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The Essential Lessons of the Late Zig Ziglar

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The Essential Lessons of the Late Zig Ziglar

One of the great sales teachers of our time – Zig Ziglar – passed away last week at the ripe, rich age of 86.

We’ll miss him, but we’ll remember his lessons for a long, long time.

Despite his dozens of books, Zig was not the most erudite of teachers. Part of the Dale Carnegie tradition, he didn’t fill his books with charts and Zenn diagrams. Or break down the psychological underpinnings of the various customer types to help you out-maneuver customers on the way a sale.

Zig made it his business to fix you. Quite correctly. His only mission was to make your attitude the best it could possibly be.

For me, here was the first key takeaway from Zig’s obituary in the New York Times.

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He told a story about a woman in Alabama who he said was bitter about her job and angry with her co-workers. He advised her to write down whatever positives she could thing of — the solid paycheck, the benefits, the vacation time — and then stare into the mirror and say how much she loved her job. Six weeks later, he ran into her again.

“I’m doing wonderfully well,” she told him with a bright smile, adding, “You cannot believe how much those people down there have changed.”

And here was the second:

“Our whole philosophy’s built around the concept that you can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want,” he said [in an interview]. “That works in your personal life, your physical life. It works in corporate America. It works in government. It works everywhere.”

One of a kind. Last of an era. Goodbye, Zig Ziglar.

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David Squires

The Essential Lessons of the Late Zig Ziglar

Published

on

The Essential Lessons of the Late Zig Ziglar

One of the great sales teachers of our time – Zig Ziglar – passed away last week at the ripe, rich age of 86.

We’ll miss him, but we’ll remember his lessons for a long, long time.

Despite his dozens of books, Zig was not the most erudite of teachers. Part of the Dale Carnegie tradition, he didn’t fill his books with charts and Zenn diagrams. Or break down the psychological underpinnings of the various customer types to help you out-maneuver customers on the way a sale.

Zig made it his business to fix you. Quite correctly. His only mission was to make your attitude the best it could possibly be.

Advertisement

For me, here was the first key takeaway from Zig’s obituary in the New York Times.


He told a story about a woman in Alabama who he said was bitter about her job and angry with her co-workers. He advised her to write down whatever positives she could thing of — the solid paycheck, the benefits, the vacation time — and then stare into the mirror and say how much she loved her job. Six weeks later, he ran into her again.

“I’m doing wonderfully well,” she told him with a bright smile, adding, “You cannot believe how much those people down there have changed.”

And here was the second:

“Our whole philosophy’s built around the concept that you can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want,” he said [in an interview]. “That works in your personal life, your physical life. It works in corporate America. It works in government. It works everywhere.”

Advertisement

One of a kind. Last of an era. Goodbye, Zig Ziglar.

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */
var disqus_shortname = ‘instoremag’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */
(function() {
var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;
dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus.com/embed.js’;
(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);
})();

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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