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How to Win at Social Media

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How to Win at Social Media

Facebook is becoming just as “noisy” as radio, television or print. Every business and their dog has a page and wants to tell you about their product. Posting en masse does not mean you have a successful Facebook strategy. In fact, you could be turning people off.

It’s true, I’ve often touted Facebook as an affordable, cutting-edge and “speak to them where they live” way to reach customers (both past and future). The problem is, businesses that are used to advertising as a one-way medium (you speaking to them) are bringing that methodology to Facebook, and it’s failing miserably, probably even worse than they know.

One guy who does it right is Daniel Gordon of Samuel Gordon Fine Jewelers in Oklahoma City. (Yes, we’ve covered Dan extensively. Why? Because he does so many things right!) Here’s what I love about Dan’s Facebook posts (not to mention Twitter and other online media):

  1. He’s not overtly selling anything. 
  2. He doesn’t usually post about jewelry. So when he does, it’s novel and interesting, rather than overdone. 
  3. He asks questions! Dan is fabulous at starting conversations among his followers by asking simple yes or no questions. He’s tapped into the very reason that so many people spend so much time on Facebook: to share their opinions and hear the opinions of others. 
  4. He asks his Facebook friends for help. Last Thursday, he was asking if anyone could help him source a silver kazoo for a customer. 
  5. He shares personal details. That puts a personality to his store’s brand that customers enjoy.

Here’s what Dan has to say about his Facebook strategy:

“My online priority has always been to connect with people. These days, a majority of what we see online is self promotion. I’ve always believed in putting others first in an online forum and the fact I’m a very curious person has helped me realize that making someone else the star of the show is a great way to interact, whether it’s on or offline. Whether it be asking people about a favorite band, a good local restaurant to recommend, or an opinion on what is proper etiquette in an online forum, it all led me to a better understanding of the community I had developed over a long period of time.

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Asking someone’s opinion is a compliment. It shows you value what another has to say and are listening. A thirst for knowledge plus a passion for people has made for some very enlightening, interesting and lengthy online conversations that have never disappointed . With all the noise of people telling us what important message they think we want to hear that they have to say, asking someone else what they think is a refreshing and enjoyable experience for both sides.”

Oh, and by the way, while the Samuel Gordon Fine Jewelers page is definitely more “business-like” in its posts, Dan’s personality still comes through. The posts are fun and engaging. No matter how good you think you are at Facebook, if you haven’t checked out Dan’s page (http://www.facebook.com/ DanGordon) and the SGFJ page (http://www.facebook.com/SamuelGordons), I highly recommend it.

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Want More “Me” Time? Wilkerson Will Get You There!

It was time. Teri Allen and her brother, Nick Pavlich, Jr., had been at the helm of Dearborn Jewelers of Plymouth in Plymouth, Mich., for decades. Their father, Nick Pavlich, Sr., had founded the store in 1950, but after so many wonderful years helping families around Michigan celebrate their most important moments, it was time to get some “moments” of their own. Teri says Wilkerson was the logical choice to run their retirement sale. “They’re the only company that specializes in closing jewelry stores,” she says. During the sale, Teri says a highlight was seeing so many generations of customers who wanted to buy “that one last piece of jewelry from us.” Would she recommend Wilkerson? Absolutely. “There is no way that I would have been able to do this by myself.”

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How to Win at Social Media

Published

on

How to Win at Social Media

Facebook is becoming just as “noisy” as radio, television or print. Every business and their dog has a page and wants to tell you about their product. Posting en masse does not mean you have a successful Facebook strategy. In fact, you could be turning people off.

It’s true, I’ve often touted Facebook as an affordable, cutting-edge and “speak to them where they live” way to reach customers (both past and future). The problem is, businesses that are used to advertising as a one-way medium (you speaking to them) are bringing that methodology to Facebook, and it’s failing miserably, probably even worse than they know.

One guy who does it right is Daniel Gordon of Samuel Gordon Fine Jewelers in Oklahoma City. (Yes, we’ve covered Dan extensively. Why? Because he does so many things right!) Here’s what I love about Dan’s Facebook posts (not to mention Twitter and other online media):

  1. He’s not overtly selling anything. 
  2. He doesn’t usually post about jewelry. So when he does, it’s novel and interesting, rather than overdone. 
  3. He asks questions! Dan is fabulous at starting conversations among his followers by asking simple yes or no questions. He’s tapped into the very reason that so many people spend so much time on Facebook: to share their opinions and hear the opinions of others. 
  4. He asks his Facebook friends for help. Last Thursday, he was asking if anyone could help him source a silver kazoo for a customer. 
  5. He shares personal details. That puts a personality to his store’s brand that customers enjoy.

Here’s what Dan has to say about his Facebook strategy:

Advertisement

“My online priority has always been to connect with people. These days, a majority of what we see online is self promotion. I’ve always believed in putting others first in an online forum and the fact I’m a very curious person has helped me realize that making someone else the star of the show is a great way to interact, whether it’s on or offline. Whether it be asking people about a favorite band, a good local restaurant to recommend, or an opinion on what is proper etiquette in an online forum, it all led me to a better understanding of the community I had developed over a long period of time.

Asking someone’s opinion is a compliment. It shows you value what another has to say and are listening. A thirst for knowledge plus a passion for people has made for some very enlightening, interesting and lengthy online conversations that have never disappointed . With all the noise of people telling us what important message they think we want to hear that they have to say, asking someone else what they think is a refreshing and enjoyable experience for both sides.”

Oh, and by the way, while the Samuel Gordon Fine Jewelers page is definitely more “business-like” in its posts, Dan’s personality still comes through. The posts are fun and engaging. No matter how good you think you are at Facebook, if you haven’t checked out Dan’s page (http://www.facebook.com/ DanGordon) and the SGFJ page (http://www.facebook.com/SamuelGordons), I highly recommend it.

{JFBCLike}

{JFBCComments}

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Want More “Me” Time? Wilkerson Will Get You There!

It was time. Teri Allen and her brother, Nick Pavlich, Jr., had been at the helm of Dearborn Jewelers of Plymouth in Plymouth, Mich., for decades. Their father, Nick Pavlich, Sr., had founded the store in 1950, but after so many wonderful years helping families around Michigan celebrate their most important moments, it was time to get some “moments” of their own. Teri says Wilkerson was the logical choice to run their retirement sale. “They’re the only company that specializes in closing jewelry stores,” she says. During the sale, Teri says a highlight was seeing so many generations of customers who wanted to buy “that one last piece of jewelry from us.” Would she recommend Wilkerson? Absolutely. “There is no way that I would have been able to do this by myself.”

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