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Paco’s Tips: Know Your People

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Consider your market’s potential demographics when deciding what sort of personality your store ought to have. Paco Underhill says it’s important to consider those potential customers and adapt your physical environment to fit their needs.

Consider your market’s potential demographics when deciding what sort of personality your store ought to have. Paco Underhill says it’s important to consider those potential customers and adapt your physical environment to fit their needs.

Here’s one example: If you own a jewelry store in southern Florida, Underhill says, 10 to 15 percent of people walking in the door are under age 12, because Latin families tend to shop in social clusters. The kids may not be your primary customer base, but the people walking in with them are, and so it would be in your best interest to entertain them. “So if I’m on 57th Street in New York, there are not a lot of kids who walk in,” Underhill says. “But if I’m at a jewelry store in Fort Lauderdale or Boca or Miami, having a children’s area might make a lot of sense.”

Others who feel disenfranchised by the process of shopping in a jewelry store are the under-30 crowd, Underhill says. “There are a generation of Americans, under 30, who are intimidated by the process. They think ‘I am getting ripped off so I’m going to buy my diamond online and take it to a store to have it set.”

Even so, all is not lost. Use that opportunity to build a relationship. “If I’m the brick-and-mortar store, I’ll set that ring for you because it gets me the chance to begin a relationship, to ask for your e-mail and ask, ‘Do you want me to remind you about Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day and your wife’s birthday? Because I can probably help you.”

Get more actionable advice from the world’s leading retail environment expert at The SMART Show. Paco Underhill’s must-see keynote session takes place on Saturday, April 18, at 8:30 a.m., and is sponsored by Synchrony Financial.

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Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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Paco’s Tips: Know Your People

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Published

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Consider your market’s potential demographics when deciding what sort of personality your store ought to have. Paco Underhill says it’s important to consider those potential customers and adapt your physical environment to fit their needs.

Consider your market’s potential demographics when deciding what sort of personality your store ought to have. Paco Underhill says it’s important to consider those potential customers and adapt your physical environment to fit their needs.

Here’s one example: If you own a jewelry store in southern Florida, Underhill says, 10 to 15 percent of people walking in the door are under age 12, because Latin families tend to shop in social clusters. The kids may not be your primary customer base, but the people walking in with them are, and so it would be in your best interest to entertain them. “So if I’m on 57th Street in New York, there are not a lot of kids who walk in,” Underhill says. “But if I’m at a jewelry store in Fort Lauderdale or Boca or Miami, having a children’s area might make a lot of sense.”

Others who feel disenfranchised by the process of shopping in a jewelry store are the under-30 crowd, Underhill says. “There are a generation of Americans, under 30, who are intimidated by the process. They think ‘I am getting ripped off so I’m going to buy my diamond online and take it to a store to have it set.”

Even so, all is not lost. Use that opportunity to build a relationship. “If I’m the brick-and-mortar store, I’ll set that ring for you because it gets me the chance to begin a relationship, to ask for your e-mail and ask, ‘Do you want me to remind you about Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day and your wife’s birthday? Because I can probably help you.”

Advertisement

Get more actionable advice from the world’s leading retail environment expert at The SMART Show. Paco Underhill’s must-see keynote session takes place on Saturday, April 18, at 8:30 a.m., and is sponsored by Synchrony Financial.

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

If It’s Time to Consolidate, It’s Time to Call Wilkerson

When Tom Moses decided to close one of the two Moses Jewelers stores in western Pennsylvania, it was time to call in the experts. After reviewing two candidates, Moses, a co-owner of the 72 year-old business, decided to go with Wilkerson. The sale went better than expected. Concerned about running it during the pandemic, Moses says it might have helped the sale. “People wanted to get out, so there was pent-up demand,” he says. “Folks were not traveling so there was disposable income, and we don’t recall a single client commenting to us, feeling uncomfortable. It was busy in here!” And perhaps most importantly, Wilkerson was easy to deal with, he says, and Susan, their personal Wilkerson consultant, was knowledgeable, organized and “really good.” Now, the company can focus on their remaining location — without the hassle of carrying over merchandise that either wouldn’t fit or hadn’t sold. “The decision to hire Wilkerson was a good one,” says Moses.

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