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Laurie Owen: Leaders and Occupancy Costs

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[h3]4.8%[/h3]

What is it? How much the top performers in the 2004 Jewelers Financial Benchmarking Study spent on occupancy costs. An occupancy cost of 4.8% means that for every $1 of sales, the company spends about 5 cents on occupancy costs, such as rent, occupancy, utilities, and store security.

Strategy: How to get by with spending less? Start by comparing yourself to others. Find industry benchmarks and see how you stack up, line by line. Monitor your expenses monthly by getting a timely profit-and-loss statement with your expenses in dollars and percentages so you track changes before they get out of hand. Look carefully for unusual fluctuations when examining your statements. Pay close attention to expense items which lend themselves to personal (not business) use by yourself or your employees and evaluate whether you’re getting adequate benefit for the cost (e.g. mobile and long-distance-phone use, company-provided automobiles, Internet-access time, consumable supplies, etc.) At least once per quarter, review all expenses and ask, “How can I reduce this?”

 

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Laurie Owen is senior vice president at Business Resource Services. Contact her at [email protected].

[span class=note]This story is from the June 2006 edition of INSTORE[/span]

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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Laurie Owen: Leaders and Occupancy Costs

Published

on

Give your store a perfect figure

{loadposition laurieowenheader}

[h3]4.8%[/h3]

What is it? How much the top performers in the 2004 Jewelers Financial Benchmarking Study spent on occupancy costs. An occupancy cost of 4.8% means that for every $1 of sales, the company spends about 5 cents on occupancy costs, such as rent, occupancy, utilities, and store security.

Strategy: How to get by with spending less? Start by comparing yourself to others. Find industry benchmarks and see how you stack up, line by line. Monitor your expenses monthly by getting a timely profit-and-loss statement with your expenses in dollars and percentages so you track changes before they get out of hand. Look carefully for unusual fluctuations when examining your statements. Pay close attention to expense items which lend themselves to personal (not business) use by yourself or your employees and evaluate whether you’re getting adequate benefit for the cost (e.g. mobile and long-distance-phone use, company-provided automobiles, Internet-access time, consumable supplies, etc.) At least once per quarter, review all expenses and ask, “How can I reduce this?”

Advertisement

 


 

Laurie Owen is senior vice president at Business Resource Services. Contact her at [email protected].

[span class=note]This story is from the June 2006 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular