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Ignoring the benefit of social media

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Yesterday’s post was my rant on the basic human need to feel loved 🙂 and many retailers are avoiding that need by not making it standard policy to greet each and every customer. I know, you say it’s policy and that by now, everyone knows this and encourages the basic hello…but trust me, it’s not. Try mystery shopping and see what happens.

Social media, while it feels different because of the perceived distance between people communicating with one another…isn’t. When I see a tweet for example, that you’ve posted and I reply to you…I’m trying to strike up a conversation with you.

 A few weeks ago, I tweeted a congratulations to a store for their recognition as a cool store. They ignored me! No reply. Nothing. My need for feeling loved was not met. 

Social media is about engagement and connecting with people who have an interest in you (you can tweet that quote if you want). It’s interactive, and it’s precisely the interactiveness that provides the benefit. The interaction enables you to make deeper connections with the people who care about you. 

Ever want to ask fellow jewelers about their experience with a particular product? Tweet it and wait for a response. Want to know if your customers like your new packaging? Post the question on Facebook and wait for a reply. Or better yet, considering changing your packaging? Take some photos of the options and post on your FB page, take a survey, garner feedback…directly from the people who matter! What could be better? 

This really can be fun, and in my opinion it should be. 

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What I’m finding are a lot of businesses that have blinders on. They tweet and post and don’t really care what you have to say. In fact, look at the posts and tweets of many small businesses and you’ll see for yourself what I mean. Posting about how great you are or your sales (or any one-way sales message for that matter) does not encourage engagement. 

It needs to feel authentic and transparent to be believed to be more than sales. 

In closing, watch what people are saying about you and have the courtesy to reply. Strike up a conversation with people who follow you or that you have friended. Be genuine, and for goodness sake, people don’t just copy and paste information from another person’s tweet or post to make it look like it came from you. Give credit where credit is deserved: retweet, respect and reply. 

Don’t treat social media relationships any differently from how you would treat a person in the flesh…and everyone will benefit.

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Wilkerson Testimonials

Retirement Made Easy with Wilkerson

The store was a landmark in Topeka, Kansas, but after 80 years in business, it was time for Briman’s Leading Jewelers to close up shop. Third generation jeweler and owner Rob Briman says the decision wasn’t easy, but the sale that followed was — all thanks to Wilkerson. Briman had decided a year prior to the summer 2020 sale that he wanted to retire. With a pandemic in full force, he had plenty of questions and concerns. “We had no real way to know if we were going to be successful or have a failure on our hands,” says Briman. “We didn’t know what to expect.” But with Wilkerson in charge, the experience was “fantastic” and now there’s plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying a more secure retirement. “I would recommend Wilkerson to any retailer considering a going-out-of-business sale,” says Briman. “They’ll help you reach your financial goal. Our experience was a tremendous success.”

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Ignoring the benefit of social media

mm

Published

on

Yesterday’s post was my rant on the basic human need to feel loved 🙂 and many retailers are avoiding that need by not making it standard policy to greet each and every customer. I know, you say it’s policy and that by now, everyone knows this and encourages the basic hello…but trust me, it’s not. Try mystery shopping and see what happens.

Social media, while it feels different because of the perceived distance between people communicating with one another…isn’t. When I see a tweet for example, that you’ve posted and I reply to you…I’m trying to strike up a conversation with you.

 A few weeks ago, I tweeted a congratulations to a store for their recognition as a cool store. They ignored me! No reply. Nothing. My need for feeling loved was not met. 

Social media is about engagement and connecting with people who have an interest in you (you can tweet that quote if you want). It’s interactive, and it’s precisely the interactiveness that provides the benefit. The interaction enables you to make deeper connections with the people who care about you. 

Ever want to ask fellow jewelers about their experience with a particular product? Tweet it and wait for a response. Want to know if your customers like your new packaging? Post the question on Facebook and wait for a reply. Or better yet, considering changing your packaging? Take some photos of the options and post on your FB page, take a survey, garner feedback…directly from the people who matter! What could be better? 

Advertisement

This really can be fun, and in my opinion it should be. 

What I’m finding are a lot of businesses that have blinders on. They tweet and post and don’t really care what you have to say. In fact, look at the posts and tweets of many small businesses and you’ll see for yourself what I mean. Posting about how great you are or your sales (or any one-way sales message for that matter) does not encourage engagement. 

It needs to feel authentic and transparent to be believed to be more than sales. 

In closing, watch what people are saying about you and have the courtesy to reply. Strike up a conversation with people who follow you or that you have friended. Be genuine, and for goodness sake, people don’t just copy and paste information from another person’s tweet or post to make it look like it came from you. Give credit where credit is deserved: retweet, respect and reply. 

Don’t treat social media relationships any differently from how you would treat a person in the flesh…and everyone will benefit.

Advertisement

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

Retirement Made Easy with Wilkerson

The store was a landmark in Topeka, Kansas, but after 80 years in business, it was time for Briman’s Leading Jewelers to close up shop. Third generation jeweler and owner Rob Briman says the decision wasn’t easy, but the sale that followed was — all thanks to Wilkerson. Briman had decided a year prior to the summer 2020 sale that he wanted to retire. With a pandemic in full force, he had plenty of questions and concerns. “We had no real way to know if we were going to be successful or have a failure on our hands,” says Briman. “We didn’t know what to expect.” But with Wilkerson in charge, the experience was “fantastic” and now there’s plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying a more secure retirement. “I would recommend Wilkerson to any retailer considering a going-out-of-business sale,” says Briman. “They’ll help you reach your financial goal. Our experience was a tremendous success.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular