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Renowned Retailers to Judge INSTORE Design Awards

Nine distinguished retailers form the panel.

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INSTORE ANNOUNCES THE JUDGES for its fourth annual design competition, the INSTORE Design Awards, which is accepting entries through February 22. Nine top retailers comprise the panel, which will determine 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each contest category (the contest will also have an online voting component wherein all retailers will be invited to cast their votes for Retailer’s Choice in each category).

The judges are:

Patricia Faber
Co-owner, Aaron Faber, New York

Patricia and her husband, Edward, co-own Aaron Faber, which was founded in 1974 and resides on Fifth Avenue in New York. The store is dedicated to the presentation of contemporary studio jewelry, boasting nearly 50 designer collections. Patricia is a graduate gemologist and a frequent lecturer in the field of studio jewelry.

Elizabeth Gibson
Owner, Eliza Page, Austin, TX

Elizabeth founded Eliza Page in 2004 to showcase select independent jewelry artists based in Austin and around the world. Now with two locations, Eliza Page has been featured in various industry publications including INSTORE. Elizabeth is also the president of the Austin chapter of the Women’s Jewelry Association.

Lindy Kavanaugh
Owner, Lindy’s Jewelry, Fernandina Beach, FL

Lindy, a graduate gemologist, opened Lindy’s Jewelry in 2001 in her hometown: Fernandina Beach in the greater Jacksonville area. The store moved into a new downtown building in 2016, adding about a dozen designer lines.

Lauren Kulchinsky Levison
Chief Style Officer, Mayfair Rocks, East Hampton, NY

Lauren represents the fourth generation at Mayfair Rocks alongside her brother Justin Kulchinsky. The store delivers a high-end client experience while representing nearly 40 jewelry designer collections. Lauren was inducted into the NATIONAL JEWELER Hall of Fame in 2002.

Marcus Majors
Owner, Sam L. Majors, Midland, TX

Marcus represents the fifth generation of Majors at Sam L. Majors and is a certified gemologist through AGS. Founded in 1898 by J.P. Majors, Sam L. Majors has been an authorized dealer for many high-end luxury jewelry and watch lines for over 40 years.

Sia Maravelias
Director, Quadrum Gallery, Chestnut Hill, MA

Sia considers her life “one big treasure hunt” as she is constantly seeking new jewelry artists to present to her clients at Quadrum, which is celebrating 40 years in business in the greater Boston area under owner Cynthia Kagan. Nearly 40 designer collections are currently on display in the gallery.

Orin and Tina Mazzoni
Owners, Orin Jewelers, Detroit

Orin and Tina represent the second generation of Orin Jewelers, which celebrates its 86th year in business this year. Orin is a graduate gemologist and a certified gemologist appraiser; he took over from his father as president and CEO in 1969. The store numbers nearly two dozen designer lines in its showcases.

Matthew Rosenheim
President, Tiny Jewel Box, Washington, DC

Matthew oversees the day-to-day operations of Tiny Jewel Box, named America’s Coolest Store in the Big Cool category in 2011. Matthew is the third generation of the Rosenheim family at Tiny Jewel Box, having joined the company in 1993. A graduate gemologist, Matthew is a founding member and serves on the Executive Board for Gen-Next Jewelers, serves on the Advisory Board of the Jewelry Information Center and is a member of the Young Presidents Organization.

Laurie Watt
Co-owner, EAT Gallery, Maysville, KY

Located in historic downtown Maysville, KY, EAT Gallery offers one-of-a-kind local art and breathtaking natural treasures from around the world, including many independent jewelry designer collections. The gallery launched in 2006.

These judges will choose winners in each of the following categories of jewelry: gold, platinum, silver, colored gemstones, diamonds, colored diamonds, alternative materials, pearls, men’s jewelry and engagement/wedding rings, as well as best bracelet, best earring, best necklace, best ring and best statement piece.

Additionally, all entries will be included in a Voting Guide shipped with the April issue of INSTORE, as well as displayed online at instoremag.com where jewelry retailers will be invited to vote and choose a “Retailer’s Choice” award in each category.

Winners will be featured in the June issue of INSTORE, which is distributed at JCK and Couture in Las Vegas, as well as online at instoremag.com. Each winner will also receive a trophy commemorating their achievement. The grand prize winner will be featured on the front cover of the June issue.

Designers may enter at instoremag.com/awards.

Trace Shelton is the editor-in-chief of INSTORE magazine. He can be reached at trace@smartworkmedia.com.

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Power-Cutting Burglars Target Jewelry Stores in Northeast

The trend has spread to New Jersey and Connecticut.

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The Jewelers’ Security Alliance reports that power-cutting thieves have been targeting jewelry stores in the Northeast.

The latest incidents took place in New Jersey and Connecticut. The pattern has played out in many states, with burglars cutting jewelry stores’ power lines in order to disable alarm systems, but previously had occurred mainly in the West, Midwest and South.

These are the incidents the JSA reported in a bulletin to retailers:

Morris Plains, NJ, July 27

At 6:45 p.m. on a Sunday evening two males and one female cut the power to a retail jewelry store, but police reported they left without trying to get inside the store. The same gang was reported to have done the same thing at jewelry stores in Sparta, NJ, on July 26, 2019, and in Bedminster, NJ.

Darien, CT, Aug. 8

At 11:20 p.m. suspects turned the power off at a downtown jewelry store at the outside electrical box. The power interruption tripped the burglar alarm, and the suspects waited for the police response. On Saturday, August 10, the same suspects returned at 6:20 p.m. and again turned the power off. It is believed that the suspects again waited to observe police response, and to wait for the back-up battery to be exhausted. However, no entry was made to the store. 

Fairfield, CT, Aug. 11

Between 3:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m. on Sunday, August 11, a retail jeweler received a call from his alarm company regarding the loss of power to his store. The jeweler discovered the electrical meter cover had been pried off the box. The police responded and no suspects were observed.

JSA reported in June that it was aware of over 50 cases in which burglars had cut power lines.

The burglars cut the power lines soon after a store has closed for the night, then wait nearby to see the response by the owner or police, according to JSA.

The burglars have not carried out safe burglaries at all of the stores.

 

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Tiffany Rolls Out Men’s Jewelry Collection

The line is ‘centered on craftsmanship as the foundation of our company.’

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Tiffany & Co. announced the launch of its Tiffany Men’s collections, including jewelry, watches and home and accessories products.

Tiffany Men’s includes two collections: Tiffany 1837 Makers and Diamond Point.

These pieces are from the Tiffany & Co.’s men’s collection. Photo: Roe Etheridge

“Tiffany Men’s is centered on craftsmanship as the foundation of our company,” said Reed Krakoff, chief artistic officer for Tiffany. “Tiffany 1837 Makers is a nod to the workmanship and time-honored techniques used in creating jewelry — the idea that there’s a person behind each object.”

According to a press release:

Embodying Tiffany’s craftsmanship heritage, the Tiffany 1837 Makers collection is inspired by the jeweler’s hollowware workshop and its tradition of handcrafting sports trophies. Designers experimented with concave and convex forms, flat edges and motifs evocative of utilitarian hardware when creating jewelry, barware and more. Stamped with symbols like “T & CO MAKERS,” “NY” and “AG925,” Tiffany 1837 Makers honors Tiffany’s silversmithing legacy and the fact that the luxury house set the U.S. standard for sterling silver (925 per 1,000 parts silver). The made-to-order Tiffany 1837 Makers trophy ring honors Tiffany’s 160-history of making sports trophies by hand and makes a bold statement and adds edge to any outfit.

Diamond Point, on the other hand, “represents the elevated, classic end of the style spectrum with a strong, graphic pattern.”

The company states:

This motif appears as a subtle accent or a prominent overlay on jewelry and Home & Accessories pieces like the Diamond Point rectangle pendant in sterling silver, cuff in sterling silver and cocktail mixer in lead crystal and sterling silver. Most of the Diamond Point jewelry designs are die struck and hand polished to achieve the distinctive textured motif.

Diamond Point takes a more modern and graphic approach, utilizing a pattern inspired by a diamond’s culet that ties back to our diamond authority.

The New York Post reports that the launch is “part of the Tiffany’s strategy to attract younger shoppers and pump up sales.”

In all, Tiffany Men’s includes about 100 pieces. Jewelry rices range from $200 to $15,000.

Among the accessories items on offer are ice tongs and cocktail shakers.

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Jeweler Sentenced for Theft, Ordered to Pay $85,000 in Restitution

He’ll have to serve 4 years of probation.

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A Colorado jeweler who was accused with stealing gold, jewelry and money from customers has been ordered to pay restitution and serve a probationary sentence.

David Kushnir, who operated D & D Jewelers in Thornton, pleaded guilty to theft, KMGH-TV reports. He was accused of stealing from nine customers, according to the news outlet.

The court ordered Kushnir to pay about $85,000 in restitution and serve four years of economic crime supervised probation.

In January, authorities accused Kushnir of defrauding customers after they brought their diamonds, watches and other jewelry to him for repair or consignment sale at his business. It was also alleged that he sold fake diamonds to three victims.

The Sentinel newspaper reported in January that in one case, he was accused of removing a movement piece worth $40,000 from a Rolex watch he was asked to repair and then substituting “a Chinese piece.”

Read more at KMGH-TV

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