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Instead of Listening to Reply, Try Listening to Understand

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Why it is true: The biggest communication problem in our lives today is that we only listen to reply instead of listening to understand.

Plan of action: Carefully examine the number of situations in your store when your instructions were not followed. Ask the responsible employee specific questions about it. Look them in the eye, ask follow-up questions, give them the opportunity to really participate in the solution. This action is not intended to penalize them, but rather to let them know that you consider them to be a contributing member of your team. As a bonus, you might get a remarkable response that will continue to move your business forward.

David W. Richardson CSP, Jewelry Sales Training International


This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of INSTORE.

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Put Your Trust in Wilkerson

To do business successfully with anyone, you need a certain “comfort level.” That’s something that Phillips Pitts, owner of two Parris Jewelers stores in Hattiesburg, Miss., said he felt immediately when he first talked to Wilkerson’s Rick Hayes. He was just about to launch an anniversary sale. And he chose Wilkerson to handle all the details — from the marketing to the sales floor. “Rick cared what was going to happen to Parris Jewelers,” says Pitts. “Not just during the sale but after the sale.” Would he recommend Wilkerson to other jewelers contemplating a large-scale sale? Absolutely, says Pitts, who says the results “exceeded their expectations.” His trust in Wilkerson has only grown after the numbers came in. “They were interested in me fulfilling and what I need to fulfill to make my company better.”

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Dave Richardson

Instead of Listening to Reply, Try Listening to Understand

mm

Published

on

Why it is true: The biggest communication problem in our lives today is that we only listen to reply instead of listening to understand.

Plan of action: Carefully examine the number of situations in your store when your instructions were not followed. Ask the responsible employee specific questions about it. Look them in the eye, ask follow-up questions, give them the opportunity to really participate in the solution. This action is not intended to penalize them, but rather to let them know that you consider them to be a contributing member of your team. As a bonus, you might get a remarkable response that will continue to move your business forward.

David W. Richardson CSP, Jewelry Sales Training International


This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of INSTORE.

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Put Your Trust in Wilkerson

To do business successfully with anyone, you need a certain “comfort level.” That’s something that Phillips Pitts, owner of two Parris Jewelers stores in Hattiesburg, Miss., said he felt immediately when he first talked to Wilkerson’s Rick Hayes. He was just about to launch an anniversary sale. And he chose Wilkerson to handle all the details — from the marketing to the sales floor. “Rick cared what was going to happen to Parris Jewelers,” says Pitts. “Not just during the sale but after the sale.” Would he recommend Wilkerson to other jewelers contemplating a large-scale sale? Absolutely, says Pitts, who says the results “exceeded their expectations.” His trust in Wilkerson has only grown after the numbers came in. “They were interested in me fulfilling and what I need to fulfill to make my company better.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular