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Tale End: Trend Setter

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Tale End: Trend Setter[dropcap cap=A]s we were dressing for a black-tie charity event one evening, we couldn’t find my husband’s bow tie. Crisis! Feeling creative, and struggling with his collar (and bad temper), I managed to substitute one of our pins — matte onyx and gold — instead. He grumbled, but finally wore it, and even enjoyed it. (“Told you so!”)[/dropcap]

Then I decided to perform a public service for America and start a trend to liberate all the beleaguered males from the horrors of the bow tie: I moved a number of our more geometric, understated, slow-moving ladies’ pins to the men’s case. They looked good there.

Sure enough, when the wife of one of our clients, a theater director, came in to buy him an anniversary gift, what do you think I immediately suggested? Yes, and she did buy him a nice fan-shaped onyx pin.

What I didn’t know at the time was that he had just won a Tony award, and soon enough, I had the pleasure of cutting out from my newspaper the picture of award-winning director Robert Hall’s nomination. Fastened to the collar of his dress shirt was a fan-shaped pin — my pin! I started a trend!

[h4]Eve J. Alfillé[/h4]
Eve J. Alfillé Gallery and Studio, Evanston, IL

Tale End: Trend Setter

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[span class=note]This story is from the December 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

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Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

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In the End

Tale End: Trend Setter

Published

on

Tale End: Trend Setter[dropcap cap=A]s we were dressing for a black-tie charity event one evening, we couldn’t find my husband’s bow tie. Crisis! Feeling creative, and struggling with his collar (and bad temper), I managed to substitute one of our pins — matte onyx and gold — instead. He grumbled, but finally wore it, and even enjoyed it. (“Told you so!”)[/dropcap]

Then I decided to perform a public service for America and start a trend to liberate all the beleaguered males from the horrors of the bow tie: I moved a number of our more geometric, understated, slow-moving ladies’ pins to the men’s case. They looked good there.

Sure enough, when the wife of one of our clients, a theater director, came in to buy him an anniversary gift, what do you think I immediately suggested? Yes, and she did buy him a nice fan-shaped onyx pin.

What I didn’t know at the time was that he had just won a Tony award, and soon enough, I had the pleasure of cutting out from my newspaper the picture of award-winning director Robert Hall’s nomination. Fastened to the collar of his dress shirt was a fan-shaped pin — my pin! I started a trend!

[h4]Eve J. Alfillé[/h4]
Eve J. Alfillé Gallery and Studio, Evanston, IL

Advertisement

Tale End: Trend Setter

[span class=note]This story is from the December 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Thinking of Liquidating? Think: Wilkerson

When Peter Reines, owner of Reines Jewelers in Charlottesville, VA, decided it was time to turn over the “reins” of his 45-year-old business to Jessica and Kevin Rogers, he chose Wilkerson to run his liquidation sale. It was, he says, the best way to maximize the return on his decades-long investment in fine jewelry. Now, with new owners at the helm, Reines can relax knowing that the sale was a success, and his new life is financially secure. And he’s glad he partnered with Wilkerson for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “There’s just no way one person or company could run a sale the way we did,” he says.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular