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What I’ve Learned

Retailers, jewelry makers and even a consultant or two sound off on what they know about wedding jewelry

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We asked a sampling of notable jewelry retailers, designers, manufacturers and consultants to talk about the most important things they’ve learned about the art and science of making and selling engagement rings. Respondents shared everything from practical tips to the emotional high they get from participating in these momentous celebrations of love.

Women are the Drivers

Noam Carver, Noam Carver Designer

  • Women are in the driver’s seat. There was a time when a guy would surprise his bride with an engagement ring. Today, women are active in the process of choosing their ring, sharing images, shopping together and informing their close friends or family of the styles they favor. 
  • Biggest challenge? Getting stores out of their comfort zone, getting them to try new brands and introduce new collections. Retailers can get attached to lines that are not performing out of fear of losing that initial investment, but they are missing out on new collections that can bring revenue growth and new clientele. 
  • Dainty bands, solitaires and intricate setting styles are trending now; demand for halos is declining. Rose gold is very strong and we’re starting to see an uptick in yellow gold; white is still No. 1.
  • What I like about being in this business is: It’s a beautiful harmony of design, fashion, marketing and strategy. Keeps you on your toes and is continuously stimulating. Forging relationships with storeowners, sales staff and consumers brings meaning to all the hard work.

Millennials Get A Bad Rap

Marc Adwar, Brooklyn Jewelers

  • For our new bridal line, we’re trying to target millennials. We take a traditional style and add a little Brooklyn edginess. We built Brooklyn Jewelers in the heart of Williamsburg to be surrounded by millennials. They get a bad rap. They’re misunderstood.
  • I think everyone is wrong about the future of retail. I don’t think everyone is going to be sitting in their houses ordering from Amazon and taking Ubers everywhere. Stores need to change the experience, and if they’re willing to change the experience, they are going to do very well. Everyone has discounted the relationships these retailers have made with their communities over the years. But if those stores aren’t willing to change, then they are going to have a very hard time.
  • When I was a young kid and Dad used to send me on the road, customers would pick out dozens of different styles. And nowadays, stores have much less inventory and everything is more custom-based. Even if a retailer has 5,000 rings, people will want the 5,001st ring. We built our systems for us to be able to build the CAD designs and make alterations for the customer with anticipation that that was going to be happening in the future.
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Make a Personal Connection

Erica Tague, Michael & Sons, Reno, NV

  • I have learned to ask about her. What is she interested in, what does she do for work, how did they meet? Making a personal connection with the person shopping for the engagement ring makes it more than a sale to them. They feel that they have a friend and not just someone trying to sell them something. 
  • I have learned to talk less and listen more. This is difficult because I am Italian and I love to talk, but I have found that if you ask a question, pause and hear their response; then they feel that they are driving the bus.

Show Them Three Diamonds

Alan Perry, Perry’s Emporium, Wilmington, NC

  • Show the customers three loose diamonds and let them pick the one they like best. I learned the three-diamond approach from someone on Polygon many years ago. The nerdy type guys came in saying 54 percent table, 60 percent depth, VVS1, D color, etc. So now I order three diamonds with different colors and cuts and clarity within a certain price range and at least one with a little spread on the table and one triple-X cut and then put them out there, ask him which one is the table and depth you want? Which one is the clarity you want? He always picks wrong … and then I teach him it’s in the eye of the beloved one. Most times, he picks the diamond that’s a lower cut and clarity and a lower price. He usually buys the one I pick for him, because he thinks it’s the most brilliant one of the three!

Let Shoppers Dream the Dream

Jo Goralski, The Jewelry Mechanic, Oconomowoc, WI

  • I want the client to dream his or her best dream, then I want to know the budget. I learned early on that if I design based on budget, no one wins. A young couple came into the studio. She wanted a yellow emerald-cut diamond in a split shank covered with diamonds, and a wedding band for him, and he had a $1,500 budget. Knowing the look she was going for, I found a semi-mount with melee diamonds. I found a killer soft yellow emerald-cut sapphire, and my shop hand-forged him a wedding band. With the sales tax, it came in at just under $1,500. They have been married over 10 years and have three kids, and they have always remembered we treated their dream with respect.

Look Out for Relatives

Chuck Kuba, Iowa Diamond, West Des Moines, IA

  • Beware the groom’s mother! They are surely the spawn of Smaug! We are thinking of selling a gift item for the bride to give to the groom. They’re called “Cut the Cord” scissors. 
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Drug Straight to the Heart

Ryan Karp Jr., Cornerstone Jewelry, Palos Park, IL

  • Selling my first engagement ring was a complete joy. Every time still feels like that first time. You’re involved in an intimate experience. To make their dreams come true is better than having my own dreams come true. Like a drug straight to the heart, it keeps us running and always wanting more.

Re-Educate When Necessary

Pat Henneberry, The Jewelry Coach and VP of learning  and development for Hearts On Fire 

  • Many years ago, the consumer came in with no information. They would try their best to learn about the 4Cs. Now they come to us overeducated, and some of the education is not the best. You kind of have to backtrack and start at square one. I like to start by educating them on cut and how important that is.

Find Margin in Mountings

Terry Chandler, President and CEO of the Diamond Council of America

  • When the bridal sector crosses into the millennial sector, the jeweler must have the knowledge, equipment, and expertise to create a one-of-a-kind engagement ring. Millennials want “their” engagement ring, not “an” engagement ring. 3 Amidst all the conversation about shrinking margins on larger center diamonds, the jeweler has an opportunity to make up margin on more diamond-set bridal mountings.

Be Very Good at Getting Them to Talk

Shane Decker, Sales trainer

  • If they’re shopping together, you need to ask her a lot of questions about style, fashion, what she’s seen, what she liked, if she has a photo on her phone. Too many people get defensive when they bring in a lab report from Blue Nile or James Allen or something. Say, “I’m so glad you did some research!” If they bring that in, it means they haven’t bought it yet.
  • The Internet doesn’t deliver an experience. So give them an incredible experience, get them talking about their engagement, their lives. This is something that’s among the top 10 most incredible memories of a woman’s life.
  • So many salespeople don’t know how to close. You have to have the ability to romance the product. When you drive up the value of the ring they want, that closes the sale.
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Do Not Be Afraid of Silence

Aleah Arundale, Olympian Diamonds 

  • The problem with most salespeople is they don’t stop talking! Decisions are not made while you are talking, they are made when the customer is thinking. Do not be afraid of silence. Give him the chance to have an inner conversation on how he will pay for it or picture how much she will love it. If you interrupt this, you kill the sale.
  • As strange as it sounds, the price of the diamond does not matter. Shoppers may tell you they saw a cheaper diamond somewhere else, but the more likely truth is that they are not sure what they saw. Think about it. Do most customers really understand diamonds? 
  • You need more and better reasons to buy from you. I call this a value story. Your value story can be that you buy second hand diamonds, or that you have 40 years buying experience, or that you just got back from Antwerp. Even telling customers you have the best warranty can give them that feeling of value and reasons to buy. Not everyone is a price shopper, but everyone is a value shopper.
  • Tell them the price early on. Why? Because all they are thinking is “how much?” “that’s nice but how much?” “would she/he shut up and just tell me how much?” By saying the price early, it shows you are not ashamed or scared of the price. Everything you say afterwards adds value to it.

It’s Not a Refrigerator

Douglas Elliott, Designer and partner, Marisa Perry Atelier, Manhattan

  • Customers deserve the best no matter what they spend. Our average sale is around $30,000. This is not a refrigerator or a car. You can’t make a mistake with an engagement ring and you’ve got to make sure these people are treated with love.
  • I don’t believe in emails for customers. If you’re spending $35,000, I want them to get a phone call.
  • I’ve learned to give the women what they want. They like a thin and delicate ring. We have the world’s thinnest wedding band. This is what the New York woman, between 25 and 35, is wearing today.
  • If the diamond isn’t beautiful, we don’t sell it. We made over 725 pieces of jewelry by hand last year. Everything is bespoke and made in New York. I pick every diamond in the store. And we sell only gold and platinum men’s bands. If you want to wear wood on your finger for the rest of your life, that’s your business, but you won’t find it here. 

Find Out What Exactly They Want

Marisa Perry, Marisa Perry Atelier, Manhattan

  • Everyone shopping for an engagement ring is scared. Guys are scared because they’re spending a lot of money and making a huge emotional commitment. They want to get it right. Girls are like “Oh my God, I need a ring! I don’t know what I want!” It’s important to let them try on a lot of options and make sure it’s what they want. It should be really fun. It’s not a science project like a lot of men make it out to be.
  • You have to make the customer feel at ease while getting the job done. It’s half business and half fun. Nobody walks out of my store without knowing what they want. We’ve asked them enough questions that they know what they want. They’re grateful. They’re relieved. They figured it out.

Educated Staff Clears Up Confusion

Harvey Rovinsky, Bernie Robbins Jewelers, NJ and PA

  • Education is one of the most important roles of the jeweler — for most clients, this is one of their first significant jewelry purchases. At Bernie Robbins, we have 5 C’s of diamonds: cut, color, clarity, carat, and confusion. Our team is highly educated on our diamonds’ quality, style and process of being responsibly mined.3 The rise of social media allows brides to see pieces online of different styles that they would not have seen otherwise. It also allows our sales team to better understand a bride’s style by seeing photos of pieces she “likes” online. 
  • Customers are increasingly looking to buy from local family-owned businesses instead of major chains to get the personalized, artisan experience.
  • An online presence is even more important as customers investigate a company’s website and social media channels before ever coming to the store, and we want to make sure they have the BR experience online and offline.

Go Deeper Into Collections

Megan Thorne, Designer

  • When it comes to designing rings, I’ve learned to leave room for customization. Styles that work only with a certain shape or size stone make accommodating clients’ stones difficult.
  • The biggest change I’ve observed in what women want is that size is no longer the defining diamond characteristic. Women care about quality, history and the ethical implications of a stone. 
  • My best advice for retailers selling designer engagement rings is to give space to each artist. There are so many talented designers and thousands of gorgeous rings, and it must be tempting to get a little here and a little there so that you can represent more designers. But limiting your selection to fewer artists and going deeper into the collection with each of them allows your team to establish a relationship with the brand and engage more knowledgeably and thoroughly with your clients.

Wedding Jewelry is Recession Proof

Asaf Herskovitz, GN Diamond 

  • People are too negative about millennials. Eighty-eight percent of them believe in getting engaged with a traditional natural diamond. I’m seeing millennials spending more on diamonds than their parents did. There are fewer smaller diamonds and more classic jewelry being brought back, like solitaire settings. Millennials still want natural diamonds and the industry is starting to explain a little bit better why one diamond outshines another diamond. They’re looking for a different life experience. Just being on Main Street for 25 years is not going to cut it any more. Stores need to provide a wow factor and education. 

Love is Love

Rony Tennenbaum, Designer 

  • There were a number of reasons I began designing wedding and engagement rings for the LGBT community. A little over 10 years ago, six states had the laws on the books that allowed gay couples to marry. I woke up one day and said, “I have so many friends who ask me about engagement rings,” but when you Googled gay and lesbian rings, all you would get were rainbow rings and triangle rings, and none of my friends or I would want to wear those as our wedding rings. 
  • I’d get hundreds of emails all of the time from couples seeking advice. I started lecturing on the topic because there’s a different dynamic involved. All we knew was what the tradition is for a traditional couple. Do we both get engagement rings? Do we need to have matching rings? They were asking me these questions. So that’s how I started my series of talks for couples called, “The New Etiquette of the Rainbow.” 
  • I can’t say wedding jewelry is “normalized” in the LGBT community. I think if anything, it’s an individualized niche where a lot of people do different things. No one believes it has to be a certain way. 
  • When the political arena was very favorable, I stepped back from targeting the LGBT market because there’s nothing about my jewelry that says, this is gay, this is straight. There’s no such thing as a gay ring. In my store, 80 percent of my clientele were straight and looking for something unique. I lost a little bit of the fire for LGBT only. Now we’re kind of back to it.
  • It is important that this is an LGBT line, that I am a gay designer and that I stand for LGBT rights. That’s where I feel most comfortable. In the current political climate, we’re going back a step to gay, proud and shout it at the top of our lungs: love is love. Let’s show people that we are here.

One Customer at a Time

Julie Terwilliger, Wexford Jewelers, Cadillac, MI

  • 3 I had a gentleman purchase a modest wedding set from us, and then his fiancée began working with me to exchange it for something bigger. She was a nightmare, and after countless changes to a designer name that we carry, we perfected what she wanted. She explained that she would be paying the difference personally as she made more money than her significant other. I then finalized and updated the invoice to collect a deposit for the new project. Unfortunately, it was automatically sent to the original email on file, which was the gentleman, who apparently had no idea that she had been working with me. It blew up and she was very upset. She intended to table the upgrade for maybe a year until this blew over, but it has been over three years now. Wondering if they are even together still. Lesson learned: email the invoice to the one paying. Ugh!

Become An Invited Guest

James Doggett, Doggett Jewelry, Kingston, NH

  • Over the past 40 years, I have found that the bride-to-be who is the most realistic about what her fiancé can afford stays married the longest and becomes a great repeat client. Remember, for the 5th or 10th anniversaries, the husbands will be back for “something bigger” and all those dates in between, birthdays, holidays, push gifts, they remember how reasonable you were when they were younger and poorer. In 1980 after the silver market crashed, I was working in an urban jewelry store when an “average Joe” came in looking for an engagement ring between $750 and $1,000. Store policy at the time was that you guilt them into $2,000 if they said they had a budget of $1,000. Breaking store rules, I showed him rings in his price range and reminded him that sizing was extra. He bought a nice ring from the estate tray for $900 plus tax. It fit his fiancée perfectly. They followed me when I opened my own store and have been clients ever since. Last Christmas, he bought his bride a sapphire and diamond necklace almost 25 times the price of her engagement ring.
  • I’m not looking to rip anyone off. I’m on the third generation with some families I’ve been dealing with for years. If I treat them right, they will keep coming back. There’s a reason I no longer have to advertise.
  • I am often invited to weddings (learn to dance, guys, and dance with anyone who is sitting alone at a table), where I am often introduced by the bride shaking her left hand at people saying “This is Jim, he made my rings!” Husbands introduce me to their friends and suggest they come to me when they are ready to do “something good for a change.”

Eileen McClelland is the Managing Editor of INSTORE. She believes that every jewelry store has the power of cool within them.

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Best of The Best

Milwaukee Jeweler Launches Diversity Internship Program

Store owner was inspired by mentoring program for underprivileged teen girls.

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TOM DIXON, owner of Schwanke-Kasten Jewelers in Milwaukee, like many a jewelry storeowner, is frequently asked for donations to community causes. Often, he’d respond by donating a piece of jewelry. But the whole process lacked a cohesive goal and sometimes fell short of expectations.

“It seems sometimes like we’re spinning our wheels, giving things to people who maybe need it, but in general it tends to be more affluent groups asking for donations. I thought, let’s re-evaluate it and do something that’s meaningful with underfunded projects in Milwaukee where we can really make a difference.”

Dixon devised a framework for donations with the acronym EACH to benefit initiatives in the areas of education, arts, community and health. “Instead of giving everyone who asks $100 or $1,000, we can start a foundation and contribute some meaningful time and value and sweat equity.”

Dixon also believes there’s a racial divide in the city and a lack of diversity in the jewelry industry. The racial divide hit home when his store made national news in 2015. Milwaukee Bucks forward John Henson told the media he’d been racially profiled when he visited the store to look at a Rolex. Due to what Dixon describes as a misunderstanding with police about Henson’s dealer license plate and a series of suspicious calls around the same time of the pro basketball player’s visit, employees decided not to use the buzzer system to open the door and instead called the police.

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Dixon says everything possible went wrong leading up to that fateful moment, and other jewelry storeowners have told him it could easily happen to them, too.

“It was a circumstantial situation,” Dixon says. “We apologized. That was never in our hearts. But it made us want to say, ‘Here are the things we’re doing to try to make a change.’”

He wants to make a difference not only in the community but also in the jewelry industry by cultivating potential local talent. So he launched a paid internship program to reach out to young people of diverse backgrounds, who wouldn’t normally apply for jobs in his store. The focus is on young college women looking for summer jobs.

He teamed up with Milwaukee-based PEARLS for Teen Girls, which he describes as the most inspiring, remarkable organization he’s encountered. Last year, the group mentored 1,618 underprivileged girls across all racial and ethnic groups. Of the young women in the program, 100 percent graduated high school and were on track for college. PEARLS stands for Personal Responsibility, Empathy, Awareness, Respect, Leadership and Support. One of the important goals of the organization is to prevent teen pregnancy.

Dixon is working with Danita Bush, college and career readiness manager for PEARLS, who supports girls and young women as they navigate job, college and scholarship applications.
Dixon offered two paid internships this past summer to graduates of the PEARLS program.

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PEARLS will help him reach out to young women who wouldn’t otherwise be exposed to the jewelry industry. Dixon can offer sophisticated training in cooperation with high-end brand partners that include Roberto Coin and Rolex. He’d also be interested in sending interns to the GIA for education if they express a serious interest in pursuing jewelry as a career.

“Maybe we’ll get someone who really sticks and becomes part of our staff,” he says. “I’m open to finding artistic people to learn watchmaking or goldsmithing.”

“When I go to trade shows, I notice the lack of diversity. It’s an issue that we have got to deal with. I’m going to try to deal with it in my own world, here.”

Schwanke-Kastan Jewelers in Milwaukee.

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America's Coolest Stores

These Retailers Know What (Manhattan) Women Want

Couple creates inviting niche for Manhattan’s bridal elite.

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Marisa Perry, New York

OWNERS: Marisa Perry and Douglas Elliott; FOUNDED: 2002; OPENED FEATURED LOCATION: 2015; ARCHITECT: Julie Hardridge/Architexture; EMPLOYEES: 5 full-time and 2 part-time; AREA: 1,000 square feet, TOP BRANDS: Douglas Elliott, Christian Bauer, Benchmark, Zenove, Marisa Perry


 

MARISA PERRY knew it was past time to move her store into larger quarters when she realized that the staff member in charge of manufacturing (the most organized man she’d ever met) had a desk so small that diamonds were sliding off its surface and becoming ensnared in electrical cords.

Transitioning from 500 square feet in Soho to 1,000 square feet in the West Village may not seem like that big a deal, but doubling the space of a ground-floor atelier is a leap of faith when Manhattan-size rents are involved.

The wish list was: spacious, functional, secure and compatible with the distinctive look and feel of the brand.

“We carried over the design elements of the store,” Perry says. “The chandeliers were a signature look in my old store, three chandeliers running down the center.” So, of course, the chandeliers made the trip to the West Village location on Hudson Street, which turned out to be perfect.

“It’s the bomb. It’s mind-blowing,” Perry says. “When I moved here, Hudson had a lot of closed stores. It’s turned out to be a spectacular location, which I did not know in advance of renting it. A lot of my customers find me by being in the neighborhood.”
The look and feel of the place also needed to appeal to a client of 25 to 35, the demographic at the heart of the business, which is shared by Perry and her husband, jewelry designer Douglas Elliott.

When the couple met in 2001, Perry fell in love with Elliott and his jewelry designs at the same time, she says. Elliott was then designing a fashion-driven, semi-precious jewelry collection, Elliott, which was sold at Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue, among other stores. Concurrently, he maintained a custom jewelry design business for private clients, for whom he created elaborate diamond pieces. Enchanted, Marisa saw an opportunity to create a new venture to bring Elliott’s diamond jewelry designs to the forefront.

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Prior to establishing her fine jewelry company, Marisa had a successful career in gourmet food marketing, working with top chefs and artisanal food producers. Born and raised in Los Angeles, she moved to New York City to work in the fashion world after graduating from L.A.’s Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.

Together, they launched Marisa Perry Atelier in 2002. At the new location, Marisa Perry Atelier showcases Elliott’s artistry along with a curated selection of pieces by other designers. They specialize in diamond jewelry, with a particular focus on wedding jewelry, including engagement rings, wedding bands, and other custom-crafted pieces.

While the previous store had the look of a Parisian boutique, Perry wanted this one to combine classic and antique elements — French moldings, custom-made showcases and luxurious furnishings — with contemporary lighting elements and edgy art. Pops of color from fresh flowers add drama to the soothingly neutral room with its light and airy ambience and diaphanous white draperies.
A long, custom-made community table is the centerpiece of the store’s selling area.

“No matter what I have in my showcase, people want to design their own rings,” Perry says. “They want it round instead of emerald cut, 2-carat instead of 3-carat. We get a selection of diamonds in and they pick it. We make sure they get the best stone for their money.”

Salespeople can be as comfortable as clients when they’re collaborating around the table, where Elliott works on the pieces from drawing to execution, choosing every diamond, no matter its size, himself. Elliott and his team made 725 pieces of jewelry by hand last year.

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“Customers deserve the best no matter what they spend,” Elliott says. “But our average sale is around $30,000. This is not a refrigerator or a car. You can’t make a mistake with an engagement ring, and you’ve got to make sure these people are treated with love. If the diamond isn’t beautiful, we don’t sell it. Everything is bespoke and made in New York.”

The experience of shopping at Marisa Perry Atelier is elegant, of course, and serious, but also relaxed and inviting. Max 2.0, the couple’s chocolate Lab, is the company’s greeter.

“Every sale is a party,” Perry says. “We hand them a glass of champagne. On weekends, men don’t have to wear a suit, so they’ll come in with their dog, carrying a coffee cup and wearing gym clothes and buy a $50,000 diamond. It’s very relaxed, easy to just pop in. It should be really fun and not a science project like a lot of men make it out to be.”

Elliott says most of the New York brides-to-be he works with want the most delicate diamond rings possible with very thin bands.
While Perry runs the business and marketing side, Elliott runs design and production.

“He has his department and I have mine,” Perry says. “ If I want a piece of jewelry made I can tell him, but whether he makes it or not is his choice. I’m not allowed to interfere. He wants full creative control. Our marriage would not survive my butting in.”
On the other hand, Perry has complete control over branding, marketing, decor, and how the company is run.

“We’re very compatible and we’re both strong people,” Perry says. “He’s really bossy. I can be very bossy. By some miracle we get along well. We understand each other. We will ruffle some feathers, but it just kind of works. We do respect each other’s boundaries … sort of.”

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5 Cool Things About Marisa Perry Atelier

Behind the magic curtain. To accommodate celebrities and others seeking privacy, concealed pocket doors can be closed to make the back half of the store completely private. There’s also a side entrance behind a blue drape.

Trial period. Perry credits divine intervention for finally being able to have the level of talented staff she’s always wanted. But because of some difficulty hiring in the past, she began asking job candidates to work for three months before either party made a commitment.

Sales strategy. “We do a lot of training, and Douglas and I are involved in every sale. We talk strategy before every appointment. If they’re walking in my store — unless they’re here to shop for a gift — they’re going to buy an engagement ring. It’s just a question of whether they buy it from us or not. There’s lots of competition from the Internet and 47th Street, but people are willing to pay more for our settings, because they are better.”

If the shoe fits. They created a Christian Louboutin sales incentive program. “When any employee hits a certain profit margin on any given sale, we take them to the Christian Louboutin men’s or women’s boutique for a pair of shoes of their choice,” Perry says. “We love that brand and we wear that designer shoe most all the time.”

Only precious metals. “I was selling tungsten carbide because I love it, but I’d have to tell a guy I didn’t recommend it because if something happens, you can’t cut this ring off your finger,” Perry says. “It’s dangerous. The ER can cut silver and gold right off you, but not tungsten carbide. I’m like the mother hen for my customers. I want them to have something they can leave to their son or grandson.” Elliott strongly agrees that men’s bands should be made only in gold and platinum. “If you want to wear wood on your finger for the rest of your life, that’s your business, but you won’t find it here,” he says.

 

Try This: Be Specific About Responsibilities

The buck stops there. Each team member has specific jobs for which they are ultimately responsible. “It’s great for me as an employer because if something doesn’t happen, I know who to go to,” Perry says. “The buck stops there.” Not having assigned responsibilities for every staff member is the most critical mistake business owners can make, Perry says.

And Try This Too …

Express yourself. “We have started to put extra emphasis on encouraging our employees’ individuality by having them dress in their own unique style and sell in their own unique way,” Perry says. “We think it is better for them to be different from one another and create a balanced set of skills and talents over all, then all be the same, and all offer the same things. Employees are happiest when they can be themselves and are encouraged to develop their own self in a safe and happy environment.”

 

What Our America’s Coolest Judges Said

  • Sofia Kaman: Everything about this store is so cohesive, and represents high-quality craftsmanship. From the online experience to the marketing materials, to that adorable dog, I’d want to shop here!
  • Lyn Falk: Great story and fun interior with interesting pops of design elements (chandeliers, black and white wall mural).
  • Tiffany Stevens: Inviting and organized; very attractive.
  • Mia Katrin: The husband and wife collaboration is a nice touch. A compelling story for a bridal boutique!
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    Jewelry Store Continues Under New Ownership, Mixing Old Ways with Modern Technology

    It’s one of 51 stores reported closed or under new ownership in September.

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    Pictured here are Mary Loose Deviney, right, with her late mother, Francis Elizabeth Gibson Loose

    AMONG THE 51 STORES reported closed or under new ownership in September by the Jewelers Board of Trade, there’s been a changing of the guard at Tuel Jewelers, a mainstay of brick-lined, pedestrians-only Main Street in Charlottesville, VA, since 1945.

    History is everything in Charlottesville, founded in 1762. Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe were born here. Jefferson’s Monticello is a few miles outside town. The University of Virginia, which he founded, is based here, on a campus designated as a World Heritage site. Tuel’s — whose most consistent seller over the years is the silver Jefferson cup, designed by the third president — dates its own history to the era when railroad watchmakers and repair shops began to add jewelry items, mostly for men at first, tie-tacks and cufflinks, then engagement rings and wedding jewelry, creating a post-War generation of hometown jewelry stores. 

    Local resident Francis Elizabeth Gibson went to work as a bookkeeper for Tuel’s in 1953, gradually earning GIA certification through a correspondence course. In 1975, with the support of husband Hermann Loose, a Swiss-born cattle rancher, she bought the store, thus becoming the first female merchant in town.

    Francis Elizabeth Gibson Loose’s last day at work was Dec. 28, 2017. When she died eight days later, at 86, the local movie theater mourned her with a marquee reading “A jewel is lost in downtown.” By the time Francis Loose’s daughter Mary entered the store in the 1960s, at two days old, Tuel’s already was on its way to becoming the community center it remains today.

    “After 9-11, this is where people came to just sit in the chairs and talk,” says new owner Mary Loose Deviney. “I mean, it’s a store, a way of deriving income, sure, but Tuel’s is so much more than that. It’s almost a creature, a living thing in this community. I don’t really think of myself as the owner. I’m more like the caretaker.”

    Mary Loose Deviney left home to study accounting at college, then returned to Charlottsville take care of her grandmother, working at the store part-time. She had intended to move away to a position with one of big eight international accounting firms of the 1980s, but then after her grandmother’s death she took her mother aside and said, “I think I’d like to stay on, if you’ll have me.” 

    Any regrets to passing on a chance at a larger world than her hometown?

    “Oh no, not a one,” Mary Deviney says. “That was one of Momma’s lessons. Try to live without regrets.” 

    Mary combines her Old World skills with customers and on the bench with savvy modern business training, sprinkling her conversations with references to “our analytics.”

    Although sales are all still rung up on a crank cash register in the front of the store, there’s a modern computer system at work in the back. 

    “I have always felt that technology is our friend,” Mary says, citing its influence on the manufacture of today’s lighter, cheaper jewelry. “I think the more people wearing jewelry, the better, you know. They develop the habit.”

    As for technology’s effect on sales, there is almost a shrug in her voice as she says, “An internet site can’t make repairs or size a ring. The colors on the internet are not true to life. Photographs are easily manipulated as to size. At this point, people have had that one or two bad experiences buying online. They know that if they want quality they have to go to an honest-to-goodness jewelry store.

    “Our business is about relationships, and relationships are long-term.”

    Any changes in store under the new caretaker of Tuel Jewelers?

    “Oh no, no, no,” says Mary Deviney. “I think our customers would revolt.”

    Editor’s note: Of the 54 stores in the JBT’s preliminary figures for September– slightly more than the 51 stores reported in final numbers for the previous month — three were listed as consolidations, eight as acquisitions, and the balance as discontinuances.

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