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Shane Decker: Go Ahead, Interrupt Me

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Here’s a sales technique that could sell you hundreds more diamonds.

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Go Ahead, Interrupt Me

This month, I’m going to explain a technique I’ve used to sell hundreds of diamonds to customers who didn’t come in looking for one. It’s called the Interruption Technique. Its goal is to raise your client’s curiosity, and it takes the right kind of enthusiasm, combined with awesome teamwork, to make it work. 

Now, let me start by saying this: You never interrupt a salesperson in the middle of his presentation, or at the beginning, or at the end when he’s ready to close. In fact, you never interrupt him at all. “Then why in the world do you call it the ‘interruption’ technique?” I’m glad you asked!

Now, you’ve piqued the client’s curiosity. It works like this. When you and your client are finished, there is a time when you’re just having small talk — chatting about skiing, grandkids, vacation plans, whatever. Every presentation has that moment.

Right before the client is ready to leave, you have another sales associate (someone you work very well with) pull a loose diamond that’s more than a carat in size.

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Your associate should put it into a four-prong, 2-inch, spring-loaded diamond holder. She then wraps the holder and the diamond in new diamond paper. Your teammate walks over to you with the wrapped diamond, and, speaking quietly to you, but loud enough for the client to hear, says: “I know he’d love to see what’s in here.” Then, she walks away.

Now, you’ve piqued the client’s curiosity. Your teammate handed you the diamond in the paper so you don’t have to walk away and find tweezers (every time you walk away, it’s a sales killer). The client is wondering, “What is in the paper?”

He was getting ready to leave, but now he’s decided, “I’m not going anywhere.” Most people have never held a diamond over a carat. Sure, they may have held a diamond, but not a loose one over a carat.

As you are opening the diamond paper and handing him the diamond in the holder (which is far less intimidating than holding it in tweezers), turn the diamond ever so slowly so he can see the flash and fire coming out of it. Say something like:

— “This was cut by somebody with hands as skilled as a surgeon.”
— “Diamonds display nature’s love affair with light.”
— “Diamonds have been designed to inhale light and breathe fire.”

In other words, say something cool. Don’t say “It sparkles” or “This is a nice stone.” Your customer will grab it and say, “Wow.” He’ll pause, and you pause with him. Don’t say a word, just let him get caught up in the moment.

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Maybe your customer came in for a repair, a battery, or something special, but now he’s having fun. You’ve just started a new presentation. Maybe your customer came in for a repair, a battery, or something special, but now he’s having fun. When people have fun, they buy.

You’ve just showed him something that’s normally locked up. Something you’re trusting him with, something extremely valuable. And, you gave him a silent compliment: You believed he could afford it.

He might buy it … you never know. Remember this: The person you don’t show is the one who might have bought it. And even if he doesn’t, you’ll get an incredible referral! is.

Shane Decker has provided sales training for more than 3,000 stores worldwide. Contact him at (317) 535-8676 or at ex-sell-ence.com.

This story is from the February 2010 edition of INSTORE.

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Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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Shane Decker

Shane Decker: Go Ahead, Interrupt Me

mm

Published

on

Here’s a sales technique that could sell you hundreds more diamonds.

{loadposition shanedeckerheader}

Go Ahead, Interrupt Me

This month, I’m going to explain a technique I’ve used to sell hundreds of diamonds to customers who didn’t come in looking for one. It’s called the Interruption Technique. Its goal is to raise your client’s curiosity, and it takes the right kind of enthusiasm, combined with awesome teamwork, to make it work. 

Now, let me start by saying this: You never interrupt a salesperson in the middle of his presentation, or at the beginning, or at the end when he’s ready to close. In fact, you never interrupt him at all. “Then why in the world do you call it the ‘interruption’ technique?” I’m glad you asked!

Now, you’ve piqued the client’s curiosity. It works like this. When you and your client are finished, there is a time when you’re just having small talk — chatting about skiing, grandkids, vacation plans, whatever. Every presentation has that moment.

Advertisement

Right before the client is ready to leave, you have another sales associate (someone you work very well with) pull a loose diamond that’s more than a carat in size.

Your associate should put it into a four-prong, 2-inch, spring-loaded diamond holder. She then wraps the holder and the diamond in new diamond paper. Your teammate walks over to you with the wrapped diamond, and, speaking quietly to you, but loud enough for the client to hear, says: “I know he’d love to see what’s in here.” Then, she walks away.

Now, you’ve piqued the client’s curiosity. Your teammate handed you the diamond in the paper so you don’t have to walk away and find tweezers (every time you walk away, it’s a sales killer). The client is wondering, “What is in the paper?”

He was getting ready to leave, but now he’s decided, “I’m not going anywhere.” Most people have never held a diamond over a carat. Sure, they may have held a diamond, but not a loose one over a carat.

As you are opening the diamond paper and handing him the diamond in the holder (which is far less intimidating than holding it in tweezers), turn the diamond ever so slowly so he can see the flash and fire coming out of it. Say something like:

— “This was cut by somebody with hands as skilled as a surgeon.”
— “Diamonds display nature’s love affair with light.”
— “Diamonds have been designed to inhale light and breathe fire.”

Advertisement

In other words, say something cool. Don’t say “It sparkles” or “This is a nice stone.” Your customer will grab it and say, “Wow.” He’ll pause, and you pause with him. Don’t say a word, just let him get caught up in the moment.

Maybe your customer came in for a repair, a battery, or something special, but now he’s having fun. You’ve just started a new presentation. Maybe your customer came in for a repair, a battery, or something special, but now he’s having fun. When people have fun, they buy.

You’ve just showed him something that’s normally locked up. Something you’re trusting him with, something extremely valuable. And, you gave him a silent compliment: You believed he could afford it.

He might buy it … you never know. Remember this: The person you don’t show is the one who might have bought it. And even if he doesn’t, you’ll get an incredible referral! is.

Shane Decker has provided sales training for more than 3,000 stores worldwide. Contact him at (317) 535-8676 or at ex-sell-ence.com.

This story is from the February 2010 edition of INSTORE.

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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