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Wealthy Millennials Prefer These Jewelry Brands, Study Finds

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The research also looked at watch brands.

Tiffany & Co. is the favorite luxury jewelry brand of the “wealthy millennial” consumer segment in the U.S., according to a new study.

Rounding out the top five in the research by MVI Marketing are Cartier, Pandora, Chanel and Gucci.

MVI conducted the study online with 978 male and female respondents ages 25-40 and with a household income of $80,000 or more.

The jewelry question was asked of female respondents only.

MVI noted: “In luxury jewelry brand favorites Tiffany is very strong across all incomes and ages with a solid following in the $100k-$150k household income segment.”

The research also looked at the watch category, where Rolex proved to be the favorite brand among wealthy millennials. The question was asked of male respondents only. Rolex was followed by Apple, Omega, Cartier and Tag Heuer.

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Other categories examined were fashion (apparel), shoes, handbags, hotels, automobiles and eyewear.

With this report, MVI has launched LuxConsumer, a new research service helping luxury brands to understand and communicate with younger luxury consumers.

The full report is available at MVIMarketing.com.

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