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Do You Or Don't You?

Is a Big Brand Store-in-Store a Fit for You? See What Other Jewelers Say

Four-fifths of jewelers say “no”.

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THIS MONTH’S QUESTION: Do you have a “store-in-store” area for a big jewelry or watch brand?

Yes: 18%

  • We have a Rolex corner. It seems to work well to emphasize the brand and show the product, thus creating more sales. Obviously, you could not do a separate selling area for every product but, then again, Rolex is not every product. Bob Richards, Bob Richards Jewelers, Germantown, TN
  • Alex and Ani; it works well as customers are “trained” to go there for latest styles. Christi Weaver, The Polished Edge, Liberty, MO
  • Built Rolex store in store in one of our locations. Sales doubled. Put Pandora shop-in-shop. Sales flat. Bill Levine, Van Cott Jewelers, Vestal, NY
  • Just upgraded to a Pandora shop-in-shop this January. We blew out an office and it really brightens up and dresses up our showroom and store. Julie Terwilliger, Wexford Jewelers, Cadillac, MI
  • It makes the brand stand out, and people are all about brands. Brenda Hefner, Oz’s Jewelers, Hickory, NC
  • Rolex and Hearts on Fire; they work well. Both are attractive and draw the attention they should. Kim Hatchell, Galloway & Moseley, Sumter, SC
  • Verragio is my “store in-store” and I am not sure it has been of great benefit. Maria Aguirre, Benold’s Jewelers, Austin, TX
  • Hearts on Fire has an area in our store, as does Rolex and Pandora. Other than the fact the vendors like these areas updated frequently, they have worked well. Lets the customer know that the particular brand is important to you and not going away anytime soon. The privacy is also nice. Only problem is we are very branded and everyone wants a space. Steve Floyd, Floyd & Green, Aiken, SC
  • It is going in the store this week. Stay tuned. I cheated a bit on the answer. Up until now, it was our Hearts On Fire area. That worked great until the recession, then everything turned to s*&!. David Blitt, Troy Shoppe Jewellers, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • It’s a fashion line that has created traffic and new customers; we look at it as part of our marketing money. Connie Stagner, Acori Diamonds & Design, Friendswood, TX
  • We have a Pandora shop-in-shop, and although is has slipped, it’s still profitable. Mike Doland Doland Jewelers, Dubuque, IA
  • People love important brands to be highlighted. Whitehouse deserves center of room currently. Eileen Eichhorn, Eichhorn Jewelry, Decatur, IN
  • I built out the “Watchatorium,” kinda a man’s cave for my high end pre-owned and the authorized brands I carry. Brian McCall, Midwest Jewelers and Estate Buyers, Zionsville, IN
  • All watch brands are in their own areas as are several prominent bridal brands. Gary Richmond, Van Horne & Co., Granger, IN
  • Caravelle & Belair. We are downtown but don’t have clientele for high scale watches. Shevvy Baker, SPB Designs, Louisville, KY
  • We have segregated areas in the store for ease of shopping. Hamilton Watches – Citizen Eco Brand Watches – Fossil Brand Watches. All the colored gems are in coordinated areas; designer product separate from the rest and silver is “here and there” that fills in. We are a supporter of local and area artists as well – that do (sell) better at this time of year. Doug Mitchell, UniQ Jewelry Gallery, Three Rivers, MI
  • Great Roberto Coin entire front of store in a circular case!! Teddie Gause, Gause and Son Jewelers, Ocala, FL
  • Pandora — just went store-in-store in early November 2017. Still too early to tell; customers seem to like the new look so far. We’ll know better after our Christmas season. Kriss Roethlisberger, Ace of Diamnds, Mt.Pleasant, MI
  • We have a store-in-store for Slate and Tell. We have a simple white cabinet with their product show cased on top. It is a good place for people to stop and look and it causes people to ask questions about the product. Erica Lorenz, Michael & Sons, Reno, NV

NO:  82%

  • We had one and it makes a great impression but is very expensive, and most of the brands are not respectful of our design wishes, just theirs. Susan Eisen, Susan Eisen Fine Jewelry & Watches, El Paso, TX
  • We use to carry Pandora (and had a shop-in-shop). Once we stopped carrying the line, we converted that corner of the store to feature an in-house designer with similar price points. She has hundreds of pieces on display and they were all made at our store … it’s been a great transition out of the bead corner. Jen Foster, David Douglas Designs, Marietta, GA
  • We have an open style where our higher brands are in sight lines with other lines. All lines are equal so there is no feeling of “I can’t afford those.” Instead, it’s “Oh, let me look at these as well.” No fear in looking and no snob appeal approach. Scott Kelly, Jems Jewels & Gold, North Wales, PA
  • I have a problem supporting “the machine” of box store jewelry that is manufactured outside the USA and lining the pockets of big wigs at the expense of the people overseas they barely pay to put the stuff together. I want to keep my money supporting American jobs — paying for dance classes, mortgages, groceries, and vacations of the individuals who actually make the jewelry I sell. Jennifer Farnes, Revolution Jewelry Works, Colorado Springs, CO
  • Been there done that, screwed every time by manufacturers of high-end brands that get a customer base and then go direct to our customers. Tried it, so no more. Janice A. Niebauer, Jan & Dan’s Jewelry, Erie, PA
  • We closed out of one brand this year. We just got tired of the way they were with their retailers. Not very good to work with, too many restrictions and purchasing requirements. It is easier to deal with when you are selling tons of product, but ultimately we make the decisions in our store. Nathan George, Joshua’s Fine Jewelry, Russellville, AR
  • We’re in a “small town” city and our store is too pretty to try and make it look like a Pandora store! We have all hardwood and slate interiors with vaulted ceilings. When someone asks you to paint that white, you say, “No thank you!!” Mary Jo Chanski, Hannoush Jewelers, Rutland, VT
  • I don’t carry any kind of inventory that I haven’t made myself. No outside vendors. Janne Etz, Contemporary Concepts, Cocoa, FL
  • We do not carry big jewelry or watch brands because we have a smaller store with limited space. We fill our cases with Jewelry we make. Frank Salinardi, Linardi’s Jewelers, Plantation, FL
  • Not a brand store. Steve Doubleday, Amidon Jewelers, West Lebanon, NH
  • Don’t carry watches or many major brands that would warrant a shop-in-shop. Bill Elliott, Ross Elliott Jewelers, Terre Haute, IN
  • Our big feature – most space – is devoted to what we make in house. Cliff Yankovich, Chimera Design, Lowell, MI
  • I am small no time for other brands then my own. Klaus Kutter, A Jour Inc, Bristol, RI
  • We are not big enough to interest those guys. Loann Stokes, Stokes Jewelry, Stillwater, MN
  • Not enough room to waste. Craig C. Curtis, Belfast Jewelry, Belfast, ME 
  • We operate with “departments” or cases organized in groups to feature specific products … watches, bridal, designer, estate, artisan glass, and so on. Mark Kasuba, M. Edward Jewelers, Pittsfield, MA
  • We choose not to carry big brands. Chris Wattsson, Wattsson & Wattsson Jewelers, Marquette, MI
  • We do not advertise other brands. We are the brand. Russell Criswell, Vulcan’s Forge, Kansas City, MO
  • We are an old downtown store and space is not adequate for large displays, so we do small ones. We do have sections for our best sellers; Naladi bridal, Honora pearls, Berco sterling, Colore sterling color, Carla earrings, Chatham color and Lashbrook men’s wedding bands. John Hayes, Goodman’s Jewelers, Madison, WI
  • I plan to possibly add a Simon G. boutique to my store in 2018. Donnie Blanton, Brittany’s Fine Jewelry, Gainesville, FL
  • We are in a small area and distinctive brands don’t sell well enough for us. Sue Parker, Nyman Jewelers, Excanaba, MI
  • Do not appreciate outside interests dictating how I run my store. Dale Thompson, Ken K. Thompson Jewelry, Bemidji, MN
  • No. I’m here to brand my name and image, not theirs. Marc Majors, Sam L. Majors, Midland, TX
  • My store is MY BRAND, Linnea’s Custom, why would I let someone dictate to me how much I have to purchase and repurchase. I’ve watched my contemporaries struggle to match Brands Demands, not pretty. Besides I like my bank account like my store fluid and full! Denise Oros, Linnea Jewelers, La Grange, IL

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. jewelry store, you’re invited to join the INSTORE Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the jewelry industry. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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Do You Or Don't You?

Yes or No: Print Advertising for the Holidays?

Our Brain Squad weighs in.

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Yes: 54%

  • People look for jewelry at the holiday season more than other times. — Steve & Alice Wittels, Aljan Jewelers, Mahopac, NY
  • There are still people in our area who get the local daily paper. Demo probably 45 years and up. — Cindy Fuller, Fuller Designs, Poplar Bluff, MO
  • We have a clientele that encompasses all ages. Older clients still follow and advertise using traditional methods. We still have to do everything. — Jon Walp, Long Jewelers, Virginia Beach, VA
  • We have a weekly newspaper in our small town and we advertise every single week of the year. Ironically, our print ads are our most effective form of media. v Nicole Shannon, Keir Fine Jewelry, Whistler, BC
  • We receive co-op for some vendors. Seems more people are looking at print during the holidays. — Brenda Hefner, Oz’s Jewelers, Hickory, NC
  • Christmas catalog is the only print media that works for us. — Joe Thacker, Thacker Jewelry, Lubbock, TX
  • People still respond to print! Postcards, ads in popular local magazines. Some of our customer base is still not digital. — Kim Hatchell, Galloway & Moseley, Sumter, SC
  • We do very little in print. We focus more on direct mail, email blasts and social media. We feel that you just don’t get the bang for the buck with print today. — David Lindsay, Purdy’s Jewellery & Gems, Bobcaygeon, ON
  • I believe that you need to utilize all levels of marketing in today’s world. Print reaches an older generation that is not as comfortable with social media. As well. I believe that with social media at times, it feels like you are bombarded with ads. — Stacey Gemici-Saunders, Gelmici Jewellers, Edson, AB
  • I only run print ads in November and December, with the bulk in November because we are a custom shop. I cut print advertising by 70 percent this year, and our numbers are running neck-and-neck with last year. Social media brings customers to us far better than print ad ever did. — Jo Goralski, The Jewelry Mechanic, Oconomowoc, WI
  • I use it to feature a specific product (i.e., diamond stud earrings) or some other item that I may stock in anticipation of a trend for the holidays. Small ads as a reminder. — Murphy McMahon, Murphy McMahon & Co., Kalispell, MT
  • Though it has lost its effectiveness, our older customers are almost exclusively receptive to print advertising. — Steven Wardle, Forest Beach Design, Chatham, MA
  • Even though the Houston Chronicle only has a circulation of about 7 percent of the population, that readership is a core demo for the holiday jewelry buyer: male, educated, employed, disposable income … and it provides an immediacy that no other media replicates. — Rex Solomon, Houston Jewelry, Houston, TX

No: 46%

  • Doesn’t work well in my area. — Laura Pool, Laura’s Jewelry Designs, St. Robert, MO
  • Diminishing results for last decade. Finally redistributed entire ad budget. Switched to social media. Still doing direct mail but no newspapers, shoppers guides, etc. — Robert Borneman, Diamond Jewelers, Centereach, NY
  • Too much money and no guarantee to increase sales. — Tommy Thobe, The Village Gem, Perry Hall, MD
  • I do not. I think billboards, social media and email marketing are much more cost effective, and I like the idea that you can target a specific audience. — Michael Kanoff, Michael’s Jewelers, Yardley, PA
  • Not this year; will be doing more radio. — Cathy Graves, Ellis Jewelers, Frankfort, IN
  • Digital works better for us. — Tim Sherrer, Lou’s Jewelry, Mobile, AL
  • Circulation in the newspaper business has decreased, and those reading already have most of their jewelry wardrobe. — Laurie Cusher, Hyde Park Jeweler, Hyde Park, NY
  • It stopped working. — Ken A. Apland, Apland Inc., Hood River, OR
  • I used to send direct mail. I am planning not to this year. Emails are working; why waste the dollars. — Varsenne Massoyan, Massoyan Jewelers, Old Tappan, NJ

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. jewelry store, you’re invited to join the INSTORE Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the jewelry industry. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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Do You Or Don't You?

Try To Sell Wedding Bands With the Engagement Ring? Our Brain Squad Is Almost Split

Slightly more jewelers say ‘don’t do it.’

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THIS MONTH’S QUESTION: Do you try to broach the wedding band sale immediately after closing the engagement ring sale?

Yes: 45%

  • We offer a credit based on the amount of the engagement ring purchased towards wedding bands. We mainly let the customers know that, and if they want to look, we do. — Rick Sanders, Sanders Jewelers, Gainesville, FL
  • Actually I mention it before we close the engagement sale: “What band will we be making to match?” — Russell Criswell, Vulcan’s Forge, Kansas City, MO
  • We offer a coupon for money off both their wedding bands when an engagement ring is sold. It does well for us, too. — Beth Cevasco, Scott’s Custom Jewelers, Fairlawn, OH
  • Many years ago, I read that statistically, people don’t even buy their bands from the same store as they buy their engagement ring. From that time on, I’ve always at least planted the seed and often offer an incentive to have the clients come back. After all, you’ve already done the heavy lifting. Why not finish the job? — Jon Walp, Long Jewelers, Virginia Beach, VA
  • I like to show all the options available when the engagement ring is here and the customer is excited. Also, many guys don’t necessarily think about rings for themselves, and they start to have fun looking. It’s finally their turn! — Robin Lies, Burnells Creative Gold, Wichita, KS
  • They are in a happy, excited mood and still in the buying mood. — Paul Reiniger, Reiniger Jewelers, Swansea, IL
  • Why … to educate, to create satisfaction with our product quality/care/maintenance plans, to create additional ring sales and to create lifelong customers/friends and referrals. I always tell people that they want to consider the type of band that will be worn with the ring (integrated, contour, stacked … ), that guys tend to get a few alternative bands for fashion, and that we offer a Tough Love silicone band to each of them complimentary as we’re describing best care for fine jewelry. — Jill Keith, Enchanted Jewelry, Danielson, CT
  • Always looking for the add-on sale because if you don’t ask, you will not always get it. — Rick Nichols, Nassau Jewelry, Fernandina Beach, FL
  • If they decide on a ring that does not have a matching wedding band, then they need to start thinking about having one made right now if they are going to consider more than one ring. I have had customers come in a week before the wedding and want a band that will have to be custom-made. We can’t usually help them at that late date. Even if they don’t purchase now, they need to be thinking about a band for the guy and the girl. — Murphy McMahon, Murphy McMahon & Co., Kalispell, MT

No: 55%

  • I don’t ever pressure my customers to buy anything. I don’t like it and would never do such a thing to them. — Craig C. Curtis, Belfast Jewelry, Belfast, ME
  • Only if we are custom-making an engagement ring do we approach the band sale at that time. We have found in our area that an engagement might take a year or few, and we do not want to push the issue and lose the engagement sale. — Tim Wright, Simply Unique Jewelry Designs, Yorktown, VA
  • They are usually exhausted from the decision-making, if they were selecting as a couple. If he’s making the decision alone, HIS band is the last thing on his mind! The exception is for same-sex couples. We look for both together — it’s cool! — Debbie Fox, Fox Fine Jewelry, Ventura, CA
  • Still in shock from selling the engagement ring. — Bill Elliott, Ross Elliott Jewelers, Terre Haute, IN
  • Why ruin the moment? If it needs to be resized or they bring it in for cleaning, then we will bring the wedding bands up. — Donald Killelea, Killelea Jewelers, Midlothian, IL
  • Too pushy. If you’ve done a good job, the chances are high you’ll get an opportunity down the road. — Bob Goodman, Robert Goodman Jewelers, Zionsville, IN
  • We always let the buyer know that they will receive a discount on their bands as a reward for buying the engagement from us. When we meet the bride-to-be is when we really drive that point home. The guy has forgotten every detail as soon as his feet hit the curb. We feel it’s better to let him get out of the store feeling excited about what he’s about to do and follow up with the bride-to-be a few weeks later. We have over 90 percent conversion on wedding band sales to clients who bought their engagement from us. — Mark Snyder, Snyder Jewelers, Weymouth, MA
  • I should. I get lazy. — Steven B. Goldfarb, Alvin Goldfarb Jeweler, Bellevue, WA
  • Relationships take time to form and evolve. Things should happen in gradual steps. First maybe the engagement ring, next would be a birthday or holiday gift. I should also see her a few times for a cleaning where we can talk about the wedding planning process and than bring up wedding bands, wedding gifts and something borrowed. — Christopher Sarraf, Nuha Jewelers, Plainview, NY

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. jewelry store, you’re invited to join the INSTORE Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the jewelry industry. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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Do You Or Don't You?

Discounts For Cash Payments? 6 Out of 10 Brain Squad Members Say Yes

Most jewelers will offer at least a small discount for dollars.

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Yes: 60%

  • If cash, the discount can be 4 percent, but usually only offered if the customer keeps insisting on a discount. — Spencer K., Sheridan, WY
  • 3 percent. It’s what I would pay to run a credit card. — Kelly J., Sammamish, WA
  • No matter how low I go on a sale, I always leave 2-4 percent for a credit card. If a client offers cash (or a check), I will give them 1-3 percent off, depending on the item. The credit card companies have created a truly dependent society. Everyone uses them for every purchase. Clients do not even KNOW that there is a fee to the vendor! We receive our 1099 every year from Mastercard/Visa and we could pay another employee a full salary with what we pay them just to accept cards. It’s crazy and nobody even knows! — Mark S., Weymouth, MA
  • Courtesy 10 percent if asked for. — Gordon L., Santa Fe, NM
  • With repeat customers, I like to offer them a discount as an incentive to keep coming back. — James S., McMinnville, TN
  • Usually 10-15 percent, if at all. Not too often, but some customers are insistent, and it’s not usually the millennials. — Cathy M., Austin, TX
  • If they ask, I’ll give them up to 20 percent off of in-case items, never any discount for custom or repairs. — David P., Durham, NC
  • Depends on how often the customer buys from me and how long I’ve had the piece. Maybe 30 percent off. I have a month-long clearance in September, which most of my customers wait for. — Laura P., St. Robert, MO
  • 2-5 percent. I’d rather give it to my customers than the credit card company. — David E., Tacoma, WA
  • I offer my credit card discount if someone is haggling and only for dollars. A check will not do. — Paula D., Asheville, NC
  • When someone negotiates in cash, I am happy to offer them the 3 percent discount for what it would cost me in credit card fees. However, I always respond to them by saying, “I look terrible in orange” (meaning going to jail in an orange jumpsuit), and we pause and chuckle a moment, and then I further explain that I will still be giving you a receipt for this purchase, on which I will need to include sales tax. Reminding them that sales tax is “collected” for our state … and I am obligated to collect it. It is NOT my money. Most of the time, they understand and are grateful for the additional 3 percent. — Rita W., Rocky Mount, NC
  • 20-30 percent. No choice. Everything is available everywhere for cheaper. — Christopher S., Plainview, NY
  • The discount depends when I purchased the item and at what gold market I paid. Some items will get a 30-35 percent savings. — Anonymous

No: 40%

  • The customers who are offering cash are usually expecting big discounts for cash, and that is not our business model. It all goes in the register and on the books, so our savings are less than 2 percent, so they usually plunk down a card. — Alan L., Cape May, NJ
  • We stick with one price for everyone … cash, charge, rich or poor, frequent flier or new customer. Our egalitarian mindset may cost us a sale every so often, but in the long run, our clients have learned that we are not desperate and that they receive the best value. “You can get money anywhere, but this one-of-a-kind piece … only here. Sorry, we don’t discount.” — Steven W., Chatham, MA
  • In order to offer a discount, you need to add dollars to the price up front. When you do this, where do you stop and who do you offer this to? It is kinda like a stripper: they have to put on the garments before they can remove them. I know that this comparison is crude, but think about it and determine what kind of business person you want to be. My pricing scheme is to charge all customers the same and not play favorites. I know that I lose some customers because I don’t give discounts, but I have very loyal customers that would abandon me if I were to offer discounts. If you explain that you price your product correctly to start with, most customers understand. — Ed M., Brainerd, MN
  • Never. Our credit card merchant agreements state that it is against the contracts to offer a discount for a payment that is other than having the customer use the respective credit card. Additionally, our bank charges our company a cash handling charge and we have to fill out a lot of paperwork when people pay with cash. Bottom line: the price is what it is. — Andrea R., El Dorado Hills, CA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. jewelry store, you’re invited to join the INSTORE Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the jewelry industry. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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