survey Flashbacks.

Today we bring you a question from our 2012 survey: “How many hours do you work a week?”

The most popular answer, making up 45 percent of responses, was 50 hours. In second place, representing 28 percent of respondents, was 60 hours.

Twenty-two percent of respondents said they worked 40 hours a week, while 5 percent said they worked 30 hours and 1 percent said they worked 20 hours.

Advertisement

Here are some related questions that we asked:

Describe your workload.

Overworked — 46 percent.

Underworked — 6 percent.

Just right — 48 percent.

Do you feel fairly paid for your work?

Advertisement

Yes — 50 percent.

No — 28 percent.

No, but I don’t care — 22 percent.

If you’re away from the store, how long can you comfortably go without checking in?

Four hours — 11 percent.

1 day — 24 percent.

Advertisement

2-3 days — 32 percent.

1 week — 20 percent.

2 weeks — 8 percent.

Want to have your say on the industry and what it means to own or manage an American jewelry store in 2017? Click HERE to take the latest INSTORE Big Survey. (The survey will probably take about 20 minutes to complete and is designed to be taken solely by store owners and managers.)

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular