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Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio

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Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio 

BY EILEEN MCCLELLAND

Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio

Published in the June 2012 issue

STORE NAME: Thom Duma Fine Jewelers
LOCATION: Warren, OH

Diana Galterio, 49, wrote $1 million in sales in 2011, for the first time in her 25 year-long career. She had been working less than two years at Thom Duma after coming from a chain store. She did it working just 34 hours a week and despite a huge personal loss. Although Galterio is highly self-motivated, she attributes her success to a supportive work environment. “It was the most challenging year of my life. I lost my mom last year, but when she was sick, I needed to come to work, to refocus.”

  • If a customer says they’re just looking, I just talk to them about the weather or something that’s going on, to break the ice. I don’t believe you should ever leave your customer, but I might back off a little.
  • When I greet a customer, I say, ‘Hi, welcome to Thom Duma’s. Have you ever been in our store? If they say no, I welcome them, shake their hand, tell them my name. I see what they’re here for and show them around. If Tom’s here, I always try to introduce them because it’s not that common for an owner to be in a store.
  • When a customer first comes in, I try to spend 10 minutes getting to know them. My specialty is bridal, so I want to build trust. They might be back two or three times. They love it that I remember everything they say. Then I follow up for anniversaries and birthdays.
  • When girls come in together or a mother and daughter come in to look at rings, I never think it’s a waste of time. I spend just as much time with them, and the guy does call me and come in. I’ll write down everything she looks at, and put a star next to what she really liked. And then it’s a done deal and it makes it easy for him.
  • We have a good work environment and an amazing staff. Our sales manager, Jeff, is so calm that nothing seems to rattle him. If I need him, he can tell just by the look on my face.
  • My biggest sale was in October. It was $55,000, an upgrade to a 3-carat diamond. There was no occasion. She wanted a bigger stone.
  • I ask for the sale as many times as I have to without making the customer feel overwhelmed. Because if they are in a jewelry store, they want something. If it’s not going to happen now, I’ll follow up in six months.
  • I have to have my lucky loupe on my keys. I don’t like to use anyone else’s keys.
  • You have to be patient. You have to be a good listener. That’s the key.

 

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

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Smooth Sellers

Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio

Published

on

Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio 

BY EILEEN MCCLELLAND

Smooth Sellers: Diana Galterio

Published in the June 2012 issue

STORE NAME: Thom Duma Fine Jewelers
LOCATION: Warren, OH

Diana Galterio, 49, wrote $1 million in sales in 2011, for the first time in her 25 year-long career. She had been working less than two years at Thom Duma after coming from a chain store. She did it working just 34 hours a week and despite a huge personal loss. Although Galterio is highly self-motivated, she attributes her success to a supportive work environment. “It was the most challenging year of my life. I lost my mom last year, but when she was sick, I needed to come to work, to refocus.”

  • If a customer says they’re just looking, I just talk to them about the weather or something that’s going on, to break the ice. I don’t believe you should ever leave your customer, but I might back off a little.
  • When I greet a customer, I say, ‘Hi, welcome to Thom Duma’s. Have you ever been in our store? If they say no, I welcome them, shake their hand, tell them my name. I see what they’re here for and show them around. If Tom’s here, I always try to introduce them because it’s not that common for an owner to be in a store.
  • When a customer first comes in, I try to spend 10 minutes getting to know them. My specialty is bridal, so I want to build trust. They might be back two or three times. They love it that I remember everything they say. Then I follow up for anniversaries and birthdays.
  • When girls come in together or a mother and daughter come in to look at rings, I never think it’s a waste of time. I spend just as much time with them, and the guy does call me and come in. I’ll write down everything she looks at, and put a star next to what she really liked. And then it’s a done deal and it makes it easy for him.
  • We have a good work environment and an amazing staff. Our sales manager, Jeff, is so calm that nothing seems to rattle him. If I need him, he can tell just by the look on my face.
  • My biggest sale was in October. It was $55,000, an upgrade to a 3-carat diamond. There was no occasion. She wanted a bigger stone.
  • I ask for the sale as many times as I have to without making the customer feel overwhelmed. Because if they are in a jewelry store, they want something. If it’s not going to happen now, I’ll follow up in six months.
  • I have to have my lucky loupe on my keys. I don’t like to use anyone else’s keys.
  • You have to be patient. You have to be a good listener. That’s the key.

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

Promoted Headlines

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