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Photographer Annie Griffiths Highlights Forevermark’s Responsible Sourcing Efforts at Philanthropy Summit

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Annie Griffiths at Town & Country’s 2016 Philanthropy Summit

(Press Release)
NEW YORK, NY – Photographer Annie Griffiths shared her first-hand experience of the journey of a Forevermark diamond, highlighting the brand’s conservation efforts and support of the advancement of women at Town & Country’s third annual Philanthropy Summit on May 10. The summit, which took place at the New York Historical Society in New York City, brought together nearly 300 thought leaders, entrepreneurs, entertainers and influencers who are advocates of social change.

Griffiths, who is currently featured in “The T&C 50: The Top Philanthropists of 2016,” shared stories from her recent trip to Africa with Forevermark, where she visited The De Beers Group’s’ Orapa and Venetia diamond mines. There, she documented the wildlife and natural habitats protected at the conservation sites surrounding the mines. She also met several of the women who benefit from a series of enterprise development funds, including De Beers’ Zimele fund beneficiaries Sophia Mphuthi, an entrepreneur who started her own driving school in Kimberley, and Mercy Sithagu, a farmer who provides quality produce for her small village in Nwanedi in South Africa.

"On this trip I realized that there is a connection between diamonds and conservation. I also realized how much diamonds benefit local communities. The best investment anyone can make is in the future of women and girls," Griffiths said during her spotlight presentation.

Griffiths was one of the first women photographers at National Geographic and has photographed in more than 150 countries during her career. In addition to her editorial work, she is committed to photographing for aid organizations around the world. She is the founder and executive director of Ripple Effect Images, a collective of photographers who document the programs that are empowering women and girls throughout the developing world, especially as they deal with the effects of climate change.

“When we came across Annie Griffiths’ work, we loved the way she captures wildlife and nature and celebrates the beauty of women and their important contribution in local economies. It was the perfect collaboration for celebrating our promise of responsible sourcing,” says Charles Stanley, president of Forevermark US.

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Forevermark also debuted its first national responsible sourcing print ad in Town & Country’s June issue focused on philanthropy. The ad is part of the brand’s recently announced responsible sourcing-focused marketing campaign, which will feature print and digital creative, and will also highlight Forevermark’s initiatives that give back to the communities from which its diamonds come. A responsible sourcing toolkit is available to all Forevermark jewelers, enabling them to take advantage of this content in their local campaigns, on jeweler websites, and in-store.

Watch Forevermark’s short film Behind the Lens with Annie Griffiths here.

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