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Jeweler Must Cough Up $300,000 After Allegedly Duping Baseball Star into Buying Low-Quality Jewelry

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Judge rules that the transaction with David Ortiz was “done in bad faith.”

California jeweler Randy Hamida was ordered by a court to pay $318,800 to David Ortiz after he allegedly duped the Red Sox slugger into paying a hefty sum for low-quality jewelry that was sold under false pretenses, the Boston Globe reports. The article says that Ortiz agreed to buy jewelry from Hamida that he claimed was made of precious metals, diamonds and gems and worth more than $127,000; Ortiz then paid $80,000 and also traded in a gold necklace and bracelet.

But soon after, the article says, Ortiz discovered that the jewelry was worth far less than $127,000 and, as the judge wrote, “was not in all cases composed of the precious metals and gems of which Hamida had claimed them to be composed”. When Ortiz demanded the return of his money as well as the necklace and bracelet, Hamida allegedly agreed but never followed through. In his ruling, the judge wrote that Hamida made “false representations” and said his “failure to deliver jewelry of the kind and value agreed upon was done in bad faith.”

Read more at the Boston Globe

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