Connect with us

Jones Bros. Jewelers

Published

on

PEORIA, IL

Jones Bros. Jewelers

[dropcap cap=D]espite three years of double-digit growth following a move to a new location and the adoption of a bridal-focused format, Bob Woolsey and his mother, Betty Schlacter, weren’t satisfied. Their marketing just wasn’t keeping pace with the other changes at Jones Bros. Jewelers in Peoria, IL. “We felt we were butting up against a lid and that we needed to try something fresh and dynamic,” Schlacter says of their decision to seek new marketing help. [/dropcap]

DOUBLED BUDGET: The pair turned to Freshley Media Inc., which recommended they double their ad budget as part of a gambit to become the predominant jewelry presence on local radio. The onset of the recession made the decision risky but also meant they could buy cheap radio time.

SIX STATIONS: In March 2009 they rolled out their new campaign across six radio stations with Bob as the friendly, inviting and “believable” voice of the store.

SMART CASUAL: Inside the store, the idea that Jones Bros. is a fun, relaxed environment “where the customer is allowed to make the decision” is underscored by the casually dressed staff (Hawaiian shirts in summer, smart casual in winter but no ties or suits). Freshley also worked with the mother-and-son team to bring the same “good time” ethos to their monthly events (mostly bridal), to drive more traffic to the store.

Advertisement

SALES SURGE: The results were impressive. Sales surged 26 percent in 2009 to over $4 million; December sales alone were up 48 percent year on year. And this in the depths of the recession. “To be sure the annual gain was helped by an exploding gold business, but that was also part of the media strategy. Gold and bridal were the perfect one-two punch,” says Bruce Freshley.

MARKET DOMINANCE: “If you dominate your market, if you control the last mile, you will grow your business …. In most markets, radio is still the most cost-effective way to reach the most active consumers, especially young adults,” Freshley says. “Every jeweler in your town has a website, but only one jeweler can be the dominant radio advertiser.”

[span class=note]This story is from the September 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular

Fast Risers

Jones Bros. Jewelers

Published

on

PEORIA, IL

Jones Bros. Jewelers

[dropcap cap=D]espite three years of double-digit growth following a move to a new location and the adoption of a bridal-focused format, Bob Woolsey and his mother, Betty Schlacter, weren’t satisfied. Their marketing just wasn’t keeping pace with the other changes at Jones Bros. Jewelers in Peoria, IL. “We felt we were butting up against a lid and that we needed to try something fresh and dynamic,” Schlacter says of their decision to seek new marketing help. [/dropcap]

DOUBLED BUDGET: The pair turned to Freshley Media Inc., which recommended they double their ad budget as part of a gambit to become the predominant jewelry presence on local radio. The onset of the recession made the decision risky but also meant they could buy cheap radio time.

SIX STATIONS: In March 2009 they rolled out their new campaign across six radio stations with Bob as the friendly, inviting and “believable” voice of the store.

Advertisement

SMART CASUAL: Inside the store, the idea that Jones Bros. is a fun, relaxed environment “where the customer is allowed to make the decision” is underscored by the casually dressed staff (Hawaiian shirts in summer, smart casual in winter but no ties or suits). Freshley also worked with the mother-and-son team to bring the same “good time” ethos to their monthly events (mostly bridal), to drive more traffic to the store.

SALES SURGE: The results were impressive. Sales surged 26 percent in 2009 to over $4 million; December sales alone were up 48 percent year on year. And this in the depths of the recession. “To be sure the annual gain was helped by an exploding gold business, but that was also part of the media strategy. Gold and bridal were the perfect one-two punch,” says Bruce Freshley.

MARKET DOMINANCE: “If you dominate your market, if you control the last mile, you will grow your business …. In most markets, radio is still the most cost-effective way to reach the most active consumers, especially young adults,” Freshley says. “Every jeweler in your town has a website, but only one jeweler can be the dominant radio advertiser.”

[span class=note]This story is from the September 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular