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Smart Managers: Patrick Giarelli

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Snowden’s Jewelers, Wilmington, NC

 Smart Managers: Patrick Giarelli

[dropcap cap=P]atrick Giarelli, general manager of Snowden’s Jewelers in Wilmington, NC, was suggested as a Smart Manager by owner Chris Snowden. “He has been with me two years,” Snowden says. “We have seen double-digit growth both years. He is a true motivator.” Most notable is his energy level. “I get tired watching him,” Snowden admits. Giarelli says the energy comes from enthusiasm for his job combined with motivational materials, morning workouts and a love of life. “Everybody has asked me, ‘Do you drink coffee?’ And I don’t. I’m addicted to being alive and having fun.” — Eileen McClelland[/dropcap]

THE BAD GUY: If you’re in management, you’ve got to be the one who stays the course. If not, none of the standards will matter. Somebody’s got to be the bad guy. 

CORE VALUES: There’s one thing I can’t teach — intrinsic motivation. It’s the most important characteristic of a good salesperson.

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VIRAL LEADERSHIP: It’s up to me to drive myself. If the leadership is driven and is passionate, that should lend itself to the staff. Hopefully it becomes contagious.

SELL-EBRATE: If you sold a $100 item, you’ll get a ‘Good job!’ For a $1,000 item, a high-five. For a $10,000 sale, I’ll offer to rub your back or make up a song. If you keep celebrating, you’ll keep having success.

CARROTS: We do have a lot of side contests, little rewards, usually bi-monthly, like who can do the most add-ons, who’s got the most sales over a three-day period, who can sell the most of our watch line in a month.

PRIORITIES: If I weren’t in jewelry, I would be a motivational speaker. That or an announcer for ESPN. My priorities are my wife, jewelry, sports, in that order.

TIME OFF: I make the schedule and (staff) are going to get what they believe they need 90 percent of the time because happy people sell better.

POWER OF FUN: I do the darndest things. I might jump up in the air, do high fives. It makes it fun and fun makes you want to come back to work.

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EXECUTION: This is not rocket science. But it is a consistent execution of the basics.

[contentheading]10 STEPS[/contentheading]

“There are 10 steps that I follow in the sales process,” Giarelli says. “If you follow these steps over and over and over, you will do nothing but grow.”

1 Have a positive attitude. It’s your time to shine, to be romantic and inspirational.

2 Greet the client within 10 seconds. Offer a smile with eye contact.

3 Offer to clean their jewelry. It makes them so happy they are predetermined to say “Yes, I’ll take that!”

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4 Establish a relationship. Establish a rapport.

5 Work out why they are here. Ask open-ended, probing questions, like “What does the gift need to say?”

As you’re taking merchandise out of the case, notice the details that’ll help you sell it. Note the caratage and cost, so you’ll be prepared to answer questions.

7 Overcome objections.

8 Go for the close every time regardless.

9 Go for an add-on.

10 Cement the sale. Within a week to 10 days, write a thank-you card and invite them back in.

[span class=note]This story is from the April 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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Smart Managers: Patrick Giarelli

mm

Published

on

Snowden’s Jewelers, Wilmington, NC

 Smart Managers: Patrick Giarelli

[dropcap cap=P]atrick Giarelli, general manager of Snowden’s Jewelers in Wilmington, NC, was suggested as a Smart Manager by owner Chris Snowden. “He has been with me two years,” Snowden says. “We have seen double-digit growth both years. He is a true motivator.” Most notable is his energy level. “I get tired watching him,” Snowden admits. Giarelli says the energy comes from enthusiasm for his job combined with motivational materials, morning workouts and a love of life. “Everybody has asked me, ‘Do you drink coffee?’ And I don’t. I’m addicted to being alive and having fun.” — Eileen McClelland[/dropcap]

THE BAD GUY: If you’re in management, you’ve got to be the one who stays the course. If not, none of the standards will matter. Somebody’s got to be the bad guy. 

Advertisement

CORE VALUES: There’s one thing I can’t teach — intrinsic motivation. It’s the most important characteristic of a good salesperson.

VIRAL LEADERSHIP: It’s up to me to drive myself. If the leadership is driven and is passionate, that should lend itself to the staff. Hopefully it becomes contagious.

SELL-EBRATE: If you sold a $100 item, you’ll get a ‘Good job!’ For a $1,000 item, a high-five. For a $10,000 sale, I’ll offer to rub your back or make up a song. If you keep celebrating, you’ll keep having success.

CARROTS: We do have a lot of side contests, little rewards, usually bi-monthly, like who can do the most add-ons, who’s got the most sales over a three-day period, who can sell the most of our watch line in a month.

PRIORITIES: If I weren’t in jewelry, I would be a motivational speaker. That or an announcer for ESPN. My priorities are my wife, jewelry, sports, in that order.

TIME OFF: I make the schedule and (staff) are going to get what they believe they need 90 percent of the time because happy people sell better.

Advertisement

POWER OF FUN: I do the darndest things. I might jump up in the air, do high fives. It makes it fun and fun makes you want to come back to work.

EXECUTION: This is not rocket science. But it is a consistent execution of the basics.

[contentheading]10 STEPS[/contentheading]

“There are 10 steps that I follow in the sales process,” Giarelli says. “If you follow these steps over and over and over, you will do nothing but grow.”

1 Have a positive attitude. It’s your time to shine, to be romantic and inspirational.

2 Greet the client within 10 seconds. Offer a smile with eye contact.

Advertisement

3 Offer to clean their jewelry. It makes them so happy they are predetermined to say “Yes, I’ll take that!”

4 Establish a relationship. Establish a rapport.

5 Work out why they are here. Ask open-ended, probing questions, like “What does the gift need to say?”

As you’re taking merchandise out of the case, notice the details that’ll help you sell it. Note the caratage and cost, so you’ll be prepared to answer questions.

7 Overcome objections.

8 Go for the close every time regardless.

9 Go for an add-on.

10 Cement the sale. Within a week to 10 days, write a thank-you card and invite them back in.

[span class=note]This story is from the April 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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