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They Make This Jewelry from Actual Bombs

The explosives are from the Vietnam War era.

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New York-based Article 22 makes its jewelry from an unusual source material: bombs.

It uses pieces of undetonated munitions recovered from Laos, the Huffington Post reports. The explosives are from the Vietnam War era.

When a device is destroyed, the owner of the property where it was found often sells the material to a foundry. Article 22 then buys those scraps and has local workers craft the material into jewelry.

The designs are by Article 22 founders Elizabeth Suda and Camille Hautefort. The jewelry, including necklaces, earrings, bracelets and other pieces, sells for $20 to $2,000, with 10 percent of proceeds going to the nonprofit Mines Advisory Group.

The pieces are available online and through “150 small partners around the world,” according to the Huffington Post.

The U.S. bombing in Laos during the Vietnam era is sometimes referred to as “America’s secret war.” The Huffington Post explains: “For nearly a decade, U.S. warplanes dropped more than 270 million cluster munitions in Laos, making it the most bombed country in the world, per capita.”

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They Make This Jewelry from Actual Bombs Article 22 makes jewelry from Vietnam War-era bombs.

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