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Zen Jeweler: Quantity Ain’t All It’s Cracked Up To Be

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Zen Jeweler


Fine jewelry requires a long-term attitude from its purchasers and wearers. This is bad news, and here’s why. Much of what we do today is for the short-term, the quick fix, the disposable society we’ve inherited from watching too many commercials. We’ve developed an addiction for the new, without an appreciation for the exceptional. We’ve begun to buy quantity. And we’ve begun to think of what we do in terms of that quantity. Quantity, frankly, ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. For instance, I once noted that in a store I was working in, 88 percent of the gross profit was coming from 15 percent of the store’s units. That meant that it took the other 85 percent of the stores sales to make up the last 12 percent of the gross profit. Quantity was defeating profitability. The 15 percent of units making up the vast majority of the store’s gross was, in fact, 135 units. Less than one sale a day. Imagine what just two sales a day like that would have done. Instead of one sale of $6,000, imagine two. Let’s continue to work harder, not smarter.

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When the Kids Have Their Own Careers, Wilkerson Can Help You to Retire

Alex and Gladys Rysman are the third generation to run Romm Jewelers in Brockton, Mass. And after many decades of service to the industry and their community, it was time to close the store and take advantage of some downtime. With three grown children who each had their own careers outside of the industry, they decided to call Wilkerson. Then, the Rysmans did what every jeweler should do: They called other retailers and asked about their own Wilkerson experience. “They all told us what a great experience it was and that’s what made us go with Wilkerson.” says Gladys Rysman. The results? Alex Rysman says he was impressed. “We exceeded whatever I expected to do by a large margin.”

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Zen Jeweler: Quantity Ain’t All It’s Cracked Up To Be

mm

Published

on

Zen Jeweler


Fine jewelry requires a long-term attitude from its purchasers and wearers. This is bad news, and here’s why. Much of what we do today is for the short-term, the quick fix, the disposable society we’ve inherited from watching too many commercials. We’ve developed an addiction for the new, without an appreciation for the exceptional. We’ve begun to buy quantity. And we’ve begun to think of what we do in terms of that quantity. Quantity, frankly, ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. For instance, I once noted that in a store I was working in, 88 percent of the gross profit was coming from 15 percent of the store’s units. That meant that it took the other 85 percent of the stores sales to make up the last 12 percent of the gross profit. Quantity was defeating profitability. The 15 percent of units making up the vast majority of the store’s gross was, in fact, 135 units. Less than one sale a day. Imagine what just two sales a day like that would have done. Instead of one sale of $6,000, imagine two. Let’s continue to work harder, not smarter.

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

When the Kids Have Their Own Careers, Wilkerson Can Help You to Retire

Alex and Gladys Rysman are the third generation to run Romm Jewelers in Brockton, Mass. And after many decades of service to the industry and their community, it was time to close the store and take advantage of some downtime. With three grown children who each had their own careers outside of the industry, they decided to call Wilkerson. Then, the Rysmans did what every jeweler should do: They called other retailers and asked about their own Wilkerson experience. “They all told us what a great experience it was and that’s what made us go with Wilkerson.” says Gladys Rysman. The results? Alex Rysman says he was impressed. “We exceeded whatever I expected to do by a large margin.”

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