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Retailers reveal unforgettable encounters with Christmas shoppers

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Any random day in the life of a jeweler provides plenty of stories to tell – whether those tales are heartwarming, infuriating, funny or odd. But once the holidays are on the horizon, those stories become more and more, shall we say, interesting. Here is a compilation of some of our favorites, culled from reports from the front lines of fine-jewelry retail. Go forth bravely this season, and bring your sense of humor!

THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS

1 During the 2016 holiday season, we were down two employees (one on maternity leave, one on medical leave). It was chaos and those of us who were working don’t remember much about it … except for meltdown lady. A client came in the week before Christmas to have us refurbish a chemically damaged ring (cracked and missing metal). We told her because of our schedule we couldn’t guarantee a Christmas delivery, and she yelled at me that she thought we were professionals. I said we would try, but again reiterated there were no guarantees. She came in two days later to pick it up (Christmas was still five days away) and we told her we hadn’t even had a chance to look at it yet. She crossed her arms, stomped her feet, and proceeded to have a toddler-style meltdown in the middle of our packed showroom. My lead jeweler volunteered to stay late to do the work if she would just pay and leave. I offered to ship it to her so I wouldn’t have to see her again. Of course, the day after Christmas she was in with the daughter because the ring was four sizes too small (we were only repairing the breaks). It was clearly our fault the ring was the wrong size and she demanded we size it up for free while she waited. I promptly told her our only guarantee was on the ring repair and not on the size — and she could pay for the sizing, pay the rush fee if she wanted it while she waited, or find the door. She left the ring, we sized it, and when she came to pick it up, she got in a few jabs about how we should have known it needed to be sized (we had never met her daughter). I told her after her behavior in our studio three times that she was no longer welcome to return. It was my first client “firing” and it felt good!!! jennifer farnes, revolution jewelry works, colorado springs, co

SOMETHING BORROWED

2 We had a customer who wanted to purchase three or four high-end rings, let his wife wear them through New Year’s and then let her keep one and bring back the others. I told him we would not take back anything that was worn. He said fine, he would shop elsewhere. I thanked him. rosanne kroen, rosanne’s diamonds & gold, south bend, in

CHARMED, I’M SURE

3 We had a client tell us they needed eight ugly-sweater charms for Christmas, and it was the 21st of December. All custom made. It was an unusual request since we never saw an ugly-sweater charm before and only had three days to make up the charms. The client offered to pay more than the usual asking price because of the short notice. We made the charms, the customer came back in and was ecstatic. He ended up sending us a gift card to our local Brazilian steakhouse and a picture of everyone wearing their ugly sweater with their matching ugly-sweater charm. lyla ismael, lyla jewelers, oak lawn, il

THAT TAKES THE CAKE

4 A customer in her 80s is downsizing and found a gold-plated cake knife in our box, in mint condition, engraved with her in-laws’ names and 50th anniversary date. She wants to return it! cathy graves, ellis jewelers, frankfort, in

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WRAPPER’S DELIGHT

5 One Christmas season, I was wrapping an item that a female customer had just purchased. She said, “Wow, I can’t believe you still wrap!” I replied, “Yes, we will always offer to wrap for you, no problem.” She returned later that afternoon with the presents she had purchased at the mall the same day for us to also wrap! nancy carbonetti, stephen’s jewelers, wilmington, de

THE MOONSHOT

6 The Christmas hot seller a few years back was the Bulova Accutron watch. A man comes in looking for the “Astronaut.” I show it to him, but he just can’t pull the trigger and leaves. Next day he comes in, looks again but can’t decide. I introduce him to the assistant manager. He leaves to think about it. The man comes in several more times and finally says he will be back on Christmas Eve to purchase the watch. Fast forward to Christmas Eve, and we are closed and pulling the merchandise for the night, nearly ready to have a toast and call it a season. The man comes to the entrance and rattles the door, trying desperately to get in. The manager says, “Who the #!*# is that?” I tell him the man has come back to purchase the Accutron Astronaut. Manager lets him in and after trying it on he says … “I’ll be back after Christmas!” don delano, jl jewelers, tampa, fl

THE TICKING CLOCK

7 I was working with a customer last Christmas on an engagement ring. He wanted it for New Year’s Eve, but because we close the week after Christmas, it had to be completed Christmas Eve. It was Dec. 21 and he needed to decide on which diamond he wanted. He was running late and I told him I did not mind staying late. We closed at 7 and he arrived at 7:30. He kept going back and forth between diamonds for four hours. Finally, at 11:45, I told him he had 15 minutes to make up his mind because I was going home at midnight. Plus, I still had to make a custom setting for the ring! I will go the extra mile for a customer, but he almost went too far. It was a $24,000 sale, so I guess it was worth it. rick sanders, sanders jewelers, gainesville, fl

CELEBRITY APPEARANCE

8

We kept the store open after closing on Christmas Eve for a huge, internationally known celebrity thinking he was going to make a very large purchase. After the long season, everyone was looking forward to getting to their families and a little R&R, but we stayed (the whole crew) more than an hour in hopes that this guy was going to make it all worthwhile. In the end, he purchased a $64 pair of pearl studs. Well, at least we can say he shops with us at Christmas. Maybe next time!!? jon walp, long jewelers, virginia beach, va

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PREGNANT WITH ANTICIPATION

9

09 When I lived and had my workshop on a small farm, there was a loud knock on the front door on a wild and windy night. I open the door to find a bedraggled elderly lady holding a very fat Chihuahua. She said that her dog was about to give birth and she immediately thought of me as I had a few sheep and was used to working with small things. gordon laurie, eidos, santa fe, nm

TIME FLIES

10
One fellow came in late afternoon on Christmas Eve with a complicated custom ring design. I priced it out, he agreed, then he said, “I can pick this up tomorrow, right?” When I regained my composure to answer, no, it would take us two weeks to make, he responded, “But it’s all she wants for Christmas! She gave me the design in October!” russell criswell, vulcan’s forge, kansas city, mo

THE CONNOISSEUR

11I once had a customer whom I would consider a Mr. Know It All. He was shopping for an engagement ring, and after showing him multiple diamonds, I decided to have a little fun and test his knowledge of diamonds. I showed him a larger cubic zirconia, and after examining the stone, he gave me his thoughts and pointed out what he liked and didn’t like about the stone. I then told him it was in fact a cubic zirconia. We had a good laugh and I gained his trust. He is actually now one of my best customers and a good friend. james stinson, diamond classics, mcminnville, tn

THE MARATHON LOSER

12 It’s Christmas 2011. A young man comes into the store looking at jewelry. He asks to see an $1,800 gold chain. The sales associate shows him and he decides to run out the front door with the chain without paying for it. The sales associate screams, “He has our chain!” Dress shoes and all, I go running after the bandit. Little does he know that I have been training for the past two years for a major ski trip and an upcoming 10K race. Our mailman sees what is going on as I am screaming at the chain bandit and begins to run with me. The UPS guy sees what’s going on and parks his truck in the middle of the road and helps us. After a few hundred yards or so, two young men on their bikes see what’s happening, ride in front of the chain burglar, drop their bikes and tackle the idiot. Cops show up and the rest is history. We get the chain back, he goes to jail and no one is hurt. Just another day in retail! greg raskin, raskin’s jewelers, prescott, az

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RIGHT OUT OF MY MOUTH

13 One Christmas season, I snuck out of the shop just to run down a few doors for a soda. When I left, my associate was helping a college student pick out a gift. In the meantime, an older gentleman came in to find something, too. (Yes, I know that I left her alone while already tied up with one client … argh… I should be embarrassed, but whatever!) Anyway, the old guy that came in was upset he had to wait, yelled at her and started walking out the door. The college kid says to him as sweetly as possible, “Merry Christmas, ya A$$hole!” Sometimes those things that would feel so good to say in retail actually get said (thankfully, by someone else)! erika godfrey, hawthorne jewelry, kearney, ne

HIS FINAL MISTAKE

14 A customer bought his wife a Christmas gift and then bought one for his girlfriend as well. After he mixed up the packages, his wife came in, stating that he must have switched the package and given his girlfriend her gift because she would never wear the present he gave her. She ended up exchanging the gift for another piece on a slight up-charge of about $12,000. I don’t know if these people are still married, but instincts would tell me no. marc majors, sam l. majors, midland, tx

TURNS OUT, SANTA JUST ISN’T FUNNY

15 One Christmas Eve, a gentleman came in the front door dressed as Santa Claus. Within seconds of entering the store, he announced, “This is a stick up.” We had already called 911 before we realized that it was our local hardware store owner who had been enjoying too much holiday cheer wanting to spread a little of his cheer and trying to making a joke. No one else found his joke amusing. james sickinger, sickinger’s jewelry, lowell, in

CHRISTMAS EVE ON ICE

16 The goofiest Christmas customer request I got came a few years ago when cellphones were the size of large lunch boxes. This customer called me from the center of Mille Lacs Lake while ice fishing at about 4 p.m. and said he forgot that this was Christmas Eve and would I wait for him to get to town in about an hour and a half. Needless to say, I agreed and showed no mercy when he came in. I sold him the second-highest priced item in the store (I couldn’t quite get him to buy the highest priced item). I always felt that this was fair because he published most of the phone directories in Minnesota and we all know how pushy they used to be. ed menk, e.l. menk jewelers, brainerd, mn

DECIMALS MATTER

17 We had a customer come in at the last minute on Christmas Eve wanting to look at the prettiest pair of diamond earrings we had in the store. My staff showed him a gorgeous pair of earrings with a cost of $4,295. The customer was thrilled, had us wrap them up and proceeded to write us a check for $42.95! andrew russakoff, russakoff jewelers, skowhegen, me

GOD KNOWS HE TRIED

18 I had a gentleman buy a ring and then marry himself to God in front of one of our mirrors. He came back the following week requesting a refund of the ring. Oh my. jill keith, enchanted jewelry, danielson, ct

A TALE OF TWO RINGS

19 Our favorite story from any holiday happened probably 25 years ago. Dad and I were discussing the sales of a busy December day. After a crazy discussion, we realized he and I had sold an engagement ring to two different guys within an hour apart. Each was asking the same girl to marry them. The girl was the daughter of one of my dad’s friends. She had been dating one of the young men for six years, the other for six months. She told them both no. She is still a customer, and married to a different guy. hugh harby, harby jewelers, jacksonville, fl

DESIGNATED DRIVER

20 An extremely nervous groom-to-be “celebrated” his purchase with so many celebratory shots that I had to drive him home! I made a customer for life! dennis petimezas, watchmakers diamonds & jewelry, johnstown, pa

LIGHTS, CAMERAS, ACTION!

21 We had a customer who wanted to create an amazing Christmas experience for his wife here in our store. He purchased an amazing piece of jewelry then gave us directions on the special day. We have a large showroom with a staircase at the south end that leads to offices and the staff break room. He explained he wanted Santa at the top of the stairs with a bell. On his cue, Santa was to appear on the stairs ringing his Christmas bell and carrying the wrapped gift. He took his wife to lunch and let us know they would be in around 1:30. We rented a Santa costume and our jeweler became Santa. Two female associates stood at the bottom of the stairs to give Santa the cue to come down. Our customer was to let us know when Santa was to make his entrance. At the last minute he decided he wanted the girls at the bottom of the stairs to sing Jingle Bells. They were a bit panicked but agreed. The customer gave the word, the singing began and Santa came down the stairs ringing his bell. The customer’s wife was surprised and delighted. The store was very busy with Christmas shoppers. We still have customers that remind of us this amazing memory. georgena kincaid, gold casters fine jewelry, bloomington, in

JUST LOOKING FOR TROUBLE

22 At 4:55 p.m. on Christmas Eve, a gentleman strode in and did a power look. My friend D walked up to him at the counter with a freshly applied smile. He said, “I’m just looking.” To my surprise, D said: “No you’re not. You’re in deep trouble. Now what can I help you with?” He walked out with a box! steven wardle, forest beach design, chatham, ma

AT LAST, SOMETHING SWEET

23 I was waiting on a family. The grandma really loved a pair of earrings, but they just didn’t have the $99 to buy them. We continued talking, and a few minutes later, one of our sales associates came over. She had a wrapped Christmas gift for the grandma. She unwrapped the gift and it was the earrings she wanted! Seems another client decided to be our “Christmas Angel!” She created a joyous time that touched all of us. debbie fox, fox fine jewelry, ventura, ca

Eileen McClelland is the Managing Editor of INSTORE. She believes that every jewelry store has the power of cool within them.

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Gene the Jeweler

Gene the Jeweler Gets Kicked Out of the Studio

In the latest episode (#42) of Gene the Jeweler, Gene is going about his business, recording a new episode. But that doesn’t last long. Four-time NFL Pro Bowl leading rusher Ahman Green walks in, and Gene finds that his time in the studio is over — whether he likes it or not. (See more Gene the Jeweler episodes at instoremag.com/gene.)

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Cover Stories

THE INSTORE DESIGN AWARDS 2019 – Winners Announced!

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Jewelry design is the lifeblood of our industry, and those on its forefront are constantly challenging the status quo, pushing boundaries in creativity and wowing jewelry lovers with their skill and passion. These are the creators we seek to honor with the INSTORE Design Awards.

For 2019, we expanded our categories from eight to 25, allowing designers more freedom to enter the best category for each piece. And we received more than 171 entries as a result. In order to determine the best of the best, we recruited a judges panel composed of nine retailers, all of whose businesses carry multiple designer lines, to vote on their favorite jewelry in a “blind voting” process. We also opened voting to all North American jewelry retailers online at instoremag.com, where more than 9,300 votes were cast to decide the “Retailer’s Choice” winner in each category.

And finally, as we have since our competition began, we recognize one up-and-coming designer who embodies the inventive spirit so long encouraged by our former colleague Cindy Edelstein, who passed away in 2016.

Now, turn the page and see the very best that our industry has to offer. Who knows, maybe you’ll find your next hot-selling line right here in this story!

Best Men’s Jewelry

Best Statement Piece

THE JUDGES

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Cover Stories

3 Simple Ways a “Good-Better-Best” Display Can Make You More Money

The success of these pricing strategies has been proven beyond dispute.

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The success of thoughtfully implemented “Good-Better-Best” (G-B-B) pricing strategies has been proven beyond dispute. Look around. Airlines offer coach class seats with variable options. Allstate offers auto batteries with warranties ranging from 12-48 months at prices that vary disproportionately. Heating oil suppliers sell plans based on a monthly fluctuating rate as well as a “premium” package in which the rate is fixed for the season.

I read a recent article in the Harvard Business Review (“The Good-Better-Best Approach to Pricing,” by Rafi Mohammed) that made me wonder why retail jewelers were not taking full advantage of this strategy in their stores.

Twenty years ago, Allstate conducted research to determine just how much price really mattered to their insurance customers. They learned that drivers are very concerned that if they are involved in an auto accident, their rates will go up. They introduced three new policy levels to add to their “Standard” level policy. They have a “Basic” policy at 5 percent below “Standard,” a “Gold” policy (6 percent higher price), and a “Platinum” level policy (15 percent higher price). Last year, only 10 percent of their customers downgraded to “Basic,” while a whopping 23 percent upgraded from “Standard” to “Gold” or “Platinum.”

So what can we do in a retail jewelry store to take advantage of this tendency of consumers to move up in price when given attractive options?

Implementing a “Good-Better-Best” plan in your store has three benefits. One, it can entice new and existing customers to spend more. Two, it allows you to compete directly with lower-priced competitors, including Internet shops. And three, a G-B-B strategy will change your customers’ actions through consumer psychology.

Successfully offering a G-B-B option depends on the following considerations:

  1. The price level of the “Good” option should be no more than 25 percent below the price of the “Better” option. The “Best” option should be no more than 50 percent higher than the “Better” option. For example, if we have a $1,000 “Better” item, the “Good” option should be about $800, and the “Best” option about $1,400.
  2. There should be a perceived important difference between the “Good” and “Better” options that motivate the customer to opt up for the “Better” selection. Limit the number of features in your “Good” option to improve the perceived value of the “Better” option.
  3. Each option should be explained in four attributes that differentiate it from the lower-priced option.
  4. Signage should clearly explain the differences and costs of each option. Name each option intelligently. Don’t use descriptions that confuse the merchandise. There is nothing wrong with simply using “Good, Better, Best.”

When you are determining the price points for your G-B-B offerings, consult your “inventory performance by category” report in your inventory management software. This will tell you the average selling price of your current sales for each different category and style of merchandise. Your goal is obviously to sell more at higher prices, so consider a price about 10 percent higher than your current average sale as your “Better” option. For example, if your average diamond stud earring sale is $1,000 now, make your price points $899, $1,099 and $1,399.

Retail jewelers should benefit from the thoughtful implementation of the G-B-B principles. Here are some display suggestions for your store.

Diamond stud earrings and anniversary bands

Offer three grades of earrings in the most popular styles. The differences in stud earring prices are obviously predicated by diamond size and quality as well as mounting material.
Start with 14K white gold mountings with round diamonds in sizes ranging from one-eighth, one-quarter, one-third, one-half, three-quarters and one-carat sizes. Develop a source (internally or externally) that can provide three different qualities in all six sizes. Obtain a display arrangement that allows the three qualities and sizes to be shown with descriptions, as well as prices and monthly payment options. Add signage that explains each of the four differentiating points between the qualities offered. Put in place a reorder procedure that quickly refills the empty space when sales occur.

Bridal

Make your most popular styles of engagement rings (halos, solitaires, sets, three-stone, etc.) and create a display with a G-B-B variation of each in a single tray. If you can, include several of these in each showcase. If you can direct your customer to those trays, you stand a better chance of easily up-selling the customer to a bigger size. Feature payment amounts to make it easier for your staff to sell up.

I am a big believer in organizing your bridal showcase by style, not by vendor brand (unless it is a very recognizable national brand) or diamond size. That is how your customer shops. With all your halo choices collected together in a single part of the showcase, you’ll find it much easier to move up in price and keep your customer from having to visit several showcases in order to see your selection.

Other merchandise

Follow this same strategy. Choose your most popular designs and identify what you can do to that item to be able to sell it at 25 percent less. Maybe it is a smaller stone or a metal change to silver. Make that new item your “Good” selection. Now revisit the original piece and ask what you can add to the design to make it worth 25 percent more. Make that your “Best” choice, and display them all together with prices and payments.

If you are successful with such a strategy, it could make both your customer and you very happy. Your store would be easier for your customer to shop, and your inventory could shrink to fewer pieces offered since your sales are more concentrated in your G-B-B offerings.

Give it a try and see what happens to your average sale. If it works, expand it. If it doesn’t, try something else. Be sure you track the results of your efforts to know what has worked and what has not.

Retail jewelry is hard enough without leaving money on the table when the customer is already in your store and poised to buy. Implementing this strategy might just move your results from “Good” to “Better” to “Best.”

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E-Commerce for Everyone: Let Your Customers Buy Something Where & When They Want To

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E-commerce has been vilified by many independent retail jewelers as an under-cutting, price-conscious evil entity intent on stealing hard-earned business from brick-and-mortar stores while ripping their profit margins to shreds.

At this point, though, it’s more or less a matter of if you can’t beat them the way you’ve been operating, you’d better consider joining them.

It’s time to rethink e-commerce as a viable option for you, the independent brick-and-mortar-based jeweler, but also to understand what it takes in dollars and time to drive traffic to a website, says Ben Smithee, digital-marketing expert and CEO of The Smithee Group. The big online players didn’t get where they are without investing considerable time and money into marketing, social media and search-engine optimization.

In other words, simply enabling e-commerce is not like flipping a switch and watching the money pour in. Instead, imagine you’re opening a second store. How much planning and preparation would you put into that? You’d work with a store designer. You’d hire more staff. You’d invest in advertising.

“Most people grossly underestimate what it takes for advertising to send people to the site,” Smithee says. “A lot of them expect to have overnight sales. Start with realistic expectations — they should be thinking about selling one, two, three things a week or a month to start and ramping up from there. Without realistic expectations, they will decide it doesn’t work and will quit,” Smithee says.

Independent jewelers like Tim Wright of Simply Unique Jewelry Designs in Yorktown, VA, have been reluctant converts in recent years. Wright says he realized in the past year that his company has to be searchable and sell its wares online. If not, he says, “We will go away like other independents in our area.”

It took time for Wright to wrap his head around the idea. “I cannot imagine people ordering jewelry, especially our one-of-a-kind pieces, off the Internet, but we are working on a new website to be more searchable and to be able to sell off of it. The basics we all have survived on over the years are not selling in the store anymore because of the Internet.”

Shane O’Neill, vice-president of Fruchtman Marketing, advises independent jewelers to temper their expectations when they turn to e-commerce.

Most jewelers are not going to see significant amounts of e-commerce, he says, because the marketing perspective is much different between traditional stores and online stores. “If they are marketing around a 20-mile radius, we still know that people want to touch and feel the jewelry,” says O’Neill. Plus the data that millennials don’t shop in stores isn’t necessarily true. They shop in bigger numbers than Gen X or baby boomers do. But they shop online with the idea of browsing and checking out pricing, and so they expect a shopping experience with all of the details revealed, O’Neill says.

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The preparation it takes to be ready for e-commerce almost certainly will result in increased sales in the store.

“They probably have checked all the boxes in terms of a good user experience, descriptions, photos, categories of metal type and have galleries of multiple products,” O’Neill says. “When someone comes to the website and they have the ability to have a great browsing experience, they make purchasing decisions based on that. When they stop in the store, you should have a higher closing rate. To me, that’s an e-commerce transaction, too.”

The website should be like your second store, O’Neill says, in terms of how you relate to the customer online: “How you flow people through your site is like what a sales associate does in the store.”

For Janne Etz of Contemporary Concepts in Cocoa, FL, e-commerce has grown steadily over the past two years from 35 percent of her business to a solid 50 percent. “You have to pay serious attention to it,” she says. “It is not a set-it-and-forget-it operation. What works with e-commerce this month will evolve into something else next month. It’s a constant learning process. I continue to study and learn and implement the newest techniques, so I can continue to grow!”

Stephenie Bjorkman of Sami Fine Jewelry in Fountain Hills, AZ, says an e-commerce-enabled website seems like a huge project, and it can be. But start somewhere, she says. “Just do it, or just do something,” she says. “Get ready to flip that switch. Take on little bits and pieces at a time and set goals. I am so far from anywhere near where I want to be, but my marketing department and I sat down and made a monthly calendar so that we could plan all of our marketing, social media, blogs etc.” Bjorkman’s team also worked on posting pieces for sale in groups of 24 at a time.

If even this seems like too much, start with making time for your own social media. Friend your top 100 clients and start from there.

“I think you need to make a plan, then work your plan,” Bjorkman says. “You can begin by doing this in the evening when you get home. Or have one of your employees spend an hour a day on it. The first step is that every day you should be posting on social media. Post real pictures and start creating your online image. Connect your posts to your website and tell them how to buy.”


Borsheims

E-Commerce Continues to Evolve in an Omni-Channel World

Borsheims of Omaha, NE, has been selling online since 1998 and today has seven associates dedicated to e-commerce.

“We’ve seen tremendous growth in the channel,” says Adrienne Fay, director of marketing and business sales — a 40 percent increase year over year in online sales for the past two years. This year that trend continued with a huge lift in January and February. The e-commerce staff is involved in navigation, digital photography, answering questions and virtually holding hands as needed. They also fulfill the orders — 99.9 percent of the inventory is in the store already.

In March 2018, the company introduced a new website that made online purchases easier on all devices, while updating their ring-builder tool to make it both more user-friendly and more luxurious-looking, says Andrew Brabec, director of e-commerce. “A lot of our customers will utilize their mobile device first and then make a purchase on their desktop. They prefer the process on the mobile device; it’s easier, faster.” Chat is used more than ever by customers looking for a promo code or to ask a quick question, but few purchases take much hand-holding.
One reason for that is that the new website is designed to anticipate questions that shoppers might have. Photographing jewelry items next to coins, for example, allows customers to gauge the size of the piece quickly and easily. “The main questions we get are: What size is this? And how does it look on someone?” Brabec says. One goal is to provide more views of each product.

“We try to replicate our customer service online,” says Fay. “It’s a strategic investment. We look at shoppers in an omni-channel fashion. Not as an e-commerce customer, not as a store customer. Simply a customer. We want to be able to knock their socks off in all channels.”

Shoppers who convert to online sales represent a wide demographic — established customers, gift shoppers, fine jewelry shoppers. Average order fluctuates, but recently it was $263. “We definitely have sold items that retail in the tens of thousands. Not every day, but it’s not unusual,” Fay says. Customers log in from all over the U.S. and the world; international checkout is available with exact pricing.

What’s next? Borsheims is testing out products to provide shoppers with 360-degree views of products, a technology that is increasingly common in other industries. Another huge goal is to get 97 percent of their products visible online; currently that number is about 74 percent. “We want to see more items in the cart, too, so we’re working on ways to up-sell in the cart by showing related products,” Brabec says. “In addition, we are going to evaluate pages to make them faster and more effective.”

The year 2020 represents Borsheims 150th anniversary. “And you don’t survive that long if you don’t evolve and grow and roll with the punches,” Fay says. “We used to say we at Borsheims are going to tell you as customers what you need to buy. Now we respond to what they are looking for with content and expertise and education.”


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Ringcrush

Growing Fast on Etsy

Bailey Lehrer founded Ringcrush, a start-up online jewelry store, selling $30 to $60 jewelry items on Etsy. She started the business with $700 and turned a profit immediately.
“We were able to grow in two years really quickly,” Lehrer says. “I did a little under $1 million on Etsy and another $300,000 on Amazon. It made sense for me to start up online. Etsy is really friendly to people who want to experiment.”

Lehrer says that while high-end diamond solitaires aren’t the norm on Etsy, moissanite rings are moving fast, as are other non-traditional types of diamond engagement rings, usually with an artisan design or a unique setting. “Etsy is primarily for 25- to 35-year-old women,” she says. “A lot of them still want that look and they can swap out the stone later. One of the most popular rings looks like a hand-carved band with a diamond solitaire in the center.”

Bailey Lehrer, founder of Ringcrush

The process of opening a shop on Etsy is easy, Lehrer says, because they hold your hand through the whole process. Still, there’s more to it than just opening. “You have to understand your competition and price point. It can be cutthroat with common items, and there are people from other countries selling items with razor-thin margins. You need something unique. That way you can raise your price.”

Her point of differentiation is pieces of raw gemstones. “So I still focus on precious stones like emerald and sapphire, but I’m able to sell them at $60 because I get them uncut. They’re still blue if it’s a sapphire; still green if it’s emerald. It’s kind of a unique aesthetic, so it’s easy to stand out.”

Another thing to keep in mind, Lehrer says, is that there is clear evidence shoppers will convert to making a purchase if the product is photographed on a white background. “Know how to take great pictures,” she says.


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Mullen Bros.

They Want to Be Your Local Jeweler, No Matter Where You Are

Bob Mullen is owner and founder of Digital Jewelers Academy, as well as an owner of the family business, Mullen Bros. Jewelers in Swansea, MA.

For several years, Mullen and his family pondered the “what ifs” and the concerns they imagined would come with e-commerce while they experimented with product catalogs on their website. “What about stock? What about if we sell things that are sold out? What about fraud? But it’s like having children: If you wait till you’re ready, you’re never going to do it.” In 2014, they began selling online through Shopify and realized $100,000 in revenue the first year.

“In terms of problems, the same things that I thought in my mind would be problems DID happen, but it was not that big of a deal to overcome them. In terms of inventory, it was about keeping things on the site that would be accessible and in stock, unless it’s something like bridal. We only work with designers who have products available that we can get quickly.
“Like anything else, there is no one thing that made it happen. It’s like Jim Collins wrote in the book Good To Great. You build momentum, and it gets easier and easier. It’s the trial and error of learning our audience, learning what they respond to, and looking at Google Analytics.”

Now Mullen, a marketing major in college, is working with other retailers on e-commerce goals. Digital Jewelers Academy, in partnership with Gemsone, administers a private Facebook group with instructional videos and an online posting service. “It’s about e-commerce, creating engaging content, Facebook ads, email strategy, website conversion.”

How much time does e-commerce take? “If you’re budgeting 10 to 15 hours a week of someone’s time, you can make a lot of progress if you know what you’re doing. You can be much more efficient in three hours knowing what you’re doing than 10 hours wandering around.”

Bob Mullen, owner and founder of Digital Jewelers Academy

“The No. 1 question I’m asked is regarding differences in inventory and pricing between the website and physical store. A lot of jewelers feel like they should treat the website like a separate store with lower prices to attract business. But unless you’re trying to build a nine-figure company, you should target a customer most like your own.

Mullen’s average ticket online is around $600, which is higher than in his store. “Our biggest sale was $17,000 and it goes down to $99 here and there. The sweet spot, like anything in jewelry sales, is $200 or $300. But the idea that people are just going online and plunking down 10 grand is a myth.”

The key to success is to provide the same level of service you do in your store. “In my opinion, I can service people a lot better than whoever is manning the call center at Blue Nile,” says Mullen. “You can sell an engagement ring in 10 minutes or have multiple visits over four hours in the store; online, it might take three to six emails. It’s about being proactive and being prompt about responding when people email.”

Local limits mean little when it comes to e-commerce, Mullen contends. “People respond nationally to the same things people respond to locally. Our industry loses 1,000 stores a year. When their jeweler closes, people have to go online or find another local store. More and more people are going online as a result, and are happy to work with a local jeweler, wherever you are. Meet them where they are.”


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SAMI’S FINE JEWELRY

“We Are Definitely on Our Way to Our Goal”

Last year, Stephenie Bjorkman of Sami’s Fine Jewelry decided that her website and online sales needed to be a priority. But she also knew it was tough, if not impossible, to find time to own the store, work with vendors, manage employees, pay bills, oversee marketing and launch e-commerce.
So she hired one person and then a second person to make it happen.

Stephenie Bjorkman of Sami’s Fine Jewelry

“The only way I could do this was to have a dedicated person to take pics, write descriptions, update events, blogs, social media and more. What is really scary is that I see such an importance in this job, I have already hired her an assistant.”

It hasn’t necessarily “worked” just yet, says Bjorkman. But it is working. “Since I hired devoted staff members, I have seen a 30 percent increase in online sales, along with tons of daily mentions in the store. All of this proves that in the end, having a marketing person is well worth it.”

Online, Bjorkman sells branded items, including her own Animal Rockz line, a custom sterling-silver line of jewelry available in 38 different pet breed varieties. “My store is full of animal lovers, so this is easy for us to be passionate about. We seem to sell at least one of these a day. Prices range from $35-$60 plus shipping. The magic numbers seem to be in the $250-$500 average range. But, with that said, I sold a $30,000 diamond off my website and a $25,000 estate diamond from my e-blast.”

Sales are considered and tracked as “online sales” if everything is done online.

“If you do sell it 100 percent online, you need to handle them like any other client. Answer quickly, make them feel special. We do chat by phone, by social media messengers, text them, and even send them videos. It is a lot of work, but the good news is that it works.

“Our e-commerce actual sales do not currently represent a large amount of my overall business. A two-year goal for me is to sell as much as having a second store. E-commerce also represents the best type of marketing you can do for your business. Long before you advertise in a newspaper, magazine, etc., you should take time to do your online marketing, social media, e-blasts and blogs.”

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