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Millennials Want to Learn — So Teach Them

Offer education to involve younger customers in the jewelry world.

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Along with the generation’s oft-recounted “delayed adulthood,” it appears there’s been some delayed development of basic skills among millennials as well, and a wave of companies want to be resources of information instead of just sources for products. Brands including The Home Depot, Procter & Gamble and Sherwin-Williams have all started offering classes and online tutorials to teach such basic skills as using a tape measure, mopping floors and mowing lawns. Millennials have shown they are eager to learn, so it might be worth giving some thought to what else millennials might not know how to do — cleaning silver, changing a watch battery, stringing beads—and how to incorporate those activities into offerings in a non-condescending way.

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When the Kids Have Their Own Careers, Wilkerson Can Help You to Retire

Alex and Gladys Rysman are the third generation to run Romm Jewelers in Brockton, Mass. And after many decades of service to the industry and their community, it was time to close the store and take advantage of some downtime. With three grown children who each had their own careers outside of the industry, they decided to call Wilkerson. Then, the Rysmans did what every jeweler should do: They called other retailers and asked about their own Wilkerson experience. “They all told us what a great experience it was and that’s what made us go with Wilkerson.” says Gladys Rysman. The results? Alex Rysman says he was impressed. “We exceeded whatever I expected to do by a large margin.”

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