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‘I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches’: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years

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‘I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches’: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years

You can learn a lot from an experienced jeweler about how to do things — and how not to do them.

For Big Survey 2016, we asked some questions designed to get jewelers thinking, and talking, about the past. If you’ve been in business for a while, you’ll surely relate to some of the answers below. And if you’re still early in your career, you’ll find some valuable advice.

In one question, we asked readers to tell us about “one thing you now do that you should have done in your early years.”

The answers would be music to the ears of many of our regular consultants. You’ve become better businesspeople and learned the lessons of experience.

Here are the top nine answers, along with the percentage of respondents who named them.

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  • Manage inventory better (10%)
     
  • Take more time off (9%)
     
  • Charge more for your goods, services and effort (6%)
     
  • These were followed by lighten up (6%)
     
  • delegate more (4%)
     
  • invest in technology, (4%)
     
  • Dsave more (3%)
     
  • specialize in a type of inventory or service (3%)
     
  • become financially literate (3%)
     

And as you’ve gotten older it seems you’ve gotten a little less interesting but more generous in providing specific advice such as:

  • Follow-up with every customer at least three times
  • Set up bank sale tax and employment/withholding tax accounts. (“It changed my cash flow issues”)
  • Eat more plants
  • Opened an Etsy store
  • Accept credit cards
  • Put a doorbell on the door so I can get more done in the workshop during business hours.
  • Buy in India
  • Not drink on the job.
  • Am less combative with my parents

 

<!– &#8216;I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches&#8217;: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years –>

We also asked you to tell us “one thing you used to do in your early years as a store owner that you no longer do.”

Many of you have learned how to step away from work in order to achieve more balance in your lives. The top three answers were:

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  • Micro-manage everything (13%)
     
  • Manage inventory better (10%)
     
  • Work too much / put in long hours (10%)
     
  • Worry/stress about things outside my control (5%)
     
  • Also earning multiple votes were lack of self-confidence (4%)
     
  • Taking MORE time off for vacation (4%).
     

Other, um, “interesting” responses included:

  • “Dress up.”
  • “Dress down.”
  • “Fart on command.”
  • “Have sex in the back room with my goldsmith, but then he had to hire help.”
  • “Live entirely on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.”
  • “Jump over the counter.”
  • “Only hire pretty girls.”
  • “Have hair.”
  • “A lot of drugs.”

 

 

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

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‘I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches’: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years

mm

Published

on

&#8216;I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches&#8217;: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years

You can learn a lot from an experienced jeweler about how to do things — and how not to do them.

For Big Survey 2016, we asked some questions designed to get jewelers thinking, and talking, about the past. If you’ve been in business for a while, you’ll surely relate to some of the answers below. And if you’re still early in your career, you’ll find some valuable advice.

In one question, we asked readers to tell us about “one thing you now do that you should have done in your early years.”

The answers would be music to the ears of many of our regular consultants. You’ve become better businesspeople and learned the lessons of experience.

Advertisement

Here are the top nine answers, along with the percentage of respondents who named them.

  • Manage inventory better (10%)
     
  • Take more time off (9%)
     
  • Charge more for your goods, services and effort (6%)
     
  • These were followed by lighten up (6%)
     
  • delegate more (4%)
     
  • invest in technology, (4%)
     
  • Dsave more (3%)
     
  • specialize in a type of inventory or service (3%)
     
  • become financially literate (3%)
     

And as you’ve gotten older it seems you’ve gotten a little less interesting but more generous in providing specific advice such as:

  • Follow-up with every customer at least three times
  • Set up bank sale tax and employment/withholding tax accounts. (“It changed my cash flow issues”)
  • Eat more plants
  • Opened an Etsy store
  • Accept credit cards
  • Put a doorbell on the door so I can get more done in the workshop during business hours.
  • Buy in India
  • Not drink on the job.
  • Am less combative with my parents

 

<!– &#8216;I Shoulda Lived on Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches&#8217;: Jewelers Reveal What They ‘Shoulda Done’ In Their Early Years –>

We also asked you to tell us “one thing you used to do in your early years as a store owner that you no longer do.”

Advertisement

Many of you have learned how to step away from work in order to achieve more balance in your lives. The top three answers were:

  • Micro-manage everything (13%)
     
  • Manage inventory better (10%)
     
  • Work too much / put in long hours (10%)
     
  • Worry/stress about things outside my control (5%)
     
  • Also earning multiple votes were lack of self-confidence (4%)
     
  • Taking MORE time off for vacation (4%).
     

Other, um, “interesting” responses included:

  • “Dress up.”
  • “Dress down.”
  • “Fart on command.”
  • “Have sex in the back room with my goldsmith, but then he had to hire help.”
  • “Live entirely on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.”
  • “Jump over the counter.”
  • “Only hire pretty girls.”
  • “Have hair.”
  • “A lot of drugs.”

 

 

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Sollberger’s

Going Out of Business Is an Emotional Journey. Wilkerson Is There to Make It Easier.

Jaki Cowan, the owner of Sollberger’s in Ridgeland, MS, decided the time was right to close up shop. The experience, she says, was like going into the great unknown. There were so many questions about the way to handle the store’s going-out-of-business sale. Luckily for Cowan, Wilkerson made the transition easier and managed everything, from marketing to markdowns.

“They think of everything that you don’t have the time to think of,” she says of the Wilkerson team that was assigned to manage the sale. And it was a total success, with financial goals met by Christmas with another sale month left to go.

Wilkerson even had a plan to manage things while Covid-19 restrictions were still in place. This included limiting the number of shoppers, masking and taking temperatures upon entrance. “We did everything we could to make the staff and public feel as safe as possible.”

Does she recommend Wilkerson to other retailers thinking of retiring, liquidating or selling excess merchandise? Absolutely. “If you are considering going out of business, it’s obviously an emotional journey. But truly rest assured that you’re in good hands with Wilkerson.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular