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What’s The Risk of Adding ‘Gift-Priced’ Items and More of Your Questions for May

Lowering threshold resistance without hurting your image is tricky. Here are some ideas.

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I’m thinking of introducing more lower price-point items to get more people in the door. But as a fine jeweler, I worry about how we will be perceived.

Threshold resistance is a real problem for many jewelers, but it’s a tough balancing act. It also requires close attention to return on effort, inventory turn and a host of other factors. John Carom, owner of Abby’s Gold & Gems in Uniontown, PA, says he faced a similar dilemma several years ago and was criticized by some of his peers for going “down market.” Ultimately, though, he’s sure it was the right move. “Carrying jewelry gifts under $200 and even under $50 retail brought us literally thousands of new customers each year for several years,” he says. Carom acknowledges most of these people were never converted to larger purchasers. “But,” he points out, “most of our best and most frequent customers were introduced to us by these market-friendly gifts, with some spending tens of thousands of dollars each every year because they came through the door for a hot low-end item.” Even if you decide not to go with an enhanced selection of gift goods, you need to make sure through your marketing, displays and price tagging that everyone in your market believes they can come into your store and find something for their budget. High end or lower end, you’re at no end if no one comes in the door. As Carom notes: “Traffic building is profit building.”

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I know I should be focused on my business, but I get an almost warped glee out of competing fiercely with the unethical schmuck up the road. There’s nothing wrong with having such an enemy, is there?

Indeed, there’s plenty of psychological research that testifies to the fact that humans partly enjoy having enemies; they clarify the world for us and bolster our sense of righteousness. So sure, why not channel this sometimes less-than-admirable truth to good ends? And it’s certainly easier to keep an eye on what your rivals are up to in the Internet era. The only thing we’d say is that you don’t lose sight of who your REAL enemy is. Is it the guy so bad at business he’s cutting legal corners, or is it Amazon, or something else — like your own complacency, inertia, or fear of change that poses an existential threat to your business? Enjoy your day-to-day skirmishes with the schmuck around the corner, use it to motivate yourself, but channel your energies into evolving and growing your business.
I am interested in selling gem carvings at my jewelry store. Any advice on what to buy and how to sell them?
e Start small, says AGTA Cutting Edge award-winner Sherris Cottier Shank. Set aside a display case — two feet wide is plenty. Include a half-dozen or so carvings on miniature pedestals and give them lots of visual space. If the case doesn’t look full enough to you, maybe include some information on the carver. Shank guarantees such a display will serve as a conversation starter in your store, and adds that it’s a great way to increase your customers’ appreciation of the beauty and rarity of colored gemstones.

What are an appraiser’s best options to assess the value of a rare, one-of-a-kind or unusual piece of jewelry that can’t be researched?

If information on your piece cannot be found in any of the industry price guides and catalogs or at online forums, Stuart Robertson, research director at Gemworld International, suggests you canvas museum curators, auction houses and estate dealers. “Remember, if an item has value, it likely has a market. Consulting auctioneers and dealers can provide clues to finding and evaluating that market. The sale of comparable items is usually a good indicator of value,” says Robertson.

How can I get my salespeople to sell the older merchandise in the store?

Start by appealing to their belief in the possible, something all good salespeople should possess. Remind them too, in the nicest way, that there’s no accounting for taste. “Remember that somebody at the manufacturer was inspired enough by the idea of the product to create it. And remember that somebody else in your company liked it enough to buy it,” says sales trainer Harry Friedman. That makes at least two professionals out there — whose opinions they should respect — who believe in this particular product, he says. It also means that even though this piece may make them shake their heads in wonderment, there’s a reasonable chance there’s a customer out there who will like it too, so show it proudly. If that doesn’t do the trick, opt for an aggressive commission, says David Geller. “The commission many stores pay usually isn’t enough to get people excited,” he says, recommending you try doubling or tripling it. “If you normally pay a salary plus 3 percent, pay 9 percent on old items. It won’t cost that much, relatively speaking. A $500 item with 3 percent commission costs you $15 … at 9 percent, $45. Thirty bucks to unload a $500 item? Cheaper than a deeper discount, Charlie!”

Over the years, INSTORE has won 80 international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact INSTORE's editors at [email protected].

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