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2019 Golden Globes Feature Dramatic Jewelry Looks You Can Adapt for Yourself

A-list actresses wore looks that can translate into everyday life.

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THE 76TH GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS kicked off the awards season with a dazzling dose glamour in dramatic jewelry that shone brightly. Diamonds dominated the evening in some of the most awe-inspiring necklaces we have seen in seasons, such as the Tiffany & Co. stunner that Lady Gaga wore and the antique, vintage and inspired styles seen on Dakota Fanning, Isla Fisher, Constance Wu and Michelle Yeoh.

Sure, we all need one stunning diamond necklace. But unless we need to be black-tie-ready on a regular basis or plan on attending red carpet events throughout the season, owning one of these pieces might be out of step with our lifestyles.

The other trends of the evening are more easily adaptable to what we can incorporate into our own jewelry wardrobes and can translate more easily into pieces we can buy, own and wear.

If you are like me, you might have watched the show and started longing for a pair of earrings that are lightweight yet are streamlined, linear and full of movement. We might choose a pair with less carat-weight, but these styles are definitely inspiring and are perfect when spring rolls around. They can work with everything from tanks and T-shirts to flirty or more sophisticated dresses. Here are some of our favorites that A-list actresses wore:

Julia Roberts in diamond Chopard double drop linear earrings.Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

Lupita Nyong’o in Bulgari earrings with swing and movement.Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

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Lili Reinhardt in Swarovski earrings. Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

Claire Foy in platinum and diamond Lorraine Schwartz elongated and an armful of bangles. Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

You might also prefer your bracelets piled on and climbing up your wrist. I know I do. We might not be able to create a blinged-out diamond story like these celebrities, but we can start our stack with a bangle, an Art Deco-inspired line bracelet or a wide cuff and then add to them when we can. Here are some of the looks that made my jaw drop. Once again, these are styles that go with almost any look in your wardrobe as long as you don’t allow your own sparkle to be outshined by your jewels.

Charlize Theron in stacks of Bulgari bracelets. Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

Julianne Moore in Chopard ruby and diamond bracelets. Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

Sandra Oh in platinum and diamond bracelets by Forevermark, Forevermark by Martin Flyer, Forevermark by Natalie K and Forevermark by Maria Canale. Photo courtesy of Forevermark

Kristen Bell in Harry Winston diamond bracelets. Photo courtesy of Rex/Shutterstock

Beth Bernstein is a published author of three books and jewelry and fashion expert with 18+ years experience. A broad knowledge of the history of jewelry and fashion coupled with a background in "the story", writing, trends, design concepts has earned Beth a proven track record.

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Wilkerson Testimonials

Cleaning House for a New Generation

At Komara Jewelers in Canfield, Ohio, Wilkerson handled all the aspects of its retirement sale just as owner Bob Komara’s children took over day-to-day operations of the business. They’d used other companies before, says Brianna Komara-Pridon, but they didn’t compare. “If we had used Wilkerson then, it would have been so much better.”

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Editor's Note

Why Excuses Are The Enemy of Learning

To get better in business and life, you must first embrace failure.

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“If you continue to be defensive every time I give you constructive criticism, you’ll never learn anything.”

I was in my mid-20s when a mentor and former employer said those words to me, and I’ve never forgotten the lesson. When you make excuses, you lose the opportunity to learn from failure and improve yourself.

It’s more difficult than it sounds. Human nature is to look outside oneself for a source of blame. No one wants to be thought of as “a failure.”

And yet, if you’re willing to bow to the requirements of wisdom, your confidence can only rise as your quest for improvement moves forward.

Our magazine is all about education, and we figured there’s no better teacher than failure — thus, you hold in your hands, “The Failure Issue.” Inside, you’ll find stories from successful businesspeople who aren’t afraid to admit how they failed, and how that failure was transformative.

For example, check out columnist David Geller’s story of how he went from near-bankruptcy to profitable through a cash-flow crucible. And read about David Nygaard’s odyssey from multi-store owner to personal jeweler and city councilman through bankruptcy and divorce.

It all starts with a willingness to learn — and if you didn’t have that, you wouldn’t be reading INSTORE. So read on, and prepare to get the most from failure!

Trace Shelton

Editor-in-Chief, INSTORE
trace@smartworkmedia.com

Five Smart Tips You’ll Find in This Issue

  • Have employees wear white cotton gloves when moving product around to keep skin oil off jewelry. (Manager’s To-Do List, p. 30)
  • Hold “failure reviews” when anything goes wrong in your business. (The Big Story, p. 40)
  • Keep a Failure Wall in a back room where you and your staff can share “growth lessons.” (The Big Story, p. 40)
  • In job postings, describe your company, your reputation and your goals. (Ask INSTORE, p. 62)
  • Reward your clients through a Brand Ambassador program that compensates them for sharing their enthusiasm for brands. (Cool Stores, p. 78
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Dave Richardson

Why Ignoring Young Customers Could Come Back to Haunt You

Sales trainer David Richardson says this is an opportunity to make a client for life.

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WHY IT IS TRUE: The 12-year-old spending $25 today might be back for an engagement ring in 10 years.
PLAN OF ACTION: Put him or her at ease and ask questions about the gift recipient. Treat them as though they were an adult, show them respect, and you just may have a customer for life.

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Commentary: The Business

How Failure Leads to Growth

If you don’t try, nothing will change, says growth expert Elle Hill.

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WHY ISN’T SHE breathing?” my mom asked the doctor, her eyes darting back and forth between the syringe and me. An injection and a few moments later, my breathing returned to normal, but my childhood never did. Instead, I began my carefully curated asthma life.

Everything I was allowed to do was designed to avoid the risk of failing. I was swaddled tight and never allowed to push beyond what we knew I could safely do.

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After university, I sat in my first apartment in New York City and made a decision that changed everything: I would run the New York City Marathon.

I’d go out every night after work, in the yellow light of the street lamps, armed with my inhaler and my steroid pills. And I would run. I would run until I heard the first wheeze. And continue until my breath became too shallow and I couldn’t run anymore.

That first night, I ran for four minutes. I stopped. I took my inhaler. I walked back home.

I had an ache in the pit of my chest, not from the wheezing, but from the fear of failure: I might do this night after night, and still not be able to run. I had never done anything I wasn’t sure I could do before. But if I didn’t try, nothing would change.

So, I repeated this for three weeks until I could run for 10 minutes. And five more weeks until I doubled that. In November of 1999, five months later, I ran the New York City Marathon in four hours and 35 minutes.

What I learned is how important failure is. It’s not a byproduct of success — it is the road to success. If you never fail, you’re playing it too safe. If you only act when you know you will succeed, you will never learn something new or reach your potential.

In the years after my marathon finish, I have had a new philosophy: I choose what I do next based on what intimidates me most. It’s why I started my own jewelry store, discovered it was a bad business model, and overhauled it. Each painful failure was a hard-won lesson that made me better, smarter, faster. And ultimately, I brought my company public in a $10 million IPO in less than five years.

Taking a leap when you can’t guarantee success is exactly what you must do to learn, to grow.

To succeed, you must first aim to fail.

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