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Inbox: October 2015

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INSTORE’s September issue had readers falling in love.

BRIDAL BRAVO!

Love the bridal issue (INSTORE, September). I’m probably going to go through it two or three more times. I want to make sure I get everything. — Linda Griffiths, Hoover’s Jewelers, Kearney, NE

This article originally appeared in the October 2015 edition of INSTORE.

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Dogs that Come Back to Bite

I have an issue with your advice regarding “dog” clearance (WorkSmart Daily Tips, Aug. 27). If you have a “dog” in the store why should you foist it on your good customers (or even your bad ones)? “Dogs” should be returned to the vendor, melted down or whatever else is necessary to get rid of them. When you sell it to a customer how do you think that is going to reflect on your store? The customer is going to show it around, and everyone is going to say, “Where in the world did you get that ugly thing?” And then it’s going to be your store that is mentioned. Do you think they will ever go back to the store that sold that to them? You have a “dog” in the store? Get rid of it, but please don’t sell it to a customer if you ever want them back again. — Daniel R. Spirer, Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, Cambridge, MA


Keep Chugging

The future of the independent jewelry industry seems so dismal and uncertain in all current articles. For someone who is taking over a third-generation, family-run business, it creates an unnecessary anxiety. In my opinion, a business owner should try their hardest to be innovative and provide the best service possible. If they make it through, then great; if not, at least they tried their best! Forget what other people are saying, and keep chugging along. — Jill Hornik, Jae’s Jewelers, Coral Gables, FL

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Betting on Boomers

For all the talk about new generations, I think the strongest customer base for the next 20 years will still be the boomers. They have desires, cash and want to buy from a real person who cares. These clients make discretionary purchases as well as buy bridal jewelry, because of divorces, deaths and remarriages. And they like larger stones and better-made jewelry. — Ed Menk, E. L. Menk Jewelers, Brainerd, MN

Send your letter to INSTORE’s editors at [email protected].

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Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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Inbox

Inbox: October 2015

Published

on

INSTORE’s September issue had readers falling in love.

BRIDAL BRAVO!

Love the bridal issue (INSTORE, September). I’m probably going to go through it two or three more times. I want to make sure I get everything. — Linda Griffiths, Hoover’s Jewelers, Kearney, NE

Advertisement

This article originally appeared in the October 2015 edition of INSTORE.


Dogs that Come Back to Bite

I have an issue with your advice regarding “dog” clearance (WorkSmart Daily Tips, Aug. 27). If you have a “dog” in the store why should you foist it on your good customers (or even your bad ones)? “Dogs” should be returned to the vendor, melted down or whatever else is necessary to get rid of them. When you sell it to a customer how do you think that is going to reflect on your store? The customer is going to show it around, and everyone is going to say, “Where in the world did you get that ugly thing?” And then it’s going to be your store that is mentioned. Do you think they will ever go back to the store that sold that to them? You have a “dog” in the store? Get rid of it, but please don’t sell it to a customer if you ever want them back again. — Daniel R. Spirer, Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, Cambridge, MA


Keep Chugging

Advertisement

The future of the independent jewelry industry seems so dismal and uncertain in all current articles. For someone who is taking over a third-generation, family-run business, it creates an unnecessary anxiety. In my opinion, a business owner should try their hardest to be innovative and provide the best service possible. If they make it through, then great; if not, at least they tried their best! Forget what other people are saying, and keep chugging along. — Jill Hornik, Jae’s Jewelers, Coral Gables, FL


Betting on Boomers

For all the talk about new generations, I think the strongest customer base for the next 20 years will still be the boomers. They have desires, cash and want to buy from a real person who cares. These clients make discretionary purchases as well as buy bridal jewelry, because of divorces, deaths and remarriages. And they like larger stones and better-made jewelry. — Ed Menk, E. L. Menk Jewelers, Brainerd, MN

Send your letter to INSTORE’s editors at [email protected].

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular