Connect with us

David Geller

Why Taking Another Day Off Could Help More Than It Hurts

Cutting your work week to four days could ease your mind while maintaining your bottom line.

mm

Published

on

IF YOU’RE LIKE ME, you’re a workaholic. Some just love their work; others have nothing else to do.

When I owned a store, I always worked six days. Even though the store was closed on Mondays, the shop was working on Monday. We did try a four-day work week in the beginning. The reason was selfish. When we started in 1974, we were open on Saturdays. With no kids, I had a hobby: remote control airplanes. Had to do home chores on Saturday so I could fly on Sundays.

At the time, I had six employees and we were open five days, but all employees worked four days a week, 10 hours a day (7 a.m.-6 p.m.). Admittedly, it was tough getting people to work on time at 7 a.m.

There was one less day of breaks and lunches. The jewelers were more productive and enjoyed having three days off. We rotated, and every other weekend, they would have three days off in a row (otherwise, they had two days off together and one day off in the middle). The schedule stayed that way until we moved to a larger shopping center and we went to five 8-hour days. Don’t remember why.

What about the owner working four days? You are the boss, aren’t you? When I started creating my price guide, I took a day off from the store weekly and worked at home. Still working, but uninterrupted. Got a lot done.

Why won’t most store owners shorten their work week?

Advertisement

I know because I was a culprit.

You might make most of the store sales and figure that if you’re not there, sales will drop. Or maybe you don’t trust your staff. Or maybe you wouldn’t know what to do with yourself.

Before selling my store, other jewelers asked me to go to their stores to help them, and I was also speaking at state associations. I was absent a lot. What I learned from being away from the store was this: given the opportunity, the staff would step up to the plate and do a great job. We had store meetings bi-monthly, so the staff was already trained. By letting them take over, they learn even more and are eager to earn your trust.

Although sometimes I didn’t like a decision they made, it all worked out. It gave me the freedom to “think” and do better.

Many of the most successful stores I have visited are owners who “let go” and don’t micro-manage everything. Trying taking off during the week on your slowest day and see what that does for you for 30 days. You’ll be amazed.

David Geller is a 14th-generation bench jeweler who produces The Geller Blue Book To Jewelry Repair Pricing. David is the “go-to guy” for setting up QuickBooks for a jewelry store. Reach him at [email protected].

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

Wilkerson Helped This Jeweler to Navigate His Retirement Sale Despite a Pandemic

Hosting a going-out-of-business sale when the coronavirus pandemic hit wasn’t a part of Bob Smith’s game plan for his retirement. Smith, the owner of E.M. Smith Jewelers in Chillicothe, Ohio, says the governor closed the state mid-way through. But Smith chose Wilkerson, and Wilkerson handled it like a champ, says Smith. And when it was time for the state to reopen, the sale continued like nothing had ever happened. “I’d recommend Wilkerson,” he says. “They do business the way we do business.”

Promoted Headlines

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

INSTORE helps you become a better jeweler
with the biggest daily news headlines and useful tips.
(Mailed 5x per week.)

Facebook

Latest Comments

Most Popular