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Selling Design: Rick Segel

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Selling Design: Rick Segal

BY INDESIGN TEAM

Selling Design: Rick Segel

Published in the July-August2012 issue

Many of us make the assumption that a well-dressed and well-cared-for person has more financial strength than the person wearing dirty jeans, a T-shirt, or unkempt hair. We also tend to judge people by the car they drive. Someone who is driving a late model Cadillac, Mercedes or Lexus is believed to have more money than someone who is driving a 10-year-old Buick. However, this is not always the case anymore.

We are living in the age of “stealth wealth.” Do we have to look any further than Steve Jobs as the perfect example of the type of behavior that downplays the importance of materialistic adornments? The real problem is that rich people just don’t look like rich people anymore — or perhaps they do. When people are comfortable in their skin and know what is important to them, they don’t need the impressions that appearances can create.

On the other hand, we know that many people love to collect the trappings of a successful life. Think about the 30-something who leases the premium auto because it makes him feel good … or the woman who is constantly trading up her diamond for the personal high it gives her … or the couple who stretches to get that bigger home, just because they want it.

Let’s not judge people by what is important to them; let’s learn to appreciate that every person has the potential to become our best customers. That person wearing the dirty jeans deserves the respect that your business has to offer, the same respect that Richard Gere had to insist upon in the movie Pretty Woman when Julia Roberts went into a high-end store and was ignored.

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The bottom line is this: Who gives us the right to decide who our customer will be? We win some, we lose some, but we dress for them all.

Rick Segel, retail trainer and best-selling author

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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Selling Design: Rick Segel

mm

Published

on

Selling Design: Rick Segal

BY INDESIGN TEAM

Selling Design: Rick Segel

Published in the July-August2012 issue

Many of us make the assumption that a well-dressed and well-cared-for person has more financial strength than the person wearing dirty jeans, a T-shirt, or unkempt hair. We also tend to judge people by the car they drive. Someone who is driving a late model Cadillac, Mercedes or Lexus is believed to have more money than someone who is driving a 10-year-old Buick. However, this is not always the case anymore.

We are living in the age of “stealth wealth.” Do we have to look any further than Steve Jobs as the perfect example of the type of behavior that downplays the importance of materialistic adornments? The real problem is that rich people just don’t look like rich people anymore — or perhaps they do. When people are comfortable in their skin and know what is important to them, they don’t need the impressions that appearances can create.

On the other hand, we know that many people love to collect the trappings of a successful life. Think about the 30-something who leases the premium auto because it makes him feel good … or the woman who is constantly trading up her diamond for the personal high it gives her … or the couple who stretches to get that bigger home, just because they want it.

Advertisement

Let’s not judge people by what is important to them; let’s learn to appreciate that every person has the potential to become our best customers. That person wearing the dirty jeans deserves the respect that your business has to offer, the same respect that Richard Gere had to insist upon in the movie Pretty Woman when Julia Roberts went into a high-end store and was ignored.

The bottom line is this: Who gives us the right to decide who our customer will be? We win some, we lose some, but we dress for them all.

Rick Segel, retail trainer and best-selling author

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular