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Jewelers Describe Their Edgiest Ad Campaigns

What do you mean that ad is offensive?!

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JEWELERS ARE ALWAYS FACED with walking that fine line between trying to inject a bit of fun into their brand message and coming up with the kind of experiment that gets half the town to call with “I’ll never shop there again!” complaints.

One question from Big Survey 2017 was: “Describe the edgiest advertising campaign you’ve done. What was the reaction to it?”

“Many of our billboards are edgy but in good taste,” one respondent says. “Two studs and one lady raised some eyebrows.”

Below are some of the responses we received. Where do you draw the line? Look out for all the results of the 2017 Big Survey in the upcoming October edition of INSTORE.

  • When gay marriage was still a hot button and in the courts, we ran an ad featuring two grooms showing off their bands at the altar. The text read, “We can’t make the laws but we can make your day. Everyone is welcome at Drummond’s.” We got backlash from some self-described conservatives, but we got a lot of praise, and new customers, too.
  • Print campaign: “Put a little ice down her blouse.” We had calls about it being inappropriate.
  • My wife said, “This’ll blow her pants off,” in a radio spot. People thought it was funny.
  • “This ring will make her clothes fall off” (our college rep ran it without permission). No one was really thrilled about that.
  • A TV spot targeting young men featured a young lady in underwear crawling over a young man’s lap because he gave her a piece of jewelry. Reaction from the intended audience was good; we seemed hip. The spot mistakenly aired during an NFL game and we received calls about the ad’s inappropriateness from middle-aged conservative women.
  • We did a commercial with a lady, and I asked to see her diamond. She said, “It’s a half-carat and we’ve been married 25 years. “My daughter-in-law has a 2-carat.” I say, “It’s time to trade up the diamond or trade up the husband.” Male customers called me with all kinds of hate.
  • We utilized one of our pear-shaped diamonds and a hand-fabricated copyrighted ring design with a stunning Coke bottle-like silhouette and the tag “pear shapes are sexy no matter the medium.” We enjoyed the chance to be cheeky.
  • A picture of a guy wearing only a dresser drawer. He had a bubble above his head that said, “Do you have valuables in your drawers?”

This article originally appeared in the October 2017 edition of INSTORE.

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Shane Decker

The Difference Between Closes and Statements, 7 Lead-In Lines and More Sales Advice

Here’s how to make closing sales easier, says Shane Decker.

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HAVE YOU EVER made something that should have been easy difficult? Maybe you overthought it, or you were afraid to try. Or you were worried what someone else would think.

Salespeople tell me all the time, “I tried that and it didn’t work.” But my observation is that people often try something once, fail at it, and then give up. They’ve proven to themselves that something new does not work.

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You have to want to make the effort and put in the time and practice to build new habits, especially when it comes to what I call “needle movers.”

Needle movers are actions that put money in the cash register immediately. The three big needle movers are closing, adding on and wowing clients. These should be easy, but we make them hard because of fear, lack of experience, or lack of selling skills.

It’s time to get over that fear of change. Have your team write 10 new closes, and make sure they’re not statements. For example:

Statement: “That is a beautiful diamond.”

Close: “She’s going to love wearing that beautiful diamond, and you’re gonna be glad you gave it to her.”

Then have them write 10 lead-in lines for add-on sales. Do not say, “Can I,” “May I” or “Would you like?” Clients can say no to all of these. Examples of lead-in lines to create add-on sales are:

“We have what matches.”

“This is part of a set.”

“She won’t wear this without the matching.”

“Tell me something else she’s always wanted but you haven’t purchased yet.”

Then, have your sales team write 10 lead-in lines to create a sale from scratch. This is what you say to a client when they’re waiting for a battery or repair. Examples include:

“Guess what’s in the vault?”

“Gotta show you my favorite.”

“Guess what just came in.”

These must be said with passion and enthusiasm. They allow you to wow the client and change their experience while they wait. Remember: You have to do something to make something happen. Clients buy on impulse all the time.

Practice with your team and make these phrases come naturally. Start all of these presentations with a lead-in line, and the rest will happen by itself. Clients do not get mad when you show them something gorgeous.

But you have to hold yourself accountable, and there has to be consistency. For some reason, it’s easier to fall back on old bad habits than keep good ones. Winging it doesn’t work. Practice with each other over and over until the simple truly is simple.

Creating is better than waiting. Get comfortable with your sales skills. Be the sales associate your client wants you to be.

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What You Can Learn About Jewelry Retailing From Airbnb

Rather than creating an average experience, consider what an 11-star experience would look like.

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AIRBNB IS A hotel alternative tech startup that has been on a meteoric rise over the past decade. That’s great for them, but what does it have to do with your jewelry store? A lot, actually.

Let’s take a close look at Airbnb’s creative process, break it down, and translate it so it can work for you in your store.

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Focus on delighting your customers. Think in terms of providing an experience rather than just selling jewelry. You might consider Airbnb as simply a hotel alternative, but they are successful because they’re so focused on the experience they provide. Here’s what Airbnb advises: “Hand serve your customers. Win them over, one by one. And don’t stop until you know exactly what they want.”

To create the experience their customers wanted, they asked them! They got to know their users. They asked them with openness and genuine curiosity what they wanted so that they could hit the mark in what they offered. People will share their opinions with you — all you have to do is ask, and then act on what you hear.

Shoot for 11 stars on a 5-star scale … then rein it in. Airbnb’s design process encourages you to let your imagination run wild. Don’t ask, “How do I make this better?” Instead, ask how you might completely blow someone away. Dream really big, and then think about what’s feasible within that dream. It’s much easier to be creative if you take away all the limits.

In Airbnb’s world, a 5-star check-in experience would be, “You knock on the door, they open the door, they let you in.” Getting creative, an 11-star experience would be “I’d get off the plane and it would be like The Beatles arriving: There’d be 5,000 high school kids cheering my name with cars welcoming me to the country. I’d get to the front yard of your house and there’d be a press conference for me.” With 11 stars, Elon Musk would meet you at the airport and say, “You’re going to space.”

Translating that to jewelry retailing, a five-star check in would be simply greeting the customer. An 11-star check in would be showing up at your customer’s house in a limo or helicopter, champagne and treats for the ride over, the store is closed to the public, and every piece they’re shown fits their taste and budget exactly.

You’re probably not going to pick your customers up in a helicopter, but experiment and aim for the sweet spot within your grand ideas. Pull some pieces aside if you know a customer is coming in. Auction off a special after-hours shopping party with drinks and light bites for the winner and their friends. Create a unique and memorable experience, and your customers will connect with you and want to come back.

Iterate like a great tech company. Experiment and see what kind of response you’re getting. Some ideas will work, and others won’t, and that’s totally okay — you need to find the right combination for your business. Set goals, then pay close attention to what’s working and what’s not. You won’t know if you’re succeeding unless you measure the results of your efforts. Adjust what you’re doing and see how things change. This all boils down to a process of continuous improvement and iteration.

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Here Are Three Ways to Beat Online Retailers

These are services that they simply can’t offer … but you can.

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HOW DO YOU fight online competition? By focusing on the things that they simply can’t do, namely service.

Here are three areas where you can use the service aspect of your business to your advantage and increase your service revenue stream.

Watch Batteries and Watchbands

I’m constantly amazed at how many jewelers either don’t sell watch batteries and watchbands or don’t take full advantage of the opportunity. I don’t know of another business that you can walk into and receive immediate service to fix a problem without an appointment. Yet, we jewelers do it all the time. When your customer has a problem that you fix on the spot, you’re adding value to the transaction. Start your standard watch batteries at $15 to $25 installed with a one-year warranty and never look back.

In-Store Repairs and Adjustments

So many people purchase watches online that need to be sized or adjusted. Some of them are so poorly made that they’re ridiculously hard to adjust or too large to size normally. There’s nothing wrong with charging $20 or $25 to fit a watchband to your customer’s wrist. They didn’t purchase it from you, and you’re certainly under no obligation to help them, but you’ve chosen to provide great customer service, so make sure you’re well compensated for your time and effort. This also applies to in-store repairs like closing jump rings, installing lobster claws, spring rings, etc. These are services that your customers can’t do themselves. Make sure you charge for your time, even if it’s only $5 or $10. It all adds up, and no one should work for free, especially when it wasn’t purchased from your store. We use the money generated from these adjustments to throw a great employee holiday party at the end of the year.

Custom Design Appointments

Most customers have no idea what goes into the preparation of a custom design project, whether it’s counter sketching, wax carving or actually doing a CAD. They come in with an idea that they want you to bring to life, and of course they want to know how much it will cost. By charging at least $100 for an initial consultation, which can be applied to the finished piece, you will immediately separate out those people that are simply information seekers from those customers who are serious and ready to start the process. If you’re not charging for that initial consultation, you’ll be taken advantage of time after time, as they will use your ideas and go somewhere else if they’re not satisfied with the price. By committing to pay you something up front, they are invested in the process and have an incentive to stay with you.

I’ve only listed three types of in-store services that will generate more income for your store, but there are many more. It’s important to keep in mind that your customer can’t go to Amazon or any online retailers to have these services done; they’re either not offered at all or are too prohibitively expensive and time-consuming to ship back and forth. They can be done offline by you, day after day, for a substantial profit.

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