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Selling Design: Jan Brassem

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Sales advice for designer jewelry.

[h3]Jan Brassem[/h3]
Managing Director, Brassem Global Consulting

[dropcap cap=CONSUMERS]of designer jewelry fall into two basic categories: Ones who seek your input, and those who want to be left alone. Ultimately, both
will either come to you for information or meet you at the checkout counter.[/dropcap]

My first rule when selling the well-heeled customer who wants to be left alone is “less is more.” Chances are, she knows her styling likes and dislikes. The salesperson doesn’t need to use much selling or coaching — a little goes a long way. As a matter of fact, a conscientious salesperson can be irritating — in the customer’s eyes, anyway — making the sale that much more diffi cult. Don’t be considered pushy.

So here’s what I do. I pretend I’m busy doing something else, (i.e., dusting, arranging, doing paperwork, you get the idea). I am never more than 20 feet away. If the customer is at all interested in a style, you’re ready to help. But, remember, she has to ask the question before you initiate a conversation.

This brings us to the second rule. When selling the wealthier jewelry customer, personal style appeal always trumps salesmanship. If a particular ring or bracelet is
what the customer likes, very little selling is needed, except when a question needs answering.

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But, when the customer seems lost by all your designs, it is up to you to take the bull by the horns and probe — question — to fi nd out likes, dislikes, budgets,
personality and anything else that will close the deal. Lead her to a style that you think would fi t her personality and budget. If she turns that down, start over and probe some more. While you’re at it, develop a relationship with her. She could end up being a customer for life.

The upscale luxury customer, whether the quiet type or the curious browser, will demand high quality and excellent service. Be sure to be able describe, in detail, diamond quality, craftsmanship, colored stone coordination, manufacturer, country of origin and the like.

[span class=note]This story is from the July-August 2011 edition of INDESIGN[/span]

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Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

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Selling Design: Jan Brassem

mm

Published

on

Sales advice for designer jewelry.

[h3]Jan Brassem[/h3]
Managing Director, Brassem Global Consulting

[dropcap cap=CONSUMERS]of designer jewelry fall into two basic categories: Ones who seek your input, and those who want to be left alone. Ultimately, both
will either come to you for information or meet you at the checkout counter.[/dropcap]

My first rule when selling the well-heeled customer who wants to be left alone is “less is more.” Chances are, she knows her styling likes and dislikes. The salesperson doesn’t need to use much selling or coaching — a little goes a long way. As a matter of fact, a conscientious salesperson can be irritating — in the customer’s eyes, anyway — making the sale that much more diffi cult. Don’t be considered pushy.

So here’s what I do. I pretend I’m busy doing something else, (i.e., dusting, arranging, doing paperwork, you get the idea). I am never more than 20 feet away. If the customer is at all interested in a style, you’re ready to help. But, remember, she has to ask the question before you initiate a conversation.

Advertisement

This brings us to the second rule. When selling the wealthier jewelry customer, personal style appeal always trumps salesmanship. If a particular ring or bracelet is
what the customer likes, very little selling is needed, except when a question needs answering.

But, when the customer seems lost by all your designs, it is up to you to take the bull by the horns and probe — question — to fi nd out likes, dislikes, budgets,
personality and anything else that will close the deal. Lead her to a style that you think would fi t her personality and budget. If she turns that down, start over and probe some more. While you’re at it, develop a relationship with her. She could end up being a customer for life.

The upscale luxury customer, whether the quiet type or the curious browser, will demand high quality and excellent service. Be sure to be able describe, in detail, diamond quality, craftsmanship, colored stone coordination, manufacturer, country of origin and the like.

[span class=note]This story is from the July-August 2011 edition of INDESIGN[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

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Most Popular