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Podcast: JimmyCast Takes on the Paradigm Shift in Jewelry Store Marketing

What do you do when what used to work isn’t working anymore?

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JIMMYCAST EPISODE 1: PARADIGM SHIFT (25:55 MINUTES)


Welcome to the first episode of JimmyCast, a new podcast from the INSTORE Podcast Network.

If you’re a regular consumer of INSTORE Online, then you probably know of Jimmy DeGroot. He produces the Jewelry Store Possible series of educational videos as well as the Gene the Jeweler series of satirical clips.

With JimmyCast, “The idea is we’re going to talk real,” Jimmy explains.  The show also features Doug Meadows of David Douglas Diamonds in Marietta, GA.

“We’re going to get at the real issues and talk about those things that could be a bit uncomfortable to talk about in a general publication setting,” he says. Jimmy is a highly experienced jewelry store manager who spends his time training teams around the world at jewelrystoretraining.com and sharing marketing advice through his blog site at jewelrymarketingguy.com.

In the inaugural episode, Jimmy and Doug talk about how things have changed in the jewelry retail business, and how to adapt when the old ways stop getting results. Doug even gets specific about how he is reinventing his own business.

“We have to try something different,” Doug says, “because what used to work in the past isn’t working.”

Listen to this and other industry insights on JimmyCast! You can catch the video version below.


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Show Notes/Show Chronology

Here are show notes of the conversation between Jimmy DeGroot and Doug Meadows.

  • 1:14 Doug talks about his store’s origins, and his move to warmer climes.
  • 1:59 Is David Douglas Diamonds the typical jewelry retailer in the U.S.?
  • 2:12 On the two types of jewelers.
  • 2:50 On the paradigm shift in how jewelry businesses are run.
  • 3:56 On the days when jewelers were selling “those big mambo herring-bone necklaces.”
  • 4:55 A discussion of the days when, as a jeweler, you hardly had to advertise at all, and yet everything was good.
  • 6:20 On how this podcast came to be.
  • 6:45 Doug talks about how he is reinventing himself. “We have to try something different, because what used to work in the past isn’t working.”
  • 9:00 On grassroots marketing efforts that work in the absence of a large marketing budget.
  • 12:06 Doug talks about the time he “went stupid” and expanded a grassroots marketing program to his whole county –including over 100 schools. He’s since cut back to 27 schools.
  • 14:24 “There is no magic marketing pill. No matter what it is, it’s still consistent work. A lot of work.”
  • 15:22 On what’s working for David Douglas Diamonds. Hint: “If you Google ‘moissanite Atlanta,’ nine times out of 10 we’re going to be the first organic search that shows up.”
  • 17:00 Doug on why he embraced moissanite 20 years ago.
  • 17:35 On the importance of getting more customers through the door, buying at lower price points.
  • 20:30 A discussion of “that guy who is lying to his girlfriend about moissanite.”
  • 21:10 An inspirational story of a guy who embraced inbound marketing by answering questions on his blog.
  • 23:08 Doug explains, “I’m constantly asking myself, ‘What is it that a customer is asking and how can we answer it?'”

Jimmy DeGroot is a jewelry store manager who has been in the business for over 20 years. Now he spends his time training teams around the world at jewelrystoretraining.com and sharing marketing advice through his blog site at jewelrymarketingguy.com. Sign up for training videos here.

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JimmyCast

Podcast: Get Your Employees to Act Like They Own the Damn Place

Or would you rather be their permanent baby-sitter?

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JIMMYCAST (EPISODE 2): GETTING EMPLOYEES TO ACT LIKE OWNERS (34:23 MINUTES)


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HOW CAN a jewelry-store owner get the members of his or her team to think and act like they are store-owners?

That’s the big question covered in the second episode of INSTORE’s new podcast series, JimmyCast, from jewelry-store trainer Jimmy DeGroot, along with co-host Doug Meadows of David Douglas Diamonds in Marietta, GA.

One of the main problems jewelers, and other business-owners have, is mustering the courage to empower their employees. DeGroot says many fear that if they train their employees to think like store-owners, they will eventually become store-owners … as your competition.

But is that possibility worse than having someone on your team you have to baby-sit as long as they work for you?

Meadows then explains his method for inspiring (notoriously resistant) millennial employees in his business. “Why do you always have to tell a millennial why?,” he asks. Meadows gives the example of a Chick-Fil-A manager, who instead of giving a young employee a broom and telling him or her to go out and sweep the parking lot, instead talks about the brand’s reputation for quality and how that extends through every stage of a customer interaction, from the moment they step into the parking lot until the moment they leave. Now having explained the purpose for sweeping the parking lot, he can end with a request instead of an order — “It would really help me out if you would take this broom and go out and take care of that,” the hypothetical store manager would say.

This process of providing a sense of mission is something that Meadows is working on at his own store — one he calls “how to share a why”. Meanwhile, Meadows is striving to speak even more fluently about the purpose and aspirations of his business — which he calls “what’s your why”. (For more reading on what makes “Why?” so important, try Simon Sinek’s business best-seller Start With Why.)

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If store-owners can’t delegate or teach staff, bad things happen. This could mean nobody in a store being able to sell a one-carat diamond without calling the owner, or, even worse, the owner ending up as permanent “watch-battery guy” for his or her store, handling lower-value responsibilities simply because no one else wants to do them.

“Are you the watch-battery guy at your store?” DeGroot asks.

“No!” says Meadows. “Well, occasionally,” he has to admit.

Part of the process of training staff to think like store-owners is setting up “non-negotiables” using a “nominal group process” as Brad Huisken refers to it. In this process, the owner sets a goal — for example, “creating an amazing customer experience” — and then asks employees to brainstorm ideas to achieve this goal. Later, they take the best of these ideas to establish key “non-negotiables” that must always be followed. While the owner’s input is important in this process, for the most part, it’s driven by employees. Since employees have created the rules themselves, they are better at policing each other for infractions against the rules.

This is important, says DeGroot, “because I knew that if I made the rules, then I was going to have to baby-sit the rules.”

If a store-owner can’t do this, and can’t give up some degree of control of the process, DeGroot and Meadows both agree, they may be better off down-sizing their business and becoming a sole proprietor, where he or she can do everything exactly the way they want to.

Which almost sounds worse than ending up as a “watch-battery guy”.

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Other episode highlights:

* Why DeGroot is not a fan of the interview question, “Where do you see yourself in five years?”
* The Christmas gift DeGroot would most like.
* The one jewelry-store job that DeGroot hates most.
* Meadows shares how he now ranks his daily to-do list by the profitability of individual actions.
* How a specific personality test, called a “Flagpage” (flagpage.com), can help you determine the best roles for every person in your store. The test, which costs $24.99, breaks a person’s personality characteristics down into four types — called “countries” — peace, perfect, fun and control. Each person can be a resident of a single country or multiple countries — i.e. “fun/peace country” or “perfect/control country”.

Watch the video version of the podcast below, or listen to the audio version at the top of the page. And, to receive future installments of JimmyCast and all other INSTORE podcasts, search for “INSTORE Podcasts” on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher or your favorite podcast platform.

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