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Jewelry Chain Debuts an Outlet Model

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Two stores are being converted.

Rogers & Hollands Jewelers, which has 81 stores in 10 states, is converting two of its Chicago-area locations to an outlet model.

The stores will be rebranded, remodeled and reopened as Rogers & Hollands Outlet. Jewelry will be discounted at least 50 percent, and watches will be priced at a minimum of 35 percent off retail.

“Unlike typical outlet jewelry stores, Rogers & Hollands Outlet will offer completely unique merchandise that cannot be found at other Rogers & Hollands’ stores,” the chain said in a press release.

Each of the stores will undergo a one-day renovation before officially debuting as Rogers & Hollands Outlet on April 12 at North Riverside Park Mall and on April 20 at Golf Mill Shopping Center. Staff members at each location will stay the same.  

“We feel that the Outlet concept is a very good fit and will better meet the needs of our customers in these areas,” said Amber Willmer, Rogers Enterprises’ director of social and digital marketing.

Both Outlet locations will carry jewelry from brands such as Gabriel & Co. NY, Scott Kay, Tacori and Elle, as well as watches from Citizen, Movado, Bulova and Rado. High-end estate watches from Movado, Coach and Tissot will also be offered.

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The chain, founded in 1910, operates under the names of Rogers & Hollands Jewelers and Ashcroft & Oak Jewelers. It bills itself as the largest family-owned and operated jewelry chain in the U.S.

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