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What does your brand promise really mean?

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As you know, the brand is the identity of a specific product, service or business (Wikipedia). While it seems that everyone is talking about branding these days, I’m getting the impression that among some, branding still feels like an abstract and something they are doing because they should rather than to garner any sort of benefit. 

 

When people talk about a brand promise, they are referring to statement or a sentence that communicates the one thing that the brand represents or intends to own in mind of the target consumer. Meaning, something the target consumer will associate with your company that communicates what unique benefit you deliver to the consumer. A brand promise needs to be clear, concise, believable, unique and catchy. 

Here are a few questions that might help you when developing a brand promise:

  1. What unique benefit does your brand provide?
  2. Who is your target consumer?
  3. Is the benefit mentioned valuable to the target audience?
  4. What makes your organization uniquely qualified to provide it?
  5. Looking at your competition, are they touting a similar promise? If so, time to re-work.

According to Businessdictionary.com: “Benefits and experiences that marketing campaigns try to associate with a product in its current and prospective consumers’ minds.” is a brand promise.

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It’s important to note that in many cases it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to differentiate a brand based on functional attributes alone. For that reason, a shift in focus to more relationship oriented benefits, such as ease of process or customer service may be a stronger direction to take for developing a brand promise. That’s why it’s essential that the message you communicate to your target audience, needs to be communicated with and believed in by employees at every level as ultimately it’s the front-end staff that need to be able to deliver the brand promise to the customer.

In the end, it’s a strong brand that’s more likely to experience growth and higher returns because people know what they can expect to receive and how it will affect their lives. Successful companies have discovered that brands are their most valuable asset (along with their people) for numerous reasons – but the key is that you have to make promises you can really keep. In the end, if you do your job and keep your promise, customers will be loyal to you and your brand.

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Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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What does your brand promise really mean?

mm

Published

on

As you know, the brand is the identity of a specific product, service or business (Wikipedia). While it seems that everyone is talking about branding these days, I’m getting the impression that among some, branding still feels like an abstract and something they are doing because they should rather than to garner any sort of benefit. 

 

When people talk about a brand promise, they are referring to statement or a sentence that communicates the one thing that the brand represents or intends to own in mind of the target consumer. Meaning, something the target consumer will associate with your company that communicates what unique benefit you deliver to the consumer. A brand promise needs to be clear, concise, believable, unique and catchy. 

Here are a few questions that might help you when developing a brand promise:

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  1. What unique benefit does your brand provide?
  2. Who is your target consumer?
  3. Is the benefit mentioned valuable to the target audience?
  4. What makes your organization uniquely qualified to provide it?
  5. Looking at your competition, are they touting a similar promise? If so, time to re-work.

According to Businessdictionary.com: “Benefits and experiences that marketing campaigns try to associate with a product in its current and prospective consumers’ minds.” is a brand promise.

 

It’s important to note that in many cases it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to differentiate a brand based on functional attributes alone. For that reason, a shift in focus to more relationship oriented benefits, such as ease of process or customer service may be a stronger direction to take for developing a brand promise. That’s why it’s essential that the message you communicate to your target audience, needs to be communicated with and believed in by employees at every level as ultimately it’s the front-end staff that need to be able to deliver the brand promise to the customer.

In the end, it’s a strong brand that’s more likely to experience growth and higher returns because people know what they can expect to receive and how it will affect their lives. Successful companies have discovered that brands are their most valuable asset (along with their people) for numerous reasons – but the key is that you have to make promises you can really keep. In the end, if you do your job and keep your promise, customers will be loyal to you and your brand.

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular